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Comment Re:Editors : WTF (Score 0) 149 149

Technically it's giving smaller amounts of something, not taking anything away. Nonetheless marginally it makes perfect sense to talk about "doling out cuts". It means starting with a total net cut and dividing the marginal impact among several parties.

Yes, it will raise a few eyebrows among editorial prigs, but it's perfectly clear what "doling out cuts" means.

Comment Re:Batteries in Cold Weather? (Score 1) 473 473

If you add up all the auxiliary stuff you need to power with electricity and round up generously, it's maybe 2000 watts load. The very best commercially available technology of today can run that load for 45 hours. So the impact of the auxiliary system load is marginal. That means it's only a concern if you're contemplating using close to the maximum range of your car. If you're traveling 15 miles each way in an 84 mile range Leaf, or 80 miles each way in a 250 mile range Tesla S, you don't really need to worry about running the heater and lights, even counting diminished battery capacity.

The average American spends 25 minutes each way commuting; even in NYC the average figure is 34.6. Even double or tripling that commute time due to bad weather and halfing the range due to cold, that's still easy for the Tesla. It's a bit of challenge for the Leaf with its 24 kwh battery and 84 mile range.

If the typical electric cars of ten years from now perform close to the high end of today, then the vast majority of people won't have to worry about cold weather's effect on range. But a sizable minority of Americans are what the US Census characterizes as "extreme commuters": people whose commute takes more than 90 minutes or fifty miles each way. Even at the low end of that spectrum cold weather range won't be an issue, but if you commute from Fargo to Bismarck ND every day it's safe to say you aren't going to be going electric any time soon.

Comment Re:Not really (Score 1) 265 265

You know it's possible to be against both, right?

For example: the thread here is all about how big bad megacorps have been using sophistry to hide dangerous things on their labels.

And why did this come up? Because someone wanted a giant warning that a product may contain GMOs on every product this applies to.

That's a wacko position. Why is it wacko? Well, because it does nothing to help the problem they subsequently claim to want addressed, that labels are often misleading. It actually makes the label more misleading, by highlighting a non-essential fact, giving weight to it, and pretending it's something the buyer should be concerned about, while leaving the the manufacturers to continue to do whatever they want with the ingredient list.

GMOs that do not make significant changes to a product that would leave unusual chemicals in them are not dangerous. Their presence in a food product shouldn't be highlighted as something for a consumer to be concerned about. Doing so does not give the consumer more options, it confuses them and draws attention away from real health issues like sugars and potentially harmful fats.

Comment Re:DC power (Score 1) 191 191

Well, I think we are getting better at converting DC voltages, which is why HVDC is being used for transmission lines for example.

I suspect the reason is in part portable electronics. We're trying to eke out as much power as possible for multivoltage devices (one voltage for the processor, another for the screen, another for the HDD (portable electronics includes laptops too...) another for the USB bus, etc) from a single (DC it goes without saying) battery. The amount of R&D into the voltage conversion field over the last thirty years must have been extraordinary, yet not sexy enough to warrant much media coverage.

Comment Re:My Pet Peeves (recent Windows laptop keyboards) (Score 1) 641 641

I guess it depends on what you're used to. I practically grew up with laptops, so I always type numbers with the upper row, even if a numeric pad is available. I also think the number pad is a matter of space and reach, even on a desktop, but especially on a laptop where keys are already crammed. I'm sure a lot of proficient typists also appreciate a centred keyboard on a laptop.

Comment Re:Caps Lock used to power a huge lever. (Score 1) 641 641

My keyboard has two Ctrl keys in a rather symmetric orientation, and I like them that way, much like the two Shift keys. If the left Ctrl were in the place of Caps Lock, then its right counterpart would have to replace Enter.

It's not that I like having a Caps Lock around doing nothing, but it's not exactly a great place for a modifier which generally comes in symmetric pairs.

Comment Re:Another browser (Score 3, Insightful) 249 249

It's great when you can get away with that, but all too many companies (like where I work) have to deal with our customers as they are, not how we would wish them to be.

It's all the people like you who are the problem. If "use something standards-compliant or have a bad experience" were the universal norm, we wouldn't have these problems.

You say that like you think it's my decision to do this. I assure you, it is not.

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