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+ - Hillary warns media to curb their 1st Amendment rights, or else!->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "So, Americans !

You have voted for a President who won a Nobel Peace Prize

Are you ready to vote for a President who wants the media forgo their First Amendment Rights?We already know that the Constitution of the United States of America has gone into the toilet bowl, but now, a public figure is out in the open telling the media to stop exercising their First Amendment Rights or face the music

A former first lady, Hillary intends to become the first lady president of the United States and to achieve her goal, she has issued a list of “demands” for words that the press can not say about her

As revealed by New York Times writer Amy Chozick, a list of words, including "Polarizing, Calculating, Disingenuous, Insincere, Secretive, Ambitious, Inevitable, Entitled, Over confident" are not to be used when writing news articles about Hillary

According to Hillary and her Super PAC, any media outlet / reporter will be labeled as sexist and attacked if we say any of these things about Hillary"

Link to Original Source

+ - Rumor: Samsung Wants To Buy AMD->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Rumors are flying around the Asian press that Samsung wants to buy AMD. The deal would make a certain amount of sense from Samsung's viewpoint, giving it crucial inroads into CPU and GPU markets and a line of attack against Qualcomm. But it would also wreak havoc with the delicate network of deals and agreements within the chipmaking industry, especially when it comes to rights to x86 intellectual property."
Link to Original Source

+ - Physical sciences contribute 22% of economy->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "According to a report published in Australit — http://www.science.org.au/scie... — physical sciences, including core disciplines of physics, chemistry, earth sciences and the mathematical sciences have contributed around 22% of the Australian economy The direct contribution of the advanced physical and mathematical sciences is equal to 11% of the economy while additional and flow-on benefits add another 11%, bringing the total benefits to almost A$300 billion a year The report also notes that this estimate is likely to be conservative, and sets out several other areas of benefit that are harder to measure The report carefully considered the pathways by which the advanced physical and mathematical sciences yielded economic benefits and the Australian community’s continuing commitment to the advanced physical and mathematical sciences would be needed to ensure that the benefits from what is essentially a global scientific enterprise will continue to accrue to the Australian economy The economists who prepared the report conducted industry consultations to determine the importance of the physical sciences to Australia’s 506 industry classes. They outline the economic contribution of the sciences to the top 10 industry groups in an appendix to the report There are three distinct sources of useful knowledge, the report says: the core disciplines of mathematics, physics and chemistry can provide useful knowledge individually and it takes banking as an example: "“Part of the banking industry relies on complex mathematically based models that support risk and investment decisions, but on no other science input. We estimate that 3.6% of Australia’s economic output is produced from inputs that embody useful knowledge from a single core discipline” The economists also estimate that 7.3% of Australia’s economic output is produced from inputs that embody useful knowledge from multiple disciplines. So the multidisciplinary nature of science means that the total impact of science is greater than the sum of the contributions of the individual sciences"
Link to Original Source

+ - A tale of industrial espionage->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "First, the links -

This tale of an industrial turncoat ought to be a lesson to all high-tech captains

An employee of TSMC defected to Samsung is the focus of this tale of industrial espionage

TSMC has paid dearly due to their inaction and is losing clients, including Apple, Qualcomm and Nvidia, to Samsung, as a result

TSMC's blind trust on its former employee, and the resultant loss of business should become a case study for all industrial captains, especially those running high-tech companies

Here's a very brief quote

Many people were puzzled why the normally decisive TSMC had suddenly gone soft. In fact, in May 2010, the vice president of TSMC's human resources division at the time, Tu Long-chin, sent an e-mail to Liang saying he had seen reports that Liang was already employed by Samsung. That, Tu warned, would constitute a violation of the non-compete clause and lead to the forfeiture of his shares, which would be handed over to the TSMC Education and Culture Foundation.

Liang immediately replied, writing: "I have never, am not now and will never in the future do anything to let down the company."

A month later Tu and Richard Thurston, then general counsel and vice president of TSMC's legal division, held a meeting with Liang at which he promised that he "will not join Samsung now or in the future." The next day, he even sent a letter to Thurston, with whom he had been close, saying that he was thinking of resigning his position at Sungkyunkwan University.

During that time, Liang even wrote a letter to Morris Chang, insisting on his innocence and saying that he had TSMC blood in his system.

Ultimately, TSMC executives decided to believe their old comrade who had fought alongside them for more than a decade and pay him the more than NT$100 million his 738,000 withheld shares were worth in three installments.

But on July 13, 2011, just two months after collecting the final installment of the stock payout, Liang formally became the chief technology officer of Samsung Electronics' System LSI division. When the news spread, it came as a slap in the face to those who trusted him

To do justice to the story, you just gotta read it yourself"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:That's Easy, Jomo! (Score 1, Informative) 255

by Bruce Perens (#49230369) Attached to: On Firing Open Source Community Members

Hi AC,

This is sort of self-contradictory, so I don't really need to respond to it directly. I just want to point one thing out. I can't afford to work for any company as less than a C-level employee. It would be a salary cut from my current business.

Not to mention that I'd not like it.

Comment: Re:That's Easy, Jomo! (Score 2, Insightful) 255

by Bruce Perens (#49230275) Attached to: On Firing Open Source Community Members

I can't say I'm happy about what's happened to Debian. Having Ubuntu as a commercial derivative really has been the kiss of death for it, not that there were not other problems. It strikes me that the kernel team has done better for its lack of a constitution and elections, and Linus' ability to tell someone to screw off. I even got to tell him to screw off when he was dumping on 'Tridge over Bitkeeper. Somehow, that stuff works.

IMO, don't create a happy inclusive project team full of respect for each other. Hand-pick the geniuses and let them fight. You get better code in the end.

This actually has something to do with why so many people hate Systemd. It turns out that Systemd is professional-quality work done by competent salaried engineers. Our problem with it is that we're used to beautiful code made by geniuses. Going all of the way back to DMR.

Comment: Re:That's Easy, Jomo! (Score 1) 255

by Bruce Perens (#49230079) Attached to: On Firing Open Source Community Members

It really does look like Jomo did post this article, and it refers to another article of his.

What isn't to like about Ubuntu is that it's a commercial project with a significant unpaid staff. Once in a while I make a point of telling the unpaid staff that there really are better ways that they could be helping Free Software.

Comment: Re:That's Easy, Jomo! (Score 4, Interesting) 255

by Bruce Perens (#49229989) Attached to: On Firing Open Source Community Members

It's just that I object folks who would be good community contributors being lured into being unpaid employees instead.

Say how do feel about idiots working for corporations contractually enmeshed with the US military-industrial-surveillance complex. Why no spittle-laced hate for them?

The GNU Radio project was funded in part by a United States intelligence agency. They paid good money and the result is under GPL. What's not to like?

"You're a creature of the night, Michael. Wait'll Mom hears about this." -- from the movie "The Lost Boys"

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