Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - Enabling a new future for cloud computing

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The National Science Foundation today announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing testbeds — to be called "Chameleon" and "CloudLab" — that will enable the academic research community to experiment with novel cloud architectures and pursue new, architecturally-enabled applications of cloud computing. While most of the original concepts for cloud computing came from the academic research community, as clouds grew in popularity, industry drove much of the design of their architecture. Today's awards complement industry's efforts and enable academic researchers to advance cloud computing architectures that can support a new generation of innovative applications, including real-time and safety-critical applications like those used in medical devices, power grids, and transportation systems."

+ - Can our computers continue to get smaller and more powerful?->

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "In a review article in this week's issue of the journal Nature (described in a National Science Foundation press release), Igor Markov of the University of Michigan/Google reviews limiting factors in the development of computing systems to help determine what is achievable, in principle and in practice, using today's and emerging technologies. "Understanding these important limits," says Markov, "will help us to bet on the right new techniques and technologies.""
Link to Original Source

+ - Enhancing Safety and Security in a Digital World

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "As our lives and businesses become ever more intertwined with networked technologies, the nation must continue to improve cybersecurity measures to keep our data, devices and critical systems safe, private and accessible. Yesterday, the National Science Foundation announced two new center-scale "Frontier" awards that address grand challenges in cybersecurity. In particular, they'll support research into modular cloud computing security and "program obfuscation," where an entire program (and not just its output) are encrypted. The awards are part a diverse $74.5 million portfolio that includes more than 225 new projects in 39 states."

+ - Taking Great Ideas from the Lab to the Fab->

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The "valley of death" is well-known to entrepreneurs — the lull between government funding for research and industry support for prototypes and products. To confront this problem, in 2013 the National Science Foundation created a new program called InTrans to extend the life of the most high-impact NSF-funded research and help great ideas transition from lab to practice.Today, in partnership with Intel, NSF announced the first InTrans award of $3 million to a team of researchers who are designing customizable, domain-specific computing technologies for use in healthcare. The work could lead to less exposure to dangerous radiation during x-rays by speeding up the computing side of medicine. It also could result in patient-specific cancer treatments."
Link to Original Source

+ - Computing a Cure for HIV->

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The tendency of HIV to mutate and resist drugs has made it particularly difficult to eradicate. But in the last decade scientists have begun using a new weapon in the fight against HIV: supercomputers. Using some of the nation's most powerful supercomputers, teams of researchers are pushing the limits of what we know about HIV and how we can treat it. The Huffington Post describes nine ways supercomputers are helping scientists understand and treat the disease."
Link to Original Source

+ - A High Performance First Year for Stampede->

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Sometimes, the laboratory just won't cut it. After all, you can't recreate an exploding star, manipulate quarks, or forecast the climate in the lab. In cases like these, scientists rely on supercomputing simulations to capture the physical reality of these phenomena — minus the extraordinary cost, dangerous temperatures or millennium-long wait times. This week, the Texas Advanced Computing Center released a Special Report on Stampede, the 7th most powerful computing system in the world. The report describes 8 example of how scientists are using the supercomputer to make discoveries in genetics, hurricane forecasting, renewable fuels and other fields."
Link to Original Source

+ - The Internet's broken. Who's going to invent a new one?-> 1

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "The Internet has evolved to support an incredibly diverse set of needs, but we may be reaching a point at which new solutions and new infrastructure are needed in particular to improve security, connect with the Internet of Things and address an increasingly mobile computing landscape. Today, NSF announced $15 million in awards to develop, deploy and test future Internet architecture in challenging real-world environments. These clean-slate designs explore novel network architectures and networking concepts and also consider the larger societal, economic and legal issues that arise from the interplay between the Internet and society.

Each project will partner with cities, non-profit organizations, academic institutions and industrial partners across the nation to test their Internet architectures. Some of the test environments include: a vehicular network deployment in Pittsburgh, a context-aware weather emergency notification system for Dallas/Fort Worth, and a partnership with Open mHealth, a patient-centric health ecosystem based in San Francisco."

