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Comment And what does that cost for gigabit routing? (Score 1) 56

The problem PFSense has as compared to consumer routers is that running on normal Intel CPUs it needs more CPU power (and thus cost) to be able to forward a given amount of traffic. Plus all the NICs and such are separate silicon. Boradcom makes little all-in-one chips that have a couple of ARM cores that have acceleration for routing and so on. Also they have things like an ethernet switch and ethernet PHYs on the chip so they needn't be added. Have a look at a BCM4709A for an example that is popular in routers.

PFSense is good but it is not the most economical thing if you are talking features matching a consumer router, meaning gig routing, multiple ports, and wifi, you can have your costs go up a fair bit. Particularly if you also then want it to be fairly small and low power. If you hop over to PFSense's site it would cost about $575 for a SG-2440 with WiFi which would give features roughly on par with a consumer router.

While I'd much rather have that over a consumer router, a consumer router is in fact what I have because I didn't want to spend a ton of money for a home router.

Comment Re:The judge issued a verdict ahead of trial? (Score 2) 166

If we had scaled representation as the population of the nation grew, it would be much more difficult to buy representatives.

Representation at levels we had when the country was founded would result in over 9,000 representatives today-- over 500 from LA and New York city each.

Likewise- Senators are grossly unrepresentative with some citizens having one senator per 280,000 citizens while other states have one senator per 19,000,000 citizens.

If states had been kept smaller and were divided by roughly equal populations, we would have over 600 senators.

It would be very tough to buy half of them. Votes would matter more. And as a voter, you'd know your representative better.

Comment Re:I'd be wary of Musk, too (Score 4, Insightful) 63

He seems really good at using government subsidies to make money for himself.

Well, that's the point isn't it? To jumpstart private industry? You can't do that without the profit motive.

Tesla paid it's 450 million 2009 loan back with interest in four years and went from the brink of bankruptcy to a market cap of 29 billion dollars. Sounds like a success story to me.

Comment Re:Wait, they shipped the private key? (Score 1) 60

But what possible use is publishing your private key?

Perhaps, it is to be able to deny responsibility for bad software later, but that's a little too far-fetched...

Well, we're not talking about publishing THE private key to anything Dell cares about. We're talking about publishing A private key that Dell can use to do things on the client's machine that undermine the security model. Why? Well there's lots of potential ways to create revenue or cut costs that way. For example Lenovo did it so they could inject ads into web pages that were supposedly cryptographically protected from tampering.

Comment Re: Live by the sword, die by the sword. (Score 3, Insightful) 178

Oh look, someone broke into your house, and stole all your valuables and personal belongings. Well you were stupid enough not to use bank vault doors, and you gave the spare key to a close friend who didn't lock his door that day.

The problem with Information security is that to be safe you need professional level of security on your consumer devices, and constant vigilance to keep it up. This is a lot of work for a person, especially if they don't find security patches fun, or barely get by using the internet.

Comment Re:Live by the sword, die by the sword. (Score 5, Insightful) 178

So we should be all nice and fuzzy with a group intent of harassing people. Oh they are making peoples lives miserable, but let them just go on their marry way, because if we mess with them they will mess with us too.

Yea it is OK the Nazi were capturing Jews, because we weren't Jews, if we did try to stop them, then they would just go after us.
Yep that mentality is looked soooo fondly in the view of history.

Comment Re: OMFG! (Score 2) 152

No I am saying different genders will gravitate towards different jobs. Towing more women at a job to meet a quota even if that isn't what they want to do, will just cause a higher level of turn over. However as I stated before this is a trend, not a rule. Like any trend there are exceptions... A lot of one, a Trend can mean 51% of a population will fall in such a category (assuming I have a low margin of error) meaning 49% will fall in the minority. 49% is a big minority.

There are a lot of talented women who are just as good if not better then men at the building and creating of technology, if that is what they want to do, we shouldn't say they can't because of their gender. However if there is a balance in the stereotypes and you find your organization isn't having the gender equity, then there is a problem with the organization which will need to be corrected, such as fostering values that will attract women stereotype tech workers to your field, as they will bring something the organization needs anyways.

Comment Re:Wait, they shipped the private key? (Score 1) 60

So, the happy owners of the affected laptops can now issue certificates and/or sign drivers, which will be accepted as genuine by other owners of Dell hardware?

Seriously? If so, that's just too dumb to be malicious...

It's not too dumb to be willful negligence -- defined in legal dictionaries as "Intentional performance of an unreasonable act in disregard of a known risk..."

Having the know-how to do such a thing necessarily entails knowledge of why its a bad idea. So either an engineer acted in breech of professional ethics, or managers rode roughshod over the engineers' objections.

Comment Re:High level? (Score 4, Insightful) 79

Speaking as someone who learned C in 1980, C was originally thought of as a low-level language -- a suitable replacement in most cases for assembly language that, while abstracting underlying details like the CPU instruction set and registers, remained relatively small and "close to the hardware". Then later 80s I was asked to take over a course on C, and when I looked at the course description I was surprised to see it described as a "high level language". I asked the person who wrote the description what he meant by "high level language", and he really had no idea. He said he meant it was "powerful", which of course is just as vague when comparing any two Turing equivalent languages.

Of course "high level" vs. "low level" is relative. C is "high level" in comparison to assembly, or "B", in which the only datatype was a computer word. On the other hand C "low level" in comparison to most other languages that hide away the details of the hardware like instruction set and registers and such. So it depends on what you're comparing to; but in general I think people who describe C as "low level" know more about what they're talking about than those who call it a "high level" language.

The important thing isn't whether C is "high" or "low" level; it is what makes C work, which is largely about what was left out. It didn't have all the bells and whistles of something like PL/1, which made the language easy to implement, even on a tiny 8 bit microcomputer, and easy to learn, in the form of a slim, almost pamphlet-like book (The C Programming Language, 1st edition was 228 paperback-sized pages long).

Even so, C has become very slightly more "higher level" over the years. The original K&R C was more weakly typed than the later ANSI C. Particularly when you were dealing with pointers, the declared type of a pointer in K&R C was more of a mnemonic aid to the programmer than anything else.

Comment Re:OMFG! (Score 1) 152

I work in a division where the gender population across the tech folks is 50/50 There is still an open position so depending who we fill in that roll will make the determining factor. However I work in health care, that industry will naturally attract a higher female group.
However in terms of looking at rolls to fill and the people who apply I find the following trends.
Male Tech workers: Focus a lot on the technology, they like to build and create, when there is a problem they will jump in and tackle it. When there is a development job they will be the first to volunteer.
Female Tech workers: Focus on the people, they are more likely to dig into a problem and find where it went wrong, offer suggestions on how to make a product better, and work with others to find what the ideal solution would be.

Working in a hospital we need a good mix of both, however if you are working in a place that builds software far more men will be attracted to that type of work.

Comment Re:Institutional Knowledge (Score 1) 159

The company that I was very fortunate to retire from is now in year 6 of a 3 year SAP project. People there tell me the schedule has now been officially adjusted from a 3 year project to a 20 year project to be completed in 2030.

Infosys told them it had SAP expertise and then failed to deliver. The company even had to hire back some of the people it laid off at higher salary.

Dumb dumb dumb.

Drilling for oil is boring.