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Comment: Re:If you make this a proof of God... (Score 1) 594

What if your concept of absolute determinism as implied here is actually not absolute and has limitations?

Then it wouldn't be Conway's Game of Life, would it?

A person or two mentioned Conway's Game of Life. Unless I specifically say so, I am not binding myself to only mentioning that one thing and never moving on to any related ideas which happen to be outside its scope. And I didn't specifically say so. Therefore I see no value in pointing that out.

Comment: Re:This isn't news... (Score 1) 211

by causality (#46784435) Attached to: Click Like? You May Have Given Up the Right To Sue

This is probably more than just shit-slinging. The more reasons they have to create more paperwork and more time in court for an individual plaintiff, the more money it costs on both sides in legal fees. How much would it cost in legal fees to fight the validity of just this point of the EULA? They don't care if they lose the individual battle, they have much deeper pockets for legal fees than an individual, or even a class in a class-action lawsuit, so delaying and/or running the plaintiff out of money means winning the war.

Am I the only one who thinks the entire notion of a "class-action lawsuit" was a bad idea?

If a company materially harms 250,000 individuals, let them defend against 250,000 individual lawsuits. That would be a massive disincentive against harming people. Having to pay lawyers for that many separate lawsuits would be a lot more like the predicament (during a standard isolated case) of the one individual trying to have a legal battle against a huge multination corporation. Seems fair to me.

Plus in many class-action lawsuits, only the lawyers really win. The former customers might get a $10 coupon or something like that.

Comment: Re:so? (Score 1) 211

by causality (#46784315) Attached to: Click Like? You May Have Given Up the Right To Sue

They're different. You're actually signing (or clicking through) something with them. This sounds like they're trying to say if you like them on Facebook (no EULA pops up when you like something) that you can never sue them. This will never stand up in court.

Is there any chance that the lawyers who knowingly and intentionally come up with such ideas and try to implement them could be disbarred? Few measures would more effectively discourage the practice.

Comment: Re:The power of EULAs only goes so far (Score 1) 211

by causality (#46784295) Attached to: Click Like? You May Have Given Up the Right To Sue

It's no less trifling than the average Slashdot user obsessing over what operating system/software people choose to use.

The difference being, there is some chance the Slashdot user was actually involved in producing that software (or has enough expertise to competently discuss its merits and faults). There's also a chance they're responding to people who chose to use shoddy software when better alternatives were available, and are now complaining about the results.

Comment: Re:Drop Dropbox (Score 1) 446

by causality (#46784241) Attached to: Commenters To Dropbox CEO: Houston, We Have a Problem

A personal file server doesn't offer anything in the way of backup.

That depends on where it's located.

If you took it upon yourself to assume "right next to the machine being backed up" or "running on the same machine to be backed up" then don't ascribe to me your own assumption. It was no accident or omission that I said no such things.

It's also impractical for someone who doesn't have a system that runs 24/7.

Right, just like a pilot's license is useless to someone with no access to an aircraft. Personally I deal with that by running the file server 24/7. When you enable various power management options and have a clue about SSH and your favorite shell, it's really not a problem. If that doesn't describe you, find another solution. Simple and much more productive than complaining that there is no Final Ultimate Answer that is 100% suitable for all people at all times.

Comment: Re:ARM is the new Intel (Score 2) 109

by causality (#46772195) Attached to: Intel Pushes Into Tablet Market, Pushes Away From Microsoft

Intel-powered Android tablets can run almost all Android-ARM apps. Those that are native ARM apps are handled through binary translation. It works very well. I've used a Dell Venue 8 (Intel CloverTrail+ Android) and did not find any apps that wouldn't run just fine.

Is that done in hardware? Is there a performance penalty?

A related question about the programs you tried: were these computationally intensive games, or things like office apps and file managers?

