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+ - First Ultraviolet Quantum Dots Shine In An LED->

Submitted by ckwu
ckwu writes: Researchers in South Korea have made the first quantum dots that emit ultraviolet light and used them to make a flexible, light-emitting diode. Until now, no one had succeeded in making quantum dots that emit wavelengths shorter than about 400 nm, which marks the high end of the UV spectrum. To get quantum dots that emit UV, the researchers figured out how make them with light-emitting cores smaller than 3 nm in diameter. They did it by coating a light-emitting cadmium zinc selenide nanoparticle with a zinc sulfide shell, which caused the core to shrink to 2.5 nm. The quantum dots give off true UV light, at 377 nm. An LED made with the quantum dots could illuminate the anticounterfeiting marks on a paper bill. If their lifetimes can be improved, these potentially low-cost UV LEDs could find uses in counterfeit currency detection, water sterilization, and industrial applications.
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+ - Mandriva CEO: Employee lawsuits put us out of business->

Submitted by Julie188
Julie188 writes: As you probably heard by now, Linux company Mandriva has finally, officially gone out of business. The CEO has opened up, telling his side of the story. He blames employee lawsuits after a layoff in 2013, the French labor laws and the courts. "Those court decisions forced the company to announce bankruptcy," he said.
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+ - Hacking Your Body Through a Nerve in Your Neck-> 1

Submitted by agent elevator
agent elevator writes: IEEE Spectrum has a feature (part of it's Hacking the Human OS issue) on the future of vagus nerve stimulation, a device-based therapy with the potential to treat a ridiculously wide variety of ailments: epilepsy, depression, stroke, tinnitus, heart failure, migraines, asthma, the list goes on. One problem is that, because it required an implant (a bit like a pacemaker), it was never anybody's first-choice therapy. But now there's a non-invasive version, a device you just hold to your neck twice a day for a few minutes that's being trialed first for migraines and cluster headaches (which sound horrible). If it works, vagus nerve stimulation could compete directly with drug treatments on cost and convenience and it would let doctors find new ways to hack human physiology.
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+ - Does a black hole have a shape? 1

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang writes: When you think about a black hole, you very likely think about a large amount of mass, pulled towards a central location by the tremendous force of gravity. While black holes themselves may be perfectly spherical (or for rotating black holes, almost perfectly spherical), there are important physical cases that can cause them to look tremendously asymmetrical, including the possession of an accretion disk and, in the most extreme case, a merger with another black hole.

+ - Land Art Park Significantly Reduces Jet Engine Noise Near Airport

Submitted by ClockEndGooner
ClockEndGooner writes: A study conducted by the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research [TNO] found that low frequency and long wavelength jet engine droning noise was significantly reduced in the fall after farmers ploughed their fields near Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, as the remaining furrows "had multiple ridges to absorb the sound waves, deflected the sound and muted the noise." This lead to the development of the Buitenschot Land Art Park, a buffer park featuring "land art" that has significantly reduced aircraft noise without requiriung cuts in the number of allowed flights in and out of the airport. The land art park has also provided neighbors with additional recreational paths and sports fields in the same space. The impact of the Land Art Park is covered in a recent article from The Smithsonian Magazine.

+ - Science Generally Astonished Over Lack of Holes

Submitted by TheRealHocusLocus
TheRealHocusLocus writes: "Holes in Swiss Cheese, expect we do," Yoda says. Tipped off by an alarming increase in cheese, agrarians at Agroscope scoped out the true reason why holes were becoming almost wholly absent from modern Swiss. One hundred years after William Clark famously ascribed them to carbon dioxide bubbles, and one CT scan later — nothing was observed — forming around tiny particles, whose composition should be studied more closely, for they are referred to obliquely as 'udder-hay'. Where has the carbon dioxide gone? Has it disappeared into the oceans, to re-emerge as missing heat? To counter a general lack of astonishment in modern Science reporting, the story is being heralded with the unbridled enthusiasm of an ancient mystery revealed. Google News has assigned this easy-to-remember ID d-e_cnlKUED1nWMhdSuG4PdO1KTwM to help track silly headlines. The phenomenon has also released a flood of disturbing press images.

+ - Ask Slashdot: When we perfect age reversing, how do we decide who gets to live? 4

Submitted by ourlovecanlastforeve
ourlovecanlastforeve writes: With biologists getting closer and closer to reversing the aging process in human cells, the reality of greatly extended life draws closer. This brings up a very important conundrum: You can't tell people not to reproduce and you can't kill people to preserve resources and space. Even at our current growth rate there's not enough for everyone. Not enough food, not enough space, not enough medical care. If — no, when — age reversal becomes a reality, who gets to live? And if everyone gets to live, how will we provide for them?

+ - FCC Proposes To Extend So-Called "Obamaphone" Program To Broadband->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh writes: The FCC's Lifeline program subsidizes phone service for very poor Americans; it gained notoriety under the label "Obamaphone," even though the program started under Reagan and was extended to cell phones under Clinton. Now the FCC is proposing that the program, which is funded by a fee on telecom providers, be extended to broadband, on the logic that high-speed internet is as necessary today as telephone service was a generation ago.
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+ - GoPro Drone Coming in 2016, Will Sync to Cloud->

Submitted by stowie
stowie writes: Rumors have been swirling for some time that GoPro was developing a drone. Well, now it's official. Speaking at the Code Conference, GoPro CEO Nick Woodman announced the company’s plans to come out with a quadcopter in the first half of 2016. Woodman said “the quad is in some ways the ultimate GoPro accessory,” adding that the company is testing software that will wirelessly sync up GoPro footage to the cloud.
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+ - Untried murder accusations weigh on Ross Ulbricht's Silk Road sentencing->

Submitted by Patrick O'Neill
Patrick O'Neill writes: Ross Ulbricht has never been tried for murder but tomorrow, when the convicted Silk Road creator is sentenced to prison, murder will be on the mind of the judge. Despite never filing murder for hire charges, New York federal prosecutors have repeatedly pushed for harsh sentencing because of, they told the judge, Ulbricht solicited multiple murders. The judge herself recently referred to Ulbricht's "commission of murders-for-hire" in a letter about the sentencing, painting an even grimmer picture of Ulbricht's sentencing prospects.
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+ - New Freescale i.MX6 SoCs Include IoT-focused UltraLite->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru writes: Freescale announced three new versions of its popular i.MX6 SoCs, including new DualPlus and QuadPlus parts featuring enhanced GPUs and expanded memory support, and a new low-end, IoT focused 528MHz UltraLite SoC that integrates a more power-efficient, single-core ARM Cortex-A7 architecture. The UltraLite, which will be available in a tiny 9x9mm package, is claimed by Freescale to be the smallest and most energy-efficient ARM based SoC. It has a stripped-down WXGA interface but adds new security, tamper detection, and power management features. All the new Freescale i.MX6 SoCs are supported with Linux BSPs and evaluation kits.
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+ - Sourceforge staff takes over a user's account and wraps their software installer-> 11

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Sourceforge staff took over the account of the GIMP-for-Windows maintainer claiming it was abandoned and used this opportunity to wrap the installer in crapware. Quoting Ars:

SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.


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