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Comment: Re:Well... (Score 1) 336 336

I'm gonna have to go against the chorus and lay the blame at your feet, honestly. You left a booby trap for whoever rebooted that server at any point in the future. Had you removed the hard drive or put the machine into a donation pile, I could understand.

Say you get hit by a bus the next week and they hire a new sysadmin. A few days later he's asked to setup a new service and decides to repurpose that unused server. He connects it to the network, boots it, installs updates and new software . . . and then gets pulled onto some other task that takes a day. That night disaster strikes. Is it his fault for not ensuring there were no dangerous cron jobs left on the machine?

Perhaps, but it's much easier to disarm bombs you've designed rather than force the job onto some poor, unsuspecting sap. :)

Comment: Re:Sole provider? (Score 1) 246 246

But the reality is, most people do NOT have the luxury of having the time and resources to find the perfect job they love in order to work and make a living.

Certainly, but the author isn't asking what most people should do. He's been able to support his family for three years, and his wife has demonstrated the ability to learn Java and build enterprise software. I'm willing to bet she could transition to a related field (consulting, IT, a different language, etc.) quickly and with minimal additional training.

I see no point to rush immediately into the same type of job when a small investment could yield much better results for everyone.

Comment: Sole provider? (Score 2) 246 246

What part of

She is starting to think about refreshing her coding skills and looking for a job. . . . However, she is not very eager to go back to coding.

makes you think she wants her husband to be the sole provider? Is there something wrong with wanting a rewarding career that you're passionate about?

Comment: iOS users feel it (Score 1, Insightful) 307 307

I currently have a web radio transceiver front panel application that works on Linux, Windows, MacOS, Android, Amazon Kindle Fire, under Chrome, Firefox, or Opera. No porting, no software installation. See blog.algoram.com for details of what I'm writing.

The one unsupported popular platform? iOS, because Safari doesn't have the function used to acquire the microphone in the web audio API (and perhaps doesn't have other parts of that API), and Apple insists on handicapping other browsers by forcing them to use Apple's rendering engine.

I don't have any answer other than "don't buy iOS until they fix it".

Comment: Re:Randomness can't come from a computer program (Score 1) 64 64

Most of us do have a need to transmit messages privately. Do you not make any online purchases?

Yes, but those have to use public-key encryption. I am sure of my one-time-pad encryption because it's just exclusive-OR with the data, and I am sure that my diode noise is really random and there is no way for anyone else to predict or duplicate it. I can not extend the same degree of surety to public-key encryption. The software is complex, the math is hard to understand, and it all depends on the assumption that some algorithms are difficult to reverse - which might not be true.

Comment: Re:Bad RNG will make your crypto predictable (Score 2) 64 64

The problem with FM static is that you could start receiving a station, and if you don't happen to realize you are now getting low-entropy data, that's a problem.

There are many well-characterized forms of electronic noise: thermal noise, shot noise, avalanche noise, flicker noise, all of these are easy to produce with parts that cost a few dollars.

Comment: Randomness can't come from a computer program (Score 2, Interesting) 64 64

True randomness comes from quantum mechanical phenomena. Linux /dev/random is chaotic, yes, enough to seed a software "R"NG. But we can do better and devices to do so are cheap these days.

I wouldn't trust anything but diode noise for randomness. If I had a need to transmit messages privately, I'd only trust a one-time pad.

Comment: Re:I'm spending 60% of my monthly income on rent (Score 1) 939 939

Communism has been tried on a large scale - see Mao's Great Leap Forward.

Nope. That was a totalitarian socialist program pushing a collectivism that didn't work. Communism is a post-scarcity society and obviously scarcity was the thing Mao produced best.

Comment: Re:High fat? (Score 1) 244 244

Now if we stop talking about mice and start talking about people we can look at what the science has always shown. There are things called diseases of modern culture. As in indigenous people who don't eat like western cultures have low cancer and mental illness rates and no heart attacks.

Except that science has never shown that. Atherosclerosis has been found in mummies (not just from Egypt but also Peru, the southwest America, and the Aleutian Islands), and the idea that modern Inuit have low rates of heart disease was never evidence-based

Fats and proteins don't spike the blood sugar.

But protein does spike insulin.

What science actually shows is what it's always shown: a diet based around whole plant foods, high in fiber and moderate to low in fat and protein, is the most healthful for primates, including those weird bald ones.

Comment: Re:What's the score now? (Score 1) 77 77

I didn't actually work on GPUs very much at Pixar, the image computer I worked on was the grandfather of the SIMD image processing instructions on modern CPUs. What would become a GPU later on was a very expensive box from Silicon Graphics, I had one that cost at least a quarter Million dollars.

Comment: Re:What's the score now? (Score 5, Interesting) 77 77

If they actually told us how to program their microengines, something good might come of it. But they'll probably just BSD-license a list of numbers, as others have.

I liked writing bit-slice microcode at Pixar. I really could get every last bit of power out of the hardware.

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