Link to Original Source

+ - Computer Model Helps Benin Vaccinate More Kids at Lower Cost->

Submitted by Ken Chiacchia
Ken Chiacchia (3651833) writes "Computer modeling has helped the Republic of Benin in West Africa determine how to bring more lifesaving vaccines to its children while adding the sorely needed vaccine for rotavirus, a major killer of children in low-income nations. The Hermes Logistics Modeling Team reports its findings this month in the journal Vaccine . Results from the HERMES model, designed by researchers at Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), the University of Pittsburgh School of Engineering and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, have helped Benin’s Ministry of Health pilot successful changes in their vaccine delivery system, says first author Shawn T. Brown of PSC. The government is now considering enacting those changes nation-wide, which could save them $500,000 through 2017 while vaccinating 99 to 100 percent of their children."
Link to Original Source

+ - Making graphene work for real-world devices->

Submitted by aarondubrow
aarondubrow (1866212) writes "Graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the carbon material graphite, is strong, light, nearly transparent and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat, but a number of practical challenges must be overcome before it can emerge as a replacement for silicon in electronics or energy devices. One particular challenge concerns the question of how graphene diffuses heat, in the form of phonons. Thermal conductivity is critical in electronics, especially as components shrink to the nanoscale. Using the Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, Professor Li Shi simulated how phonons (heat-carrying vibrations in solids) scatter as a function of the thickness of the graphene layers. He also investigated how graphene interacts with substrate materials and how phonon scattering can be controlled. The results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Applied Physical Letters and Energy and Environmental Science."
Link to Original Source

+ - Commercial quantum computers made possible by qubit reliability breakthrough ->

Submitted by rofkool
rofkool (3603105) writes "Scientists at the University of California Santa Barbara have demonstrated a new level of qubit reliability that could herald the dawn of commercial quantum computing. Their research demonstrated a 99% level of qubit reliability, addressing one of the fundamental problems faced in the development of quantum computers for practical purposes. The findings could prove useful in furthering the applications of quantum computing for a variety of purposes, including economic systems, the environment, medicine and even space exploration."
Link to Original Source

+ - DIY Wearable Pi with Near-Eye Video Glasses->

Submitted by coop0030
coop0030 (263345) writes "Noe & Pedro Ruiz at Adafruit have created a pair of open source near-eye video glasses combined with a Raspberry Pi. Their 3D Printed design turns a pair of 'private display glasses' into a "google glass"-like form factor. It easily clips to your prescription glasses, and can display any kind of device with Composite Video like a Raspberry Pi. They have a video demonstrating the glasses, a tutorial on how to build them, along with the 3d files required to print it out."
Link to Original Source

+ - Punching Mantis Shrimp Inspires Super-Tough Composites->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "A new lightweight, super strong material has been discovered thanks to one of nature’s most violent sociopaths. The peacock mantis shrimp may look like a colorful, reasonably mild-mannered aquarium dweller, but its claws have the punch of a .22 bullet. A team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, has developed a carbon composite that imitates the claw’s structure. The result is a promising new material that may one day be used to build cars and airplanes."
Link to Original Source

+ - New Shape Born From Rubber Bands->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Physicists playing with rubber bands have discovered a new shape. In an attempt to create a spring that replicates the light-bending properties of cuttlefish ink sacs, a team of researchers suspended two rubber strips of different lengths. Connecting the bottoms of the two strips to a cup of water, the shorter band stretched to the same length as the longer one. After gluing the two stretched strips together, the researchers gradually drained the water from the cup. As the bands retracted and twisted from the reduced strain, the researchers were shocked to see the formation of a hemihelix with multiple rainbow-shaped boundaries called perversions. The team hopes their work inspires nanodevices and molecules that twist and transform from flat strips into predetermined 3D shapes on demand."
Link to Original Source

+ - Alzheimer's and cancer link found, thanks to supercomputers->

Submitted by jorge_salazar
jorge_salazar (3562633) writes "Cancer and Alzheimer's disease appear to have an inverse relationship. If you have one disease, you're less likely to get the other. Using supercomputers, Houston-based scientists have discovered a molecular-level missing link in the cell signaling pathways between the two dreaded diseases."
Link to Original Source

Whatever is not nailed down is mine. Whatever I can pry up is not nailed down. -- Collis P. Huntingdon, railroad tycoon

Working...