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Comment: Slashdot Media Trains Users to Malware Install (Score -1, Offtopic) 39

by Khyber (#49800075) Attached to: MIT Trains Robots To Jump

http://slashdot.org/submission...

http://slashdot.org/submission...

http://slashdot.org/submission...

And then they get caught LYING about it.

SourceForge/Slashdot Media is saying the project was abandoned in 2013. GIMP for Windows is constantly updated on a SLOW RELEASE CYCLE. We're talking a minimum of 5-6 months before any worthwhile incremental update. The updates through 2014 and this year show as much, plus any look at prior release cycles shows the same, with a period of almost ONE YEAR as a maximum update time. (That one was 11 months.)

Yet the account is suddenly handled by SF-Editor1.

Give me a fucking break, Slashdot. Do you REALLY want me to show where CentOS fails in security?

I can give the internet every detail of your database, because you're too stupid to keep it properly encrypted.

That includes who meta-moderated what. That means we can figure out your agenda.

Comment: Re:Is this where SF jumps the shark? (Score 1) 11

"According to the gimp-win developer, they locked him out of his account. So Sourceforge is rather confident he wont be making further updates. Of course that's more of a hijacking than an abandonment."

Bingo. GIMP has a SLOW release cycle.

SourceForge is trying to monetize the work of people that do it for free.

And for that, every SourceForge operator needs to get their ass handed to them.

It's time for a new GPL that Forbids this kind of bullshit.

And if Stallman can't get it done, he's fucking worthless.

Here's the real test - can the most staunch supporter of open source come up with such a contract?

Not likely so. He's too busy fellating himself.

Comment: Re:Hilarious! (Score 1) 179

by TheRaven64 (#49798705) Attached to: Chinese Nationals Accused of Taking SATs For Others

The same is true of university exams. My undergraduate exams, for example, mostly required that you answer two of three questions per exam. To get a first (for people outside the UK: the highest classification), you needed to get 70%. Most questions were around 40% knowledge and 60% application of the knowledge. If you could predict the topics that the examiner would pick, then that meant that you could immediately discard a third of the material. To get the top grade, you needed to get 100% in one question and 40% in another. This meant that you could understand a third of the material really well and understand another third well enough to get the repetition marks, but not the understanding ones and still get the top grade. This meant that you could study 50% of the material and still do very well in the exams, as long as you picked the correct 50%. And some of the lecturers were very predictable when setting exams...

Comment: Re:Doesn't get it (Score 1) 243

What jobs do you imagine existing in 10-20 years that don't require some understanding of programming? I thought my stepfather, as head greenskeeper at a golf course might have had one before he retired, but it turns out that the irrigation system that he had to use came with a domain-specific programming language for controlling it. A lot of farm equipment is moving in the same direction. Office jobs generally require either wasting a lot of time, or learning a bit of scripting (hint: the employees who opt for the first choice are not going to be the ones that keep their jobs for long). Jobs that don't require any programming are the ones that are easy to automate.

But, of course, we don't need to teach our children to write. After all, they can always hire a scribe if they need to and there really aren't enough jobs for scribes to justify teaching it to everyone.

Comment: Re:Impractical (Score 1) 533

by TheRaven64 (#49798347) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage
Why would I be stuck with the connector? For one thing, you can easily install adaptors - even if you'd rolled out USB A or B sockets, they'd still be supported everywhere and you can buy adaptors very cheaply. The main problem with a USB A socket (which is really the only one of the previous ones that you'd consider for charging) is the low power - it can only provide about 10W, even if you have some adaptor. USB C can provide 100W, and 100W seems like enough for a DC supply for quite a while.

But if I'd rolled out USB A sockets in 1995, I don't think I'd object strongly to replacing the faceplates on the sockets with USB C ones in the next five years, if the wires in the wall could supply the required power.

I have yet to see a USB-C connector yet, and I am usually a first adopter.

No one you know has a MacBook Air? Most of the next generation of mobiles are going to have USB C (Apple and Google are among the bigger backers), so expect to see a lot of them appearing.

