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Comment Re:Or just go back to the way things were before (Score 1) 5

This is personal to me. A friend I knew in high school, went into the service with, and kept in touch with couldn't afford insurance and caught appendicitis. It ruined his credit and nearly his family. In 1992 when he had a heart attack, he just laid down and died rather than calling 911.

That's what happens in the US when you work full time and can't afford insurance.

Comment Hipchat does this with every file transferred (Score 5, Interesting) 29

Using the Atlassian chat client, HipChat, if a user transmits a file to another user, the file is stored on Amazon S3, just like it sounds as Box is doing, and is accessible by an obfuscated URL. The files are then available via any unauthenticated GET requests that can stumble upon the URL string via brute force.

A clever attacker doesn't even need to use her own resources in the brute force attack. A website can be constructed with millions of links pointing at candidate URLs and eventually Google and other indexers will spider them and the ones that don't turn up 404 errors will be added to the web index.

Comment Re:protecting capabilities (Score 1) 404



It's interesting that you do not deny that Putin's interest in relieving the economic sanctions trumps (pun intended) his interest in crushing Isis. Ok. We are in agreement there.

You seem like a bright fellow, so you'll probably recognize the fallacy you've presented in your own post regarding Podesta's lobbying firm taking money from a Russian bank. Did that money actually win them influence over Hillary Clinton? Apparently not. According to your prolific tirades against Clinton on Slashdot, she's a war mongering hawk trying to start wars with Russia. Donald Trump, in contrast, has the potential to (using your words)--

...join hands with Russia and Turkey to crush Isis.

You are trying to paint Clinton and Podesta as puppets of Russian lobbying money, while claiming the DNC also promotes Putin as a boogeyman. Kind of emphasizes the lack of real influence this money had on Clinton. You repeatedly reference this Saudi oil money going to the Clinton Foundation and paying for Chelsea's wedding, but where are the details on the quid pro quo? What was gained for them or the Russian bank?

I think we're getting tired of your broken record of "yeah, but Clinton collected money from xyz." Why don't you build up a stronger case for why Trump should hold hands with Putin to destroy Isis? We would all like to see your references to the great and wonderful things Vladimir Putin has done that would help explain how his involvement in Syria is only out of a humanitarian interest. I am very curious to hear more about your rationale for Donald Trump developing closer relations with Vladimir Putin.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Sixteen: The Final Chapter 2

It's that time of year again. The time of year when everyone and their dog waxes nostalgic about all the shit nobody cares about from the year past, and stupidly predicts the next year in the grim knowledge that when the next New Year comes along nobody will remember
that the dumbass predicted a bunch of foolish shit that turned out to be complete and utter balderdash. I might as well, too. Just like I did last year (yes, a lot of this was pasted from last year's final chapter).

Comment Re:protecting capabilities (Score 1) 404

..instead of having the US join hands with Russia and Turkey to crush Isis.

The Russian interest at play here is not to crush Isis, but to crush the economic sanctions against Russia for invading Crimea and trying to take over Ukraine. These sanctions are crippling the ability of the Russian Oligarchy to enjoy their wealth and amass more.

Do you think Paul Manafort was advising Trump on how Russia could join hands to help the US destroy ISIS, or do