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Comment: Infrastructure (Score 1) 240

1 Conduit lots of it all back to a utilities room. Fill with cat 6 or better today. Your going to want one end point per wall in a room plus some ceiling/wall mounts for Wifi.
2 Home automation, zwave has gotten cheap but pick your poison of standards. While I do not find colors that useful being able to have different temp whites is gear mid winter etc. Remember that LED are flexible in placement indirect lighting is often much more pleasant. If your just looking to prep the main stumbling block tends to be small electrical work boxes and lack of a common through the box.
3 Insulation if you have the cash closed cell foam along with an air to air heat exchanger.
4 Heating, geothermal it's power use is electric so ties well with solar. Radiant floor is the nicest.
5 Hot Water, geothermal ng/propane backup
6 Power, pretty much put up as big a solar array as you can get on the roof, Couple this with a propane/ng gen set. Propane is the only thing you can store locally for an extended period. When they stop buying power back and retail rates plan space for a battery.
7 Kitchen ng/propane except for the oven.
8 Cooling, geothermal. Make sure that the system can de/humidify the house without heating/cooling it.
9 Electrical, AFCI's are generally code use them wherever possible. Insure that as much as feasible is home run back to the panel. Install more than the code minimum outlets. For example my desk area was run with 4 30a 110v feeds, It was trivial to replace one of them with a 240v 30a and I watched my heaviest power consumption are drop 5% so less heat to cool etc etc.
10 CCTV pretty much just more cat 6 going to enough points so you get 360 coverage with overlap. Some people like camera's in their home I'm not a fan.

Comment: Re:Just why is 10G ethernet still so expensive? (Score 1) 170

I'm not buying that.

One, for all desktops 100Mbit is STILL "good enough". When I look at performance graphs for even mid-sized companies, it's really unusual for a gig switch stack's uplink LAG to show much more than 40-50 mbits/sec, and even when it does those are weird peaks, the average is far lower. Even servers are usually lower, outside of backup windows or unusual activity.

Two, the amount of time between GigE availability and the availability of fairly cheap switches and NICs was pretty short, certainly shorter than the gap between GigE and 10 GigE.

Comment: Re:Why is this on Slashdot? (Score 1) 246

by ADRA (#49832373) Attached to: Why Is It a Crime For Dennis Hastert To Evade Government Scrutiny?

You seem to indicate that these two futures are somehow mutually exclusive.

  transparent, efficient, and accountable

All of which are different, but lets break them down:
Transparent: Yes, the US government is going extremely down the wrong path, though mostly involving strong-arming other nations through secret negotiations, and the fact that you can be tried, sentenced, and convicted for crimes you didn't even know existed. That's pretty facist.

Efficient: The vast amounts of money the US gov spends are relating to milliary growth, sustenance, pensions, and debt. All the others (from a macro level) are relatively core. Democrats or Republicans, there's little chance that the government will ever get much leaner per GDP. That said, the only people that bitch about efficiency in government are the same fronteersmen / libertarian ideals that will never come back (baring a nut job with nukes mind you), because quite frankly most people enjoy comfort over self-reliance, and that won't be something you will ever change (unless you find some nukes lying around).

Accountable: Well, I see this article being a boon for accountability. The government is made up of people, and a high ranking person of said government was found to (alledgedly) commit a serious crime. The guily are punished. I can't see this being a bad thing, unless you're saying bad people that break laws shouldn't be punished. Next time we have a global financial meltdown due to bad actors breaking the law, or the pick pocket for stealing your wallet, just don't flip your opinion. Hypocracy is a taint.

Comment: There is a little hope (Score 1) 114

by Ilgaz (#49829695) Attached to: nmap Maintainer Warns He Doesn't Control nmap SourceForge Mirror

Their parent Dice holdings should start an internal investigation and find&fire the suits who led to this scandal. They should also hire a person who will oversee such decisions.

They may also suggest a fire&forget, respectable spyware cleaner (malwarebytes, spybot or even ms windows defender) to users.

Or they better backup the site, sudo shutdown -f now

Comment: Re:Odd thoughts: (Score 1) 258

by swb (#49829021) Attached to: Microsoft To Support SSH In Windows and Contribute To OpenSSH

It's also nice for administering Microsoft stuff like Exchange, both as a shell and scripting engine.

It's not just nice, it's become mandatory as Microsoft strips development resources from the Exchange GUI, either to just save money or to force SMBs into Office365 because they've made basic Exchange management/configuration onerous to novice admins.

Comment: Cook's being gay influence his privacy stance? (Score 0) 153

by swb (#49828975) Attached to: Tim Cook: "Weakening Encryption Or Taking It Away Harms Good People"

I'm sure I'll take a beating for this, but I wonder if Cook's being gay -- and not being completely "out" until relatively recently -- have some influence on this thinking about privacy?

If you think about it, someone who is gay and had been less than publicly out about it has had a period of their life where they were pretty intense about guarding their personal privacy, especially someone in a high profile corporate job where there are plenty of people inside and outside of the company who would want to take you down.

And not to say that his homosexuality is the only explanation, he's obviously intelligent and presents the case for privacy and encryption in principled, intellectual terms.

Sure, it doesn't explain everything. Straight CEOs also support encryption and not always because they have secret drug/hooker/mistress/etc issued to hide, too.

But it's also works as a counter-explanation, CEOs who may not have had a deep interest in their personal privacy may have less personal association with privacy and may fall for the trap of "I have nothing to hide" and "It only helps criminals" or other deferential logic where they see granting government access as reasonable.

Comment: Re: Signs you are in trouble (Score 1) 153

by frdmfghtr (#49828957) Attached to: Tim Cook: "Weakening Encryption Or Taking It Away Harms Good People"

"Keeping servers fully blind as to the data they're working with is an open field of academic research. It's not something that Google or Facebook or Twitter or DropBox or whoever are holding back from because they hate privacy. It's just a really hard problem."

How is this a hard problem? The Spideroak cloud storage service does this; uploaded files are encrypted before they leave your machine. Even the file names are secret; the servers have zero knowledge of the file's name or type or contents.

+ - Sourceforge Hijacks the Nmap Sourceforge Account-> 1

Submitted by vivaoporto
vivaoporto writes: Gordon Lyon (better known as Fyodor, author of nmap and maintainer of the internet security resource sites insecure.org, nmap.org, seclists.org, and sectools.org) warns on the nmap development mailing list that the Sourceforge Nmap account was hijacked from him.

According to him the old Nmap project page (located at http://sourceforge.net/projects/nmap/, screenshot) was changed to a blank page and its contents were moved to a new page (http://sourceforge.net/projects/nmap.mirror/, screenshot) which controlled by sf-editor1 and sf-editor3, in pattern mirroring the much discussed the takeover of GIMP-Win page discussed last week on Ars Technica, IT World and eventually this week Slashdot.

That happens after Sourceforge promises to stop "presenting third party offers for unmaintained SourceForge projects. At this time, we present third party offers only with a few projects where it is explicitly approved by the project developer, or if the project is already bundling third party offers."

To their credit Fyodor states that "So far they seem to be providing just the official Nmap files (as long as you don't click on the fake download buttons) and we haven't caught them trojaning Nmap the way they did with GIMP" but reiterates "that you should only download Nmap from our official SSL Nmap site: https://nmap.org/download.html"

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