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Comment: Re:The fuzzy line between hobby and job (Score 1) 211

Only four times as many fees so they can base their whole living off of socialist government entitlements is a joke.

And it's an established fact that trucks cause orders of magnitude as much damage as cars. Not four times. Face it, you're just wrong.

Comment: Re:The fuzzy line between hobby and job (Score 1) 211

Math: Can you even understand it?

Truck axle weight limit: 20,000 lb per axle.

Prius axle weight: 1600 lb per axle

Road damage is proportional to (20,000 / 1,600) ^ 4, or 24,400:1.

So the truck should pay $8,000,000 per year if the prius pays $328. Obviously, the Prius is getting overcharged and the truck undercharged.

Comment: Re:Implement locally? (Score 1) 140

by Greyfox (#48923585) Attached to: How One Small Company Blocked 15.1 Million Robocalls Last Year
There is no situation I could be in where an incoming call is important enough to warrant my immediate attention. There's a guy at work whose wife is expecting a baby, I assume he's made arrangements for immediate contact. Maybe his wife should have a talk with him about working for a company that lets him work from home.

The old asterisk voice menu system I used to run was pretty good at shutting down telemarketers and robocallers while still letting legitimate callers through. I don't think it'd be so easy to implement on an android phone, although it really should be. Maybe that phone Canonical is working on will have more open standards, but I'm not holding my breath.

Comment: Re:The fuzzy line between hobby and job (Score 1) 211

Your entire elaborate argument is based on a false premise.

As I said, the road damage is exponential with the weight. It is proportional to the axle weight to the fourth power.

Fuel economy is roughly linear with weight, or even less than linear (big rigs get much better MPG per ton than smaller vehicles). Therefore, fuel taxes don't begin to recover the extra costs of heavier vehicles.

Who has made the stupidest argument you've ever heard now? You might look in the mirror.

Comment: Re:This. SO MUCH This. (Score 2) 486

by rjh (#48901439) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Pascal Underrated?

This is true and good, so long as you're interested in making software that can be done entirely with existing technologies. As soon as you hit the brick wall of "but there isn't anything in the standard library that does this," you need the old graybeards who spent their entire careers making the standard libraries you rely on.

Speaking as one of them, the pay and hours are both good and it keeps me on the cutting edge of some fascinating technologies.

The common idea is that we over-40s who've been doing this professionally for 25+ years can't adapt to modern software dev practices. Quite the opposite, really. Mostly we're kept so busy that we don't have the time.

None of this is meant to disrespect what the younger generation does with (as you say) "connect the dots library calls". That code needs to be written, and it's best if it's written by smart people who care about their work. :)

Comment: Kentucky (Score 4, Funny) 120

by Greyfox (#48899393) Attached to: Fark's Drew Curtis Running For Governor of Kentucky
If you live outside of Kentucky you might only know them for their derby. What many people don't know is that Kentucky also makes some of the finest jelly around, and that many stores outside the state carry it. So if you've never had the experience, you should pop 'round to your local grocer and ask about Kentucky jelly today!

Comment: Re:The fuzzy line between hobby and job (Score 2) 211

Your hypotheses that road damage is caused solely by the pressure on the top few millimeters of the road is highly questionable. The Prius is not going to be pounding down through the structure of the concrete nearly as much as your super-duty pickup hauling a huge boat.

I do agree that big rigs should be paying drastically more in fees than they do. However, industry lobbyists will always trump common sense.

Comment: "Fewer crossbar resources"? (Score 1) 145

by Greyfox (#48896277) Attached to: NVIDIA Responds To GTX 970 Memory Bug
What kind of talk is that? We need to come up with some decent excuses for why Nvidia can't access the last 500M of RAM! I'm going to suggest that it's global warming! The video card was designed for a room temperature of less than 80 degrees Fahrenheit but ever since global warming, room temperatures have been warmer than that!

Comment: Yup (Score 2) 110

by Greyfox (#48896261) Attached to: Bomb Threats Via Twitter Partly Shut Down Atlanta's Hartsfield Airport
If they think the threat is designed to secure passenger/crew compliance for another 9/11 style attack, yeah, I think they would shoot down a civilian aircraft if it didn't respond to their orders. Of course, passengers and crew these days expect any such threat to result in another 9/11 style attack and have proven repeatedly that they will beat the shit out of and quite possibly kill anyone trying to pull shit on their airplane. So the fighter jet is still just multi-million-dollar dick waving. It's probably more to let terrorist organizations know that we will shoot a plane down if we have to, rather than because we expect that we'd actually have to.

Comment: Re:Not a fan (Score 2) 304

by Waffle Iron (#48893551) Attached to: Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

You need to go watch a local SCCA race. Lifting the inside rear wheel is normal.

Normal in a race.

Several makers, like VW and Mazda, even show their cars doing that in their ads.

"Closed course. Professional driver. Do not attempt."

On my Honda [yadda yadda rant rant]

Looks like you need to get a bumper sticker with Calvin pissing on a Honda.

Comment: Re:I have an even better idea (Score 1) 304

by Waffle Iron (#48893045) Attached to: Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

I do not approve of any system that will arbitrarily override my basic controls of the vehicle,

You do realize that most cars sold in the last couple of decades have computers that can override your inputs and monkey around with your brakes whenever you're trying to speed up or slow down the vehicle?

Comment: Re:Crash-testing & strength? (Score 1) 128

I'm sure this happens already, as kids often add absurd fins and wings to production cars, and then drive the modified abominations on public roads. But apparently I've been OK with this for my whole life, so I have no reason to worry about what will essentially be more of the same.

Comment: Working with state agencies in the '90s (Score 1) 189

by aussersterne (#48877153) Attached to: User Plea Means EISA Support Not Removed From Linux

I saw a lot of EISA systems. It was a reasonable performer and physically robust (not as sensitive as PCI cards to positioning in slots, etc.). I'd say that EISA hardware was generally of very good quality, but high-end enough that most consumers wouldn't run into it despite being a commodity standard, sort of like PCI-X.

The systems I had experience with were running Linux, even then. :-)

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