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Comment Re:No Von Neuman Machines yet (Score 1) 192

Raising babies takes a tremendous amount of infrastructure. An adult human is mostly self-sufficient; babies are not. As somebody said, it really does "take a village" to raise a child.

Reality check: Children have grown up all over the planet for all of history with no infrastructure with poorer parents often raising half a dozen of them. The way we raise western 21st century kids means most parents have enough with a few, but unless they quite literally die they grow up every other way too. The "takes a village" saying is about society's influence, everybody wants to fit in with their peers and prevailing norms, even if that is at odds with your parents.

Comment Re:What are we forgetting... (Score 1) 192

Okay, so we've got the mining robots, the auto-fuelling spaceship dock, the autonomous telephone sanitizers... I can't help feeling there's something we're forgetting... Oh! Right - people. Hang on. Why are we sending people again?

Because we're not smart enough to make a robot that could and would do what we'd do and telepresence would be hopeless with the delay. Take the stupidest person you know that can drive a car. Ask him to write the software for a self-driving car, might as well ask him to jump to the Moon. Not even many man-years of the best and brightest has managed to get their car a driver's license that millions of teenagers manage every year. If there's a real base there will be plenty that goes wrong or becomes defective and plenty to fix. If it's just to have humans in a bunker eating canned food until their return flight, then yeah there's not much point.

Comment Re:And what about Wi-Fi (Score 1) 229

If the IT is part of your gameplay, it becomes part of the game. Just like the headphones and the marketing.

Or would you say that a bank does not need to do IT well, because they are a bank and not an IT company? Or a provider does not have to do accounting well, because they are not an accounting company?

So if you get non-working hardware then you have not tested it enough. Probably because a lot of money has been paid to do it that way, instead of looking what was really needed.

What they should have said is "We do not have the knowledge, so we do not want these devices until we have the knowledge." Instead they said "Give us a few million and we use an Etch-A-Scetch" or a wet newspaper for all we care. (Insert joke how that would have been better)

Comment Re:Set up correct secondary DNS servers (Score 1) 299

So my IoT thing sends out a http request on port 80 of your web server, is that a DDOS attack or is that a valid request?
There used to be a website where so many people went to a posted URL that the server could not follow the requests. This was called slashdotting.
These were all legitimate requests. With a DDOS the requests are not legimate in a sense that the owner of the device did not want to do the request. So I have some questions:
How do you know the difference between a legimate and non-legimate HTTP request?
How will DNS solve in any way?

Comment Re:Something you have, something you know (Score 1) 411

Hello, please give us you passcode AND your thumb, or you will be detained for a period of time during working hours. That means you will not be able to get to work and you will likely be without a job very soon.
To help that along, we will call your employer to say that you have been detained concerning a childporn investigation. Do not say anything to anybody, because then we will be angry and I or anybody in the department if I get thrown in jail, will go after you and destroy your life.
You have 5 seconds to comply.

Comment Re:Seems like violating the 4th amendment, not the (Score 1) 411

I keep hearing about these amendements. Can anybody explain what they are? Are they some part of Klingon culture, because it sure isn' something that is valid in the real world.

At this moment I see them as nice discussion points, but nothing more. As long as you can not uphold a law, it isn't worth the paper it was written on.

The situation now is that if people with enough power are cought, they say "So what?" as nothing will be done.

Comment Re:Should we be using TrueCrypt 7.1a instead? (Score 4, Informative) 71

I would like this answer too, please, someone...

If you have system encryption enabled (traditional BIOS, no UEFI support) and you have a strong passphrase and you are the only user and you're not worried that anyone can physically tamper with your system boot or rescue disc - in which case they might just as well use a key logger - then there's no critical issues.

There are several nice to haves that make weak passwords stronger by increasing iterations, close various attacks that other users/processes can do and cleaning up better if you only use containers. The ugliest is probably a privilege escalation attack, malicious software can use the TrueCrypt driver to escalate to admin but if malware is running on your machine you probably have big problems anyway.

Probably the most interesting part about VeraCrypt is the potential for UEFI boot but apparently there's no way to secure erase the keyboard buffer, all you can do is reset it (which they didn't do, but do now) and hope the driver actually overwrites it. But if you can dump the entire UEFI memory area it might still be there. Hopefully legacy BIOS mode will be around for a while longer, in this case simpler is safer.