Comment: Re:Important Question: WHICH DC? (Score 1) 533

by TheRaven64 (#49798309) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage
If you connect one of these to the existing AC main, then you're just moving the well wart into the socket. You still have one AC to DC converter for each device, and that particular device can only provide 2.1A at 5V, which is well below what USB-C supports (no charging a MacBook Air from it, for example).

Comment: Re:Heh. (Score 1) 243

by rtb61 (#49795963) Attached to: How a Scientist Fooled Millions With Bizarre Chocolate Diet Claims

Main stream media routinely lies to people not just in the advertising it sells but now in not-news it peddles. Those liars do not do nothing for free. That time gap between the report release and spreading the lies, time enough to approach candy corporations with spend some more on advertising and we will spread this not-news story far and wide.

Reality, people want to hear the truth from news, not more lies, ask people what they want to hear and by far the majority will say the 'TRUTH'. Forget the lies about main stream media saying they tell people what they want to hear, they tell the majority of people the lies a minority of people pay to be told. A more treasonous bunch you could not expect to find anywhere than in the corporate boardrooms of media empires.

Comment: Re:instead of space race (Score 1) 255

by rtb61 (#49795887) Attached to: Neil DeGrasse Tyson Urges America To Challenge China To a Space Race

A major space race provides many things. Amongst them a focus for national pride, a chance for individuals and organisations to excel, and access to a whole universe beyond the earth. Players in the race, the US, Europe, Russia, China and, India. This could of course expand. Better far more efficient launch systems are becoming accessible and their use will spread.

The alternate to focusing on a space race, the continued Hollywood driven focus on our genitals and poseur wealth status required to gain access to other peoples genitals. So space race or genital race (lets not pretend the extreme wealth disparity of capitalism is about anything else, as leading example the US paedophile billionaire renting out children to members of the British monarchy).

Comment: Re:Just wondering (Score 4, Insightful) 216

by rtb61 (#49795829) Attached to: Why Detecting Drones Is a Tough Gig

Taking into account size, altitude, a simple sonar detection fence works the best. Sonar units firing vertically completely surrounding the facility to detect all incoming flying objects and then the use of suitable rapidly decomposing shot fired from a compressed air shotgun to bring it down, this to prevent excessive collateral damage of the human variety. Birds are another matter, they will end up killing all that cross the sonar detection fence. So that mess will need to be continuously cleaned up. High altitude drones require additional deployment of sonar detection equipment firing at an angle over the structure to be protected. Heavier drones of course means accepting collateral damage, screw the public save the rich and greedy and their political puppets.

Comment: Re:Really, Guys? (Score 1) 63

by rtb61 (#49795687) Attached to: Live Anthrax Shipped Accidentally To S Korea and US Labs

Reminds me of typical plausible deniability. Accidentally let out some undeniably US military weapons grade anthrax, so that some can disappear before the rest is recovered and then be used in a false flag event. So Jade Helm, the occupation of hostile cities with the active suppression and elimination of an opposed civilian population and now the wandering around of false flag fit material to prompt the US of Jade Helm training. So hmm, Ukraine, Iran or Venezuela, of course Jade Helm, (green as in jungle and helm as in control, tends to point to training to control a hostile Venezuelan population). They have made a huge mess in Europe, a major cock up in the middle east and so now it seems to be back to playing in South America because Brazil in BRICS (what is interesting about BRICS as a side note, is all the members are non English speakers yet the title is distinctly english).

Comment: Re:What ./ doesnt want you to know (Score 1) 32

by rtb61 (#49795611) Attached to: GoPro's Next Adventure: Virtual Reality and Drones

I would like to congratulate Slashdot for letting it happen rather than trying to stifle it. People have to remember in every organisation there will always be psychopaths attempting to subvert it for their own personal benefit under a masquerade of the greater good.

Back to topic, Go Pro seems to be in a rush to grab profits fast before the ban they are accelerating kicks in. I wonder if this is not some subtle marketing move to accelerate the ban on drone because they have no money in it. So imply the threat of millions of drones in the sky spying on everyone all of the time and interfering with road and air traffic, accelerate the ban, so as to favour vehicle and person mounted Go Pro devices.

Kiss your keyboard goodbye!

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