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+ - Barometers in iPhones: Crowdsourcing weather forecasts 1

Submitted by cryptoz
cryptoz (878581) writes "Apple is now adding barometers to its mobile devices: both new iPhones have valuable atmospheric pressure sensors being used for HealthKit (step counting). Since many Android devices have been carrying barometers for years, scientists like Cliff Mass have been using the sensor data to improve weather forecasts. Open source data collection projects like PressureNet on Android automatically collect and send the atmospheric sensor data to researchers."

+ - Google changes 'to fight piracy' by highlighting legal sites

Submitted by mrspoonsi
mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "Google has announced changes to its search engine in an attempt to curb online piracy. The company has long been criticised for enabling people to find sites to download entertainment illegally. The entertainment industry has argued that illegal sites should be "demoted" in search results. The new measures, mostly welcomed by music trade group the BPI, will instead point users towards legal alternatives such as Spotify and Google Play. Google will now list these legal services in a box at the top of the search results, as well as in a box on the right-hand side of the page. Crucially, however, these will be adverts — meaning if legal sites want to appear there, they will need to pay Google for the placement."

+ - China is staging a nationwide attack on iCloud and Microsoft accounts ->

Submitted by DemonOnIce
DemonOnIce (3876631) writes "According to The Verge and original report from Great Fire , China is conducting a big scale attack on iCloud and Microsoft accounts using Great Firewall. Chinese users may be facing an unpleasant surprise, they directed to a dummy site designed like an Apple login page, and same thing happened with Microsoft accounts."
Link to Original Source

+ - Designing tomorrow's air traffic control systems

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "According to FAA estimates, increasing congestion in the air transportation system of the United States, if unaddressed, will cost the American economy $22 billion annually in lost economic activity by 2022. MIT researcher Hamsa Balakrishnan and her team are making air traffic control systems more efficient through a combination of better models and new embedded technologies. Testing their algorithms at Logan Airport in Boston, they showed that by holding aircraft back for 4.5 minutes, they could improve flow on the runways and save nearly 100 pounds of fuel for each aircraft."

+ - Early childhood neglect associated with altered brain structure, ADHD->

Submitted by vinces99
vinces99 (2792707) writes "Under the rule of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, thousands of Romanian children were placed in overcrowded orphanages with bleak conditions and minimal human contact, a legacy that continued even after the 1989 revolution. Only recently have research and public concern caused policy changes.

University of Washington research on children who began life in these institutions shows that early childhood neglect is associated with changes in brain structure. A paper published this month in Biological Psychiatry shows that children who spent their early years in these institutions have thinner brain tissue in cortical areas that correspond to impulse control and attention. “These differences suggest a way that the early care environment has dramatic and lasting effects for children’s functioning,” said lead author Katie McLaughlin, a UW assistant professor of psychology.

Since 2000, the Bucharest Early Intervention Project has worked to document and treat the children’s health. McLaughlin joined the team about six years ago to focus on brain development. This study is among the first in any setting to document how social deprivation in early life affects the thickness of the cortex, the thin folded layer of gray matter that forms the outer layer of the brain. The study provides “very strong support” for a link between the early environment and ADHD, McLaughlin said."

Link to Original Source

+ - Mozilla Teams Up With Humble Bundle To Offer Eight Plugin-Free Games

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Mozilla and Humble Bundle today announced a new package that features award-winning indie best-sellers for which gamers can choose how much they want to pay. Naturally called the Humble Mozilla Bundle, the package consists of eight games that have been ported to the Web. The first five games (Super Hexagon, AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome, Osmos, Zen Bound 2, and Dustforce DX) can cost you whatever you want. The next two (Voxatron and FTL: Faster Than Light) can be had if you beat the average price for the bundle. You can pay $8 or more to receive all of the above, plus the last game, Democracy 3. Previously, all of these indie games were available only on PC or mobile. Now they all work in browsers on Windows, Mac, and Linux without having to install any plugins."

+ - Data From Windows 10 Feedback Tool Exposes Problem Areas

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "Two weeks in, and already 1 million people have tried out Windows 10 Technical Preview, reports Microsoft, along with a nice stack of other stats and feedback. Only 36% of installations are occurring inside a virtual machine. 68% of Windows 10 Technical Preview users are launching more than 7 apps per day, with somewhere around 25% of testers using Windows 10 as their daily driver (26 app launches or more per day). With the help of Windows 10's built-in feedback tool, thousands of testers have made it very clear that Microsoft's new OS still has lots of irksome bugs and misses many much-needed features. ExtremeTech has posted an interesting list of the most popular gripes received, them mostly being various GUI endurances. What has your experience been with the Technical Preview?"

+ - Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Michelle Cottle reports in The Atlantic that in an earlier era, a suspicious husband might have rifled through his wife's pockets or hired a private investigator but today spouses have easy access to an array of sophisticated spy software that that record every keystroke; compile detailed logs of calls, texts, and video chats; that track a phone’s location in real time; recover deleted messages from all manner of devices (without having to touch said devices); and that turn phones into wiretapping equipment. One might assume that the proliferation of such spyware would have a chilling effect on extramarital activities. But according to Cottle, aspiring cheaters, need not despair: software developers are also rolling out ever stealthier technology to help people conceal their affairs. Right or wrong, cheating apps tap into a potentially lucrative market and researchers regard the Internet as fertile ground for female infidelity in particular. “Men tend to cheat for physical reasons and women for emotional reasons,” says Katherine Hertlein. “The Internet facilitates a lot of emotional disclosure and connections with someone else.”

But virtual surveillance has its risks. Stumbling across an incriminating email your partner left open is one thing; premeditated spying can land you in court. A Minnesota man named Danny Lee Hormann, suspecting his wife of infidelity, installed a GPS tracker on her car and allegedly downloaded spyware onto her phone and the family computer. In March 2010, Hormann's wife had a mechanic search her car and found the tracker. She called the police, and Hormann spent a month in jail on stalking charges. “I always tell people two things: (1) do it legally, and (2) do it right,” says John Paul Lucich, a computer-forensics expert and the author of Cyber Lies, a do-it-yourself guide for spouses looking to become virtual sleuths. Lucich has worked his share of ugly divorces, and he stresses that even the most damning digital evidence of infidelity will prove worthless in court—and potentially land you in trouble—if improperly gathered. His blanket advice: Get a really good lawyer."

Comment: Media hype (Score 1) 949

by Major Byte (#36368754) Attached to: Is There a New Geek Anti-Intellectualism?
The claim of "a lot of Internet geeks and digerati have sounded many puzzlingly anti-intellectual" does not pass the litmus test. A great deal of learning (self and/or formal education) is needed, and not just intellectual skills but also diligent effort.

On the other hand, those that claim to be a computer expert because they can run a mail merge from Word, or copy an Excel macro from a website, or talk l33t, these people might abase intellectual effort because they make none. Posers, in a word.

This would not be the first time a few flashy shallow loudmouths are embraced by the news media as a trend. After all, no news sells no newspapers (or web site adverts).

Comment: Re:Terrorists? Probably not. Nor unions! (Score 1) 461

by Major Byte (#27680663) Attached to: A Cyber-Attack On an American City

Lets not all go blaming terrorist organizations on this one. ... My money is on unionized workers facing layoffs or payroll cuts.

What about a company that specializes in hardening network infrastructure? They have concerns about payroll cuts AND increasing share holder value!

I won't suggest government agencies interested in expanding the "theater of security" because I don't have my tinfoil hat on.

Whenever a system becomes completely defined, some damn fool discovers something which either abolishes the system or expands it beyond recognition.

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