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+ - Visa And Mastercard Link Up With Mobile Money Providers In Africa->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "When it comes to mobile payments, Africans are far ahead of the rest of the world, since many people there have cell phones but few have traditional bank accounts. Now Visa and Mastercard are trying to tap into this market, partering with African mobile payment providers to try to connect these potential customers to the global financial system."
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+ - Building An Abuse-Resistant Commenting System->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "All you have to do is look at the comment section of any YouTube video to know how low the bar is set for Internet discourse. While there are structures in place on some social media networks to block abusive commenters, some dream of doing better: inspired by Marshall Rosenberg’s widely-adopted Nonviolent Communication method, Sasha Akhavi aims to set up a commenting system that addresses this problem via user interface and interaction design."
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+ - Amazon Opening Imported Goods Store on Alibaba->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Amazon is usually on the other end of the 'if you can't beat em, join em' dynamic. But next month Amazon is launching a store on Alibaba’s Tmall.com site to get access to some of the Chinese online retail giant's 265 million monthly active users. Amazon already has its own e-commerce site geared for the country, but its share of China’s online retail market is only 0.8 percent, according to Beijing-based research firm Analysys International. Alibaba, in contrast, controls three quarters of the market through its Tmall and Taobao Marketplace sites."
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+ - VMware Sued for Alleged GPL License Infractions->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Christoph Hellwig, who holds copyrights on portions of the Linux kernel, alleges VMware combined proprietary source code with open-source code in its ESXi product line but has not released it publicly as required by the General Public License version 2 (GPLv2). VMware is accused of wrapping its “vmkernel,” which is part of its ESXi virtualization software for servers, with open-source code. For its part, VMware says it believes the lawsuit is without merit."
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+ - Fujitsu Tech Can Track Heavily Blurred People In Security Videos-> 1

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Fujitsu has developed image-processing technology that can be used to track people in security camera footage, even when the images are heavily blurred to protect their privacy. The company says that detecting the movements of people in this way could be useful for retail design, reducing pedestrian congestion in crowded urban areas or improving evacuation routes for emergencies. An indoor test of the system was able to track the paths of 80 percent of test subjects, according to the company."
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+ - Musician Releases Album of Music to Code By->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Music and programming go hand-in-keyboard. And now programmer/musician Carl Franklin has released an album of music he wrote specifically for use as background music when writing software. 'The biggest challenge was dialing back my instinct to make real music,' Franklin told ITworld's Phil Johnson. 'This had to fade into the background. It couldn't distract the listener, but it couldn't be boring either. That was a particular challenge that I think most musicians would have found maddening.'"
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+ - Apple, Google, Bringing Low-Pay Support Employees In-House->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "One of the knocks against Silicon Valley giants as "job creators" is that the companies themselves often only hire high-end employees; support staff like security guards and janitors are contracted out to staffing agencies and receive lower pay and fewer benefits, even if they work on-site full time. That now seems to be changing, with Apple and Google putting security gaurds on their own payroll."
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+ - Microsoft Convinced That Windows 10 Will Be Its Smartphone Breakthrough-> 1

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "At the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, handset manufacturers are making all the right noises about support for Windows 10, which will run on both ARM- and Intel-based phones and provide an experience very much like the desktop. But much of the same buzz surrounded Windows 8 and Windows 7 Phone. In fact, Microsoft has tried and repeatedly failed to take the mobile space by storm."
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+ - One Year Later, We're No Closer To Finding MtGox's Missing Millions->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "When Mt. Gox collapsed on Feb. 28, 2014, with liabilities of some ¥6.5 billion ($63.6 million), it said it was unable to account for some 850,000 bitcoins. Some 200,000 coins turned up in an old-format bitcoin wallet last March, bringing the tally of missing bitcoins to 650,000 (now worth about $180 million). In January, Japan’s Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper, citing sources close to a Tokyo police probe of the MtGox collapse, reported that only 7,000 of the coins appear to have been taken by hackers, with the remainder stolen through a series of fraudulent transactions. But there’s still no explanation of what happened to them, and no clear record of what happened on the exchange."
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+ - Study: Refactoring Doesn't Improve Code Quality->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "A team of researchers in Sri Lanka set out to test whether common refactoring techniques resulted in measurable improvements in software quality, both externally (e.g., Is the code more maintainable?) and internally (e.g., Number of lines of code). Here's the tl;dr version of their findings: Refactoring doesn’t make code easier to analyze or change; it doesn't make code run faster; and it doesn't doesn’t result in lower resource utilization. But it may make code more maintainable."
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+ - $415M Silicon Valley Salary-Fixing Conspiracy Settlement Heads For Approval->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "A lawsuit last year argued that the biggest players in Silicon Valley, including Google, Apple, Intel, Adobe, Intuit, Lucasfilm, and Pixar had engaged in a conspiracy to fix and suppress employee salaries; an initial settlement in the suit at over $300 million was deemed by a judge to be too low. Now a $415 million settlement is headed for approval."
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+ - Mississipppi Attorney General Conspires With MPAA To Revive SOPA->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood filed a subpoena last October seeking information about Google’s search and advertising practices in areas related to banned substances, human trafficking and copyrighted material. But a Federal judge has now quashed that investigation — and information from last fall's Sony leak made seemed to indicate that Hood had agreed to work with the MPAA to launch it in the first place, as part of a move to revive the reviled SOPA legislation through other means."
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+ - Why Computers Still Struggle To Tell the Time-> 1

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "It’s pretty much impossible for a computer to keep exact time, although accuracy can be improved to the extent that users are willing to spend more money on the problem, said George Neville-Neil, a software engineer who helps financial institutions and other time-sensitive organizations maintain ultra-precise measurements of time. To keep internal time, computers use a crystal oscillator that creates an electromagnetic signal, or a vibration that the computer uses to coordinate processor, memory, bus and motherboard operations. But computer makers often use inexpensive crystals costing only a few cents each, which can compromise accuracy. 'If you buy server-class hardware, you will get cheap crystal, and time will wander if you don’t do something about it,' Neville-Neil said."
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