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+ - Who is Discouraging Women From STEM Careers?->

Submitted by Press2ToContinue
Press2ToContinue (2424598) writes "Having worked in a STEM field (computer programming) for over a quarter of a century, I have found the idea that girls are discouraged from entering STEM fields to be curious. It certainly didn't line up with my experience in the industry. Schools have been pushing girls into math and science, not discouraging them. In my experience technology companies have been bending over backwards and jumping through hoops to get more women into IT (information technology). From programs aimed at getting high school students involved in technology to hiring decisions, there has always been a blunt, out-in-the-open emphasis on getting more women into IT.

So, if it's not “the patriarchy” pushing women down and denying them a chance to enter technology fields, what does account for women being underrepresented in technology fields? After a little research into personality types and career fields, I think I found the answer.

The Myers-Briggs personality test places people into 16 personality type categories. One researcher surveyed computer programmers to determine what personality types were represented. I compared how common the personality types were among programmers compared to how common they were in the general population, and although there is always room for error, a clear pattern emerged from my analysis placing programmers, men, and women, into a clearer picture for me to understand their under-representation."

Link to Original Source

+ - Twitter moves non-US accounts to Ireland away from the NSA-> 1

Submitted by Mark Wilson
Mark Wilson (3799011) writes "Twitter has updated its privacy policy, creating a two-lane service that treats US and non-US users differently. If you live in the US, your account is controlled by San Francisco-based Twitter Inc, but if you're elsewhere in the world (anywhere else) it's handled by Twitter International Company in Dublin, Ireland. The changes also affect Periscope.

What's the significance of this? Twitter Inc is governed by US law, it is obliged to comply with NSA-driven court requests for data. Data stored in Ireland is not subject to the same obligation. Twitter is not alone in using Dublin as a base for non-US operations; Facebook is another company that has adopted the same tactic. The move could also have implications for how advertising is handled in the future."

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+ - Earth microbe prefers living on meteorites->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Scientists have found a microbe that is happier living on meteorites than on Earth. The organism—an archaea known as Metallosphaera sedula—was originally found in 1989 living in Italy's hot acidic sulfur springs around Vesuvius. When the researchers gave them an energy drink made of powdered meteorite, the microbes went on a space dust binge—consuming their samples in only 2 weeks as compared with the 2 months it took for them to munch through their Earth samples. The team says its work could have implications for asteroid mining, where rare metals embedded in space rocks could be extracted and brought back to Earth for use in technological advancements."
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+ - The e-voting machine anyone can hack

Submitted by Presto Vivace
Presto Vivace (882157) writes "Meet the e-voting machine so easy to hack, it will take your breath away

Virginia election officials have decertified an electronic voting system after determining that it was possible for even unskilled people to surreptitiously hack into it and tamper with vote counts.

The AVS WINVote, made by Advanced Voting Solutions, passed necessary voting systems standards and has been used in Virginia and, until recently, in Pennsylvania and Mississippi. It used the easy-to-crack passwords of "admin," "abcde," and "shoup" to lock down its Windows administrator account, Wi-Fi network, and voting results database respectively, according to a scathing security review published Tuesday by the Virginia Information Technologies Agency. The agency conducted the audit after one Virginia precinct reported that some of the devices displayed errors that interfered with vote counting during last November's elections.

"

Comment: Not to be overly paranoid here but... (Score 0) 23

by Press2ToContinue (#49481091) Attached to: How Brain Pacemakers Treat Parkinson's Disease

There would be no way to know if there were any additional functions embedded in those devices.

It took 20 years for Snowden to reveal the NSA's illegal surveillance, and the previously almost-unimaginable bounds to which they were willing to go to monitor US civilians.

