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Comment: Re:1.2 what? (Score 1) 153

Budget cutbacks.

In careful consideration of this, and in light of the seriousness of the problem, I have determined that the appropriate reaction is to seize Canada. I'm pretty sure that congress will determine the commerce clause covers it, anyway. I'm writing my crook^w legislator this evening.

Comment: Re:Storage (Score 1) 155

by sjames (#49169563) Attached to: World's First Lagoon Power Plants Unveiled In UK

Actually, they will have some ability to decide when to generate the power. For example, if none is needed at the start of high tide they can close the gates. Then as demand grows they can open them wide. Presuming sufficiently large gates, they could do that and still capture maximum power for that cycle.

Same holds true as the tide goes out.

Since the energy input is free and never ending, they just need to do a cost/benefit analysis. If the storage is more expensive than the potential energy gains, they can just let some of the water flow freely.

Comment: Re:Did *everyone* miss the point here? :-( (Score 1) 364

by Anonymous Brave Guy (#49166827) Attached to: Google Wants To Rank Websites Based On Facts Not Links

It remains the case that either my original statement is true, meaning a counter-example for the reliability of fact-based ranking has been identified, or my original statement is false, in which case the statement itself becomes a counter-example because it is widely repeated but incorrect.

Comment: Re:Nope (Score 1) 229

by fyngyrz (#49165523) Attached to: Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC

Having used both removable batteries and external battery bricks, the external battery brick is FAR more useful.

Probably so. Luckily, there's a much better way to go. Throw out the original battery, replace it with one that has several times the capacity, replace the back with the supplied replacement, and buy the appropriate hardshell if that's how you roll.

Result? More battery life than a brick, no having to plug in all the time, and no need to remove the battery until it dies, which will likely be some years down the road.

When I bought my Note 3 (SM-N900V), it wouldn't last a day. I'd have to turn it off (not use apps, etc.) before bedtime if I wanted it to have enough juice left to receive a call, text, IM or email, etc. -- it would hit 5% by 9pm or so. Once I replaced the battery, I just pop the thing on the charger about every other day while I'm sleeping and have no worries. It'll go three full days of use, but that does put the battery down to about 20%, so I tend to avoid it.

This makes the phone thicker and heavier. I don't mind a bit. But some people would.

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from a rigged demo.

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