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Comment: Re:ugh (Score 1) 179

by drinkypoo (#47762731) Attached to: Seagate Ships First 8 Terabyte Hard Drive

When did hard drives not fail? I've had failures since the early 90s, when they were in the 200 MB range.

Well, I'm sure someone will speak up about some tales of DASDs of yore still older than what I've had, but I still remember when Seagate was called "Seizegate" because of the frequency of occasion when one needed to dismount the drive, place it upon a soft surface, and give it a good rap on one corner (perpendicular to the axis of rotation) in order to permit it to spin up. 21MB of ST-225, baby.

Comment: Re:Sigh (Score 5, Interesting) 198

by Shakrai (#47761971) Attached to: Comcast Tells Government That Its Data Caps Aren't Actually "Data Caps"

We ALL know how Politicians get bought and sold so let's cut the "total" bullshit here.

Yes, they do. But not all of them and certainly not in the manner that the GP presented. One needs to actually understand how the system works before one condemns it and/or proposes fixes for it. Incidentally, most of the people in politics hate the system as much as you do. You think they enjoy spending so much of their day begging people for money so they can fund their campaigns? The real world isn't House of Cards, most people actually enter public service for noble reasons, ranging from the mundane fixing of potholes to the desire to advance a social cause. The problem is two fold:

1) Campaign finance reform is inherently suspect because it's passed by people who have an incentive to make it harder for incumbents to lose elections. There's a reason why opponents frequently referred to McCain-Feingold as the "Incumbent Protection Act"

2) Meaningful campaign finance reform would require a Constitutional Amendment; the idea I most liked was the notion of precluding private donations but giving every American citizen X dollars to allocate as they see fit. It's an awesome idea but one that's utterly unconstitutional. Perhaps you should start building a network for this concept rather than spouting talking points about money going into Senators pockets?

Comment: Re:Correlation Does Not Imply Causation (Score 1) 255

by Shakrai (#47761921) Attached to: The Evolution of Diet

Having everybody live off a high protein diet is unsustainable. There are whole segments of American society that couldn't afford it, never mind the third world, and even if money was no object it would be completely unsustainable from an environmental standpoint.

It's cute though that you took what I was saying and morphed it into "cutting sugar is unsustainable"; all I did was condemn your silly paleo diet, not the notion of cutting sugar or making other healthy lifestyle choices. One can cut out soda (or even enjoy it in moderation) without adopting a made up diet that claims to be what our ancestors ate.

Of course, physical activity is even better. I eat whatever the hell I want. You can do that when you're averaging 30 miles a week of running. Pass the cheesecake, mmm'kay?

Comment: Re:Sigh (Score 0) 198

by Shakrai (#47761861) Attached to: Comcast Tells Government That Its Data Caps Aren't Actually "Data Caps"

Of course they will, while comcast is telling them this, they are stuffing wads of money in the senators pockets.

You know that talking point is total bullshit, right? What you describe would be a felony offense in the United States. Nor can corporations give money directly to campaigns. They can donate to PACs, which are a special animal in the American political system, but they can't donate directly to campaigns or candidates. When people tell you that "Big oil/telecom/Hollywood/whatever gave X dollars to Y candidate" they really mean that the employees of those industries gave X dollars to Y candidate. Work at a gas station and donate $20 to your State Assemblywoman? That's added to the total donation from "big oil" when her opponent needs a talking point.

I realize such intricacies don't make for good talking points but it would be extremely helpful if people would at least learn how the system works rather than spreading FUD that only serves to undermine the tenuous amount of faith we have left in our system.

Comment: Re:Thing is, we know what we have to do (Score 1) 118

No, not really.

PACCAR (just a few miles away) is already making all-electric and fuel cell (H20 split) trucks, as well as hybrid trucks and biodiesel trucks.

Boeing is already making jets and planes that use 1/2 to 1/10th the fuel to move people and goods. China and almost all First World nations are making high speed trains, and Canada has used fuel cell trains powered entirely by wind and solar along train lines (using battery swap modules) as well as biodiesel ones.

Tractors in the EU and various other nations are made to use biodiesel or fuel cells. We sell it from US/Canadian plants overseas.

We have the technology and the large-scale production capacity to make it.

You just don't get that the 20th Century is over.

Wake up and smell the Adapt Or Die change.

Adapt. Or die.

Comment: Re:Thing is, we know what we have to do (Score 1) 118

by JWW (#47761229) Attached to: Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Your "simple" plan cuts transportation by a huge margin, say hello to large price increases for anything transported further than a trivial distance. The food you eat is not just transported, but planted, and harvested using the energy whose price you massively increased. Increase food prices even more. Your plan for coal breaks the power grid. Brownouts, blackouts and mandatory rationing will be necessary. Oh and the impact on food refrigeration will help increase food costs even more again.

Your "simple" solution would cause massive chaos, social unrest, riots and death. I suppose if thats your simple goal, then you're fine.

Comment: Re:Backward-thinking by the DMV (Score 1) 437

by penguinoid (#47761181) Attached to: California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

No, what I'm saying is where is the log of which times the Google cars were driving autonomously and which times the professional drivers took control? If the drivers took control every 5 minutes, then it would be pretty much irrelevant how many total miles the cars logged autonomously.

Comment: Re:Mod parent to infinity (Score 2) 118

by penguinoid (#47761013) Attached to: Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

What this means is even if we find some means of restoration that is 100 times as potent at cooling the planet as CO2 is in warming it, the task is incomprehensibly huge.

No. No it isn't. There's a few individuals who could personally afford to send us back into an ice age. Just to give a couple examples,

According to estimates by the Council on Foreign Relations, "one kilogram of well placed sulfur in the stratosphere would roughly offset the warming effect of several hundred thousand kilograms of carbon dioxide."

Recent research has expanded this constant to "106 C: 16 N: 1 P: .001 Fe" signifying that in iron deficient conditions each atom of iron can fix 106,000 atoms of carbon,[34] or on a mass basis, each kilogram of iron can fix 83,000 kg of carbon dioxide.

But they have side effects. And perhaps they have side effects that won't become apparent until we try them on a large scale.

+ - Some raindrops exceed their terminal velocity->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "New research reveals that some raindrops are “super-terminal” (they travel more than 30% faster than their terminal velocity, at which air resistance prevents further acceleration due to gravity). The drops are the result of natural processes—and they make up a substantial fraction of rainfall. Whereas all drops the team studied that were 0.8 millimeters and larger fell at expected speeds, between 30% and 60% of those measuring 0.3 mm dropped at super-terminal speeds. It’s not yet clear why these drops are falling faster than expected, the researchers say. But according to one notion, the speedy drops are fragments of larger drops that have broken apart in midair but have yet to slow down. If that is indeed the case, the researchers note, then raindrop disintegration happens normally in the atmosphere and more often than previously presumed—possibly when drops collide midair or become unstable as they fall through the atmosphere. Further study could improve estimates of the total amount of rainfall a storm will produce or the amount of erosion that it can generate."
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