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Bitcoin

"DDoS-For-Bitcoin" Blackmailers Arrested (softpedia.com) 27

An anonymous reader writes: The DDoSing outfit that spawned the trend of "DDoS-for-Bitcoin" has been arrested by Europol in Bosnia Herzegovina last month. DD4BC first appeared in September 2015, when Akamai blew the lid on their activities. Since then almost any script kiddie that can launch DDoS attacks has followed their business model by blackmailing companies for Bitcoin.

Comment Sky burial is not limited to Tibet (Score 1) 197

http://www.academia.edu/375869...

The practice of Sky Burial was at one time, pretty common, from Anatolia to China

Even today, the Parsi people (whose ancestors came from Persia - currently known as Iran) in India still practice Sky Burial

http://www.treehugger.com/cult...

In Iran, "Towers of Silence" still exist, in remote places

http://www.slate.com/blogs/atl...

Submission + - Chinese Scientists Discover the Infectious Mechanism of Ebola Virus (elsevierhealth.com) 2

hackingbear writes: Scientists at Institute of Microbiology of Chinese Academic of Science in Beijing have discovered the mechanism of how Ebola virus infects human beings. Filoviruses, including Ebola and Marburg, cause fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and primates. Understanding how these viruses enter host cells could help to develop effective therapeutics. An endosomal protein, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), has been identified as a necessary entry receptor for this process, and priming of the viral glycoprotein (GP) to a fusion-competent state is a prerequisite for NPC1 binding. The researchers have determined the crystal structure of the primed GP (GPcl) of Ebola virus bound to domain C of NPC1 (NPC1-C) at a resolution of 2.3 Å. NPC1-C utilizes two protruding loops to engage a hydrophobic cavity on head of GPcl. Upon enzymatic cleavage and NPC1-C binding, conformational change in the GPcl further affects the state of the internal fusion loop, triggering membrane fusion.
Android

Android Banking Malware SlemBunk Part of Well-Organized Campaign (fireeye.com) 35

itwbennett writes: Researchers from FireEye first documented the SlemBunk Android Trojan that targets mobile banking users in December. Once installed, it starts monitoring the processes running on the device and when it detects that a mobile banking app is launched, it displays a fake user interface on top of it to trick users into inputting their credentials. The Trojan can spoof the user interfaces of apps from at least 31 banks from across the world and two mobile payment service providers. The attack is more complicated than it appears at first glance, because the APK (Android application package) that users first download does not contain any malicious functionality, making it hard for antivirus apps and even Android's built-in app scanner to detect it.
Mars

NASA Safety Panel Finds Concerns With the Journey To Mars (examiner.com) 155

MarkWhittington writes: NASA's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel issued its annual report on various space agency programs. The panel found a number of areas of concern surrounding the Journey to Mars program, virtually all of them stemming from inadequate funding. It suggested that NASA's plan to launch the first crewed mission on the Orion, which would use the heavy lift Space Launch System to go around the moon, in 2021 was unrealistic given current, anticipated funding. The panel also suggested that lack of a clear plan for the Mars program is compromising its viability. It also suggested that the decision not to return to the moon should be revisited in view of the desire of international partners to do so and the need of low gravity surface experience in advance of going to Mars
EU

EU Companies Can Monitor Employees' Private Conversations While At Work (softpedia.com) 127

An anonymous reader writes: A recent ruling of the European Court of Human Rights has granted EU companies the right to monitor and log private conversations that employees have at work while using the employer's devices. The ruling came after a Romanian was fired for using Yahoo Messenger back in 2007, while at work, to have private conversations with his girlfriend. He argued that his employer was breaking his right for privacy and correspondence. Both Romanian and European courts disagreed.
Crime

Sweden Makes Another Request To Ecuador For Permission To Question Assange (thelocal.se) 133

cold fjord writes: Thelocal.se reports that Sweden's state prosecutor's office said today that it has formally asked Ecuador in writing for permission to interrogate Julian Assange. They don't know when Ecuador will reply. The request follows the signing of an agreement in December on general legal cooperation between the two countries. Ecuador required the agreement before it would consent to an interview of Assange. The Swedish prosecutors want to question Assange regarding rape allegations that have a statute of limitations that run till 2020. The statue of limitations for other sex crimes Assange has been accused of have expired while Assange has been in hiding. Sweden had previously asked to question Assange in the embassy, but Ecuador declined permission. In another peculiar twist to the case, RTE.ie is reporting that Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino has stated that the exact procedures that will be used are not known, but that Ecuadorian prosecutors will be the ones actually questioning Assange although Swedish officials can be present. Sweden's view on this is unclear.

Submission + - Kentucky considering banning some social media comments (digitaltrends.com)

Taco Cowboy writes: A bill targeting social media content that is already being labelled unconstitutional has been put before the Kentucky General Assembly

If passed, the bill would prohibit social media users to wait an hour before posting content related to a “traumatic event” or “accident” online. Those who violate the proposed bill would face a fine anywhere between $20 to $100 depending on the incident. The bill would not apply to members of the news media, victims of the event, and emergency responders at the site of the accident

According to the sponsor of the bill, Republican State Representative John “Bam” Carney of Campbellsville, the speed at which users can access social media to post about a tragic event can be both disruptive for police officers and insensitive to the families of the victims

Carney believes that abstaining from social platforms such as Snapchat, Facebook, and Twitter in the wake of a serious accident would allow the police and first responders time to notify families of those involved in the incident before they find out elsewhere

Legal experts argue that the bill won’t stand up to scrutiny under the First Amendment, regarding freedom of speech. And, apparently, Carney agrees, stating, “this probably would have First Amendment problems”

Comment When brains work for the wrong boss ... (Score 4, Interesting) 96

Ms. Caracristi was a real brainer

I had opportunity of meeting her decades ago and came away very impressed

But ... like so many other brains, she worked for the wrong boss

No, it is not a sin to break codes - the only thing is that NSA has more interests in playing the role of a big brother sidekick than actually protecting our country

RIP, Ms. Caracristi !

Privacy

Nvidia Blames Apple For Bug That Exposes Browsing In Chrome's Incognito (venturebeat.com) 165

An anonymous reader points out this story at VentureBeat about a bug in Chrome's incognito mode that might be a cause for concern for some Apple users. From the story: "If you use Google Chrome's incognito mode to hide what you browse (ahem, porn), this might pique your interest. University of Toronto engineering student Evan Andersen discovered a bug that affects Nvidia graphics cards, exposing content that you thought would be for your eyes only. And because this only happens on Macs, Nvidia is pointing the finger at Apple."

Submission + - Coalition letter to Congress opposing TSA's new mandatory-AIT rule (epic.org)

saizai writes: A 26-organization coalition (including ACLU, CAIR, EFF, EPIC, NCTE) just sent a letter to Congress opposing TSA's new rule making AIT (aka "electronic strip search") mandatory under secret conditions, triggered in part by my lawsuit.

Contact your own senator/rep here. Especially if they're on the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee.

Previously on Slashdot.

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