Comment: Re:It was a "joke" back then (Score 2) 275

I actually think Jules Verne got a surprising number of things quite accurately. In fact, I seem to recall that his depiction of mid 20th century as less personal and more polluted got him into trouble with his publisher. He did not get all of the inventions 100% accurate, but he did have some pretty impressive hits as far as tone and atmosphere go.

Shachar

Comment: Re:So basically... (Score 1) 286

by Znork (#46748327) Attached to: Bachelor's Degree: An Unnecessary Path To a Tech Job

If he reached the same position as you did in with less effort, chances are he'll continue reaching the targets he has faster and with less effort. Learn from it, or you're going to be angry and resentful the rest of your career, and as the biggest companies in the industry are run by drop outs you may very well end up working for them.

Comment: Re:Drop Dropbox (Score 5, Insightful) 446

by causality (#46733039) Attached to: Commenters To Dropbox CEO: Houston, We Have a Problem

Try SpiderOak. Free 2 GB, zero-knowledge, secure. Works on a load of OSs and devices. I'm a completely satisfied customer.

Or ... get a free dynamic DNS hostname (there are still plenty available) and take a few minutes to learn about SSH/SFTP (and SSHGuard if you are using passwords) and set up your own personal file server. It doesn't have to allow shell access.

Now the companies can do whatever they want because you did the little bit of learning it took not to care.

Comment: Re:If you make this a proof of God... (Score 1) 594

Not if he gave them free willl, meaning even the ability to do things that were "outside" of the creator's will/temperament.

Can you explain what that means within the context of "THE DETERMINISTIC APPLICATION OF RULES", please? Because otherwise you are making zero sense whatsoever.

It makes perfect sense. What if your concept of absolute determinism as implied here is actually not absolute and has limitations? That's what he was saying, at least as I understood it. That would mean that some subset of everything would be steady, regular, unpredictable, and unsurprising. The rest wouldn't.

An analogy could be a program that takes certain actions based on the output of a high-quality random number generator of some kind. The compiled program code itself is completely deterministic, behaving as designed each time it is run. The randomness adds an unpredictable element; it determines which of the predetermined (that is, available or achievable) outcomes actually ends up happening. You can't break fundamental rules of physics but plenty of other things could play out in myriad ways.

Comment: Re:Doesn't seem to be on purpose (Score 1) 445

by causality (#46722719) Attached to: Heartbleed Coder: Bug In OpenSSL Was an Honest Mistake

The only people surprised by Snowden's leaks were people who had a false sense of security.

... caused by a false belief in an inherent benevolence of government, compounded by this denial-apathy thing concerning the casual lies coming from every major institution and corporation on a regular basis.

If you imagine for a moment that there were aliens observing the earth, you could not blame them for refusing to initiate first contact.

Comment: Re:where is the controversy? (Score 1) 639

by Sun (#46715421) Attached to: Scientists/Actress Say They Were 'Tricked' Into Geocentric Universe Movie

What I meant, and I'm fairly sure it wasn't as hard to understand as you make it out to be, is that you do not refrain from raising a true point merely because it seems to weaken your case.

If you do so, your best case is that you will be ignored, and your worst case is that you will be no more right than the people you are arguing with. Constraint yourself to making any and all relevant true points, and then pick up your opinion so that it is still correct. Otherwise, how do you know you are right?

Shachar

The longer you spend arguing with an idiot, the higher the chances he's doing the same thing.

Comment: Re:where is the controversy? (Score 1) 639

by Sun (#46714255) Attached to: Scientists/Actress Say They Were 'Tricked' Into Geocentric Universe Movie

TL;DR.

Seriously, though, I agree with your objectives, but not with your suggested methods.

I think the trend of never conceding anything for the sake of winning the argument is one that hurts our ability to conduct actual conversations. I also think that, when the numbers are tallied, it is a counter-productive one. People will see you as a zealot and disregard you. I refuse to participate in it.

Shachar

For every bloke who makes his mark, there's half a dozen waiting to rub it out. -- Andy Capp

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