Just saying,

+ - World's Tiniest Computers Are About To Be Released->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "University of Michigan professors are about to release the design files for a one-cubic-millimeter computer, or mote. They have finally reached a goal set in 1997, when UC Berkeley professor Kristopher Pister coined the term "smart dust" and envisioned computers blanketing the Earth. Such motes are likely to play a key role in the much-ballyhooed Internet of Things."
Link to Original Source

+ - How deep brain stimulation actually works->

Submitted by the_newsbeagle
the_newsbeagle (2532562) writes "Pharmaceutical research for neuropsychiatric disorders hasn't produced many breakthroughs lately, which may explain why there's so much excitement around "electroceutical" research. That buzzy new field encompasses deep brain stimulation (DBS), in which an implanted stimulator sends little jolts through the neural tissue. DBS has become an accepted therapy for Parkinson's and other motor disorders, even though researchers haven't really understood how it works. Now, new research may have found the mechanism of action in Parkinson's patients: The stimulation reduces an exaggerated synchronization of neuron activity in the motor cortex."
Link to Original Source

+ - Chinese Government to Put 3D Printers in All 400,000 Elementary Schools-> 1

Submitted by InfiniteZero
InfiniteZero (587028) writes "Education is probably one of the areas that will benefit the most from 3D printers in the long run. The problem though is getting the machines into the schools in the first place. The Chinese government has a new policy to install a 3D printer in each of its approximately 400,000 elementary schools over the next two years."
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+ - As encryption spreads, U.S. grapple with clash between privacy, security->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "For months, federal law enforcement agencies and industry have been deadlocked on a highly contentious issue: Should tech companies be obliged to guarantee U.S. government access to encrypted data on smartphones and other digital devices, and is that even possible without compromising the security of law-abiding customers?

NSA director Adm. Michael S. Rogers wants to require technology companies to create a digital key that could open any smartphone or other locked device to obtain text messages or photos, but divide the key into pieces so that no one person or agency alone could decide to use it?

What's to stop the FISA court from secretly ordering all key masters to secretly give their key to the NSA? How would we know that the government doesn't already have all of the keys?"

Link to Original Source

+ - MIT May Help Lead Bitcoin Standards Effort->

Submitted by gthuang88
gthuang88 (3752041) writes "With everyone from PayPal merchants to Rand Paul starting to accept Bitcoins as payment, the race is on to develop technical standards for the virtual currency. Now MIT Media Lab director Joi Ito is getting ready to unveil a plan for MIT to become an independent, neutral home for standards development. Ito is enlisting cryptographer Ron Rivest and economist Simon Johnson to help with the effort, which could provide an academic alternative to the Bitcoin Foundation for conversations about the currency’s future."
Link to Original Source

+ - Should robots make life/death decisions? UN to debate lethal autonomous weapons->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2948665) writes "Should robots be allowed to make life and death decisions? This will be the topic of heated debate at the United Nations (UN) Palais des Nations in Geneva next week (April 13-17th, 2015). As part of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW), experts from all over the world will gather to discuss “questions related to emerging technologies in the area of lethal autonomous weapons systems.” The Open Roboethics Research Initiative will be presenting public views at the debate."
Link to Original Source

+ - BitTorrent Launches Its Torrent-Based Browser Project Maelstrom In Beta

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "BitTorrent today launched Project Maelstrom, the company's distributed browser, in beta. The company also released new tools on GitHub that let developers and publishers build content for the browser. Announced in December, BitTorrent described Project Maelstrom, then just an invite-only alpha, as “the first torrent-based browser.” The launch today is an open beta, meaning anyone can now try an early version of Maelstrom. You do, however, need a Windows computer. Windows users can download the beta now from here. Since the alpha, BitTorrent says it has improved stability, integrated support for automatic updates, and added DHT visualization for users when loading torrents."

+ - "Let's Encrypt" Project Strives To Make Encryption Simple

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "As part of an effort to make encryption a standard component of every application, Linux Foundation has launched its Let's Encrypt project (announcement) along with its intention to provide access to a free certificate management service. Jim Zemlin, executive director for the Linux Foundation, says that the goal for the project is nothing less than universal adoption of encryption to disrupt a multi-billion dollar cracker economy. While there may never be such a thing as perfect security, Zemlin says it's just too easy to steal data that is not encrypted. In its current form, encryption is difficult to implement and a lot of cost and overhead is associated with managing encryption keys. Zemlin claims that the Let's Encrypt project will reduce the effort it takes to encrypt data in an application down to two simple commands. The project is being hosted by the Linux Foundation, but the actual project is being managed by the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG). This work is sponsored by Akamai, Cisco, EFF, Mozilla, IdenTrust, and Automattic, which all are Linux Foundation patrons. Visit Let's Encrypt official website to get involved."

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