Comment Re:how about 4A (Score 1) 411

They couldn't force you with out the lead pipes and rubber hoses, fortunately those aren't allowed in the US yet. What you do in a situation like this is refuse to comply, force them to arrest you and spend the night in jail so you can call the ACLU and get the warrant tossed. See they get away with it because no one refused to comply. Once everyone in the building complies there is no effective way to sue them and set a precedent that will stop this happening again.

Why not? If you think they have an illegal warrant, you sue them as if they had no warrant. Same way you don't sue GPL violators for copyright infringement and not breach of contract, because you have no proof they agreed to the license. They will bring out the warrant and say it's okay, we had a warrant. Then you can challenge it and appeal any dismissals. I wouldn't do it without the ACLU, EFF or someone like that bankrolling it, but it seems to carry less risk since if your challenge fails you were never "rightfully" arrested and perhaps even charged with obstruction of justice. I strongly doubt "Scary guys with guns and fancy papers said I had to or be arrested so I did" counts as consent, immediate compliance does not mean you lose your right to challenge it after reviewing with legal counsel. Same way I'm not about to argue with a SWAT team breaking down the wrong door, I'd comply perfectly. Then sue the shit out of them.

Comment Re:After watching (Score 2) 349

I don't think there's any way to stop gerrymandering other than the voters themselves waking up. California tried appointing a panel of retired judges to draw the boundaries, but it turns out judge panels can be rigged, too. Pretty much any system you can think of can be gamed.

Well the primary reason for gerrymandering is to cause "lost" votes. Here in Norway we have 169 members of parliament, 150 of them are traditional district-specific votes. Since we got 19 districts, there is 150/19 = ~7.9 seats/district though they're actually distributed by population. This means you need like 100/7.9 = ~12.7% of the votes to get a direct seat or even higher in the smaller districts, which is a high bar to pass. But all the spillover votes of parties that got at least 4% nationally - no limit on direct seats - and didn't lead to a direct seat are put in a pool and used to assign the last 19 seats. So the more lucky you got securing direct seats, the less likely you'll get any bonus seats. I'd say it's been quite effective at producing a strong local representation, while making sure it's close to proportional on the national level.

Comment Re:how about 4A (Score 2) 411

supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

You are reading way too much into this. If the police get a warrant to search a particular house for drugs that is a specific warrant. If it were all houses or to search for any contraband that would be a general warrant and unconstitutional. When they exercise that warrant they're going to search the whole house with everyone's belongings, they don't have to go through the coat rack and assign ownership first then come back with one warrant for Alice's jacket, one for Bob's jacket and not search Eve's jacket because she was just visiting. If they tried to search a whole apartment building because of one occupant that would probably be overreaching, but they don't have to be extremely particular either. And they may search anywhere drugs may be hidden, the only limitation is things obviously out of scope like opening letters, playing movies and other actions that can't possibly lead to the discovery of drugs. But if the evidence could be on the phone, the phone is free game.

I think the same goes with crowds, if it's two room mates they'll search it all even though eventually it might turn out only one sold drugs and the other was innocent. But searching a thousand people at a concert even though you have compelling evidence someone is selling drugs is probably not reasonable, though I can't find any precedent on how strong individual suspicion is necessary. If you're say raiding an illegal gambling club it might be reasonable to suspect all of illegal gambling no matter the size. Now this search may led to finding evidence of other crimes like illegal guns and anything they find specified in the warrant or not may give probable cause for arrest, but that is fine because they're not part of the premise for the warrant. The only time you need to name a person is when issuing an arrest warrant because you intend to seize that person, since you can't have a general warrant to arrest people. That said, we have some gray areas surrounding terror organizations where mere membership is criminalized that is bordering on general arrest.

Comment Re:For all the night shift Tesla owners (Score 2) 81

Localization of the power source doesn't matter. Everything is interconnected by the grid anyway

I'll stop you right there, the moment you say that it means some people might want solar panels and some want a Tesla, but there's no synergy whatsoever. That there's no particular benefit to owing both a solar panel and a Tesla that doesn't exist independently. If that is the case, they don't really have anything to do with each other any more than Tesla and SpaceX. Either or none or both might be a success, but they don't depend on each other at all. It doesn't matter who owns them, they'll succeed or fail on their own merits anyway.

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An egghead is one who stands firmly on both feet, in mid-air, on both sides of an issue. -- Homer Ferguson