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Comment Re:If I had my way... (Score 2) 96

I'd seriously like to see the courts side with consumers and insist Lexmar must refill the cartridge for free as long as I own the printer. Let's see how fast the printer companies back off from their outrageous claims.

All of the printer companies have a history of abusing the legal system. Lexmar just happens to the worse offender.

Comment Why web apps tend to suck in general (Score 1) 198

When there are so many layers between you and "the metal", it's just a matter of time before one of those layers creates a road block. You can get around these road blocks in at least two ways: 1. install native code and get to the metal, or 2. use less efficient techniques to get around the block.

Taking route 1 means you can't claim "cross platform browser app" any more. Taking route 2 leads to slow code. It looks like MS chose route 2 and decided to use a frame-by-frame animation instead of using the obvious "timer and XOR" that's been used since the dark ages. I'm guessing that timers and/or XOR aren't available in whatever API was exposed by the browser environment.

After that, it becomes less clear why it's so slow. Even though rendering a cursor frame-by-frame is still less efficient, it shouldn't be *that* inefficient. As others have pointed out, you have a dirty rectangle and an update 60 times per second. Maybe the underlying API is re-rendering the entire screen.

And that's how you get to 13% CPU to blink a cursor, and a lot of other things. That's why web apps keep sucking. It's a problem that can, in theory, be solved; but it won't be solved because it's a lot of work across many different organizations, each with different objectives all trying to hit a moving target of changing architectures and standards.

Comment Re:Wonder why (Score 1) 191

In the cities talked about in the article, i.e. Austin and San Antonio, one is not spending $4,000 a month for a shoebox apartment. That much money would rent a very nice apartment, or buy a modest house in a desirable part of the city.

But many people are looking for a house that is about a maybe two or three square foot for every dollar of their monthly mortgage. That can be hard to find in the city. While one can find a very desirable house at very reasonable costs in the city, it is often in locations where there are diverse people.

The other item is similar to when people moved into the city. More young adults are used to living in the suburbs, and while may move to the city when they are young, are inevitably going to move back to their childhood norm, which increasingly is the exurbs.

Comment Re:Two glasses of wine per day would wreck me (Score 1) 117

This is why most of these studies say it's OK to have the two drinks; but they also say you shouldn't start drinking if you aren't already.

I think we are just at the brink of finally getting past statistical medicine and in to something much better. Statistical medicine is like Newtonian physics. It serves you well up to a point. To really do advanced things, we need to get beyond it and get to an understanding based on each individual's genetic makeup and environment.

It's only recently that they acknowledged the basics, such as Ambien effecting women differently than men!

Anyway, the mechanisms going on in your body might be such that you can't drink. You might be part of a large, but distinct minority. In a world that's moved beyond statistical medicine, the studies will say things like "Men over 40 with Gen profile signatures X2, N353, and G872 should not drink. Women over 50 with the same signatures should have one per day".

Comment Re:Exactly (Score 4, Informative) 191

Did you know that your children are more likely to die violently in a rural area than in the city? And people in rural areas are also more likely to die from heart disease and cancer, among other diseases and injuries.

A suburb is a cross between an urban and a rural area, so it isn't clear at all that a suburb is a "much healthier environment" than a city.

Comment Re:Stupid (Score 1) 234

Yellow means "Stop if safe to do so" in many places.

In most of the USA, yellow means "the light is about to change to red." But you're right, in a few places it means "stop if safe to do so" which is much more ambiguous, meaning it can be (mis-)interpreted by the wrong jurisdiction to mean things like "stop if you are black".

Here's a bit of trivia: in the USA, drivers have a red phase and a yellow phase, while pedestrians have two red phases (don't cross flashing and don't cross solid). And in Los Angeles, it's illegal to cross while elderly because you can't be in the intersection when it changes from flashing to solid, unlike cars which are allowed to be in the intersection when the light changes from red to yellow. It's madness.

Comment Where is the countersuit? (Score 1) 351

I would expect that RottenTomatoes has also *increased* the viewing of many movies as well. I know that I have often gone there and looked at the highest rated movies when looking for something to add to my Netflix DVD queue. I like looking at the critics vs reviewers rating as well. Many a good movie (to me) has been panned by critics. Likewise, many critically acclaimed movies don't always get good reviews.

It's just information though, the choice of what to watch is still mine.

And I knew Batman vs Superman was poorly rated.... and I still added it to my queue. I didn't make it through it though, shut it off after about 1/4 of the way in. Just terrible.

Comment No. p53 - the guardian of the genome. (Score 1) 122

All mammalian cells are constantly producing p53, and disposing of it. When they stop, repair or suicide should occur.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TP53

Once activated, p53 will induce a cell cycle arrest to allow either repair and survival of the cell or apoptosis to discard the damaged cell. How p53 makes this choice is currently unknown... First, the half-life of the p53 protein is increased drastically, leading to a quick accumulation of p53 in stressed cells. Second, a conformational change forces p53 to be activated as a transcription regulator in these cells....

Comment Quercetin (Score 1) 122

About a year ago it was discovered that the common dietary substance quercetin is able to kill senescent endothelial cells in the gi tract.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acel.12344/abstract

By transcript analysis, we discovered increased expression of pro-survival networks in senescent cells, consistent with their established resistance to apoptosis. Using siRNA to silence expression of key nodes of this network, including ephrins (EFNB1 or 3), PI3K, p21, BCL-xL, or plasminogen-activated inhibitor-2, killed senescent cells, but not proliferating or quiescent, differentiated cells. Drugs targeting these same factors selectively killed senescent cells. Dasatinib eliminated senescent human fat cell progenitors, while quercetin was more effective against senescent human endothelial cells and mouse BM-MSCs. The combination of dasatinib and quercetin was effective in eliminating senescent MEFs. In vivo, this combination reduced senescent cell burden in chronologically aged, radiation-exposed, and progeroid Ercc1/ mice. In old mice, cardiac function and carotid vascular reactivity were improved 5 days after a single dose.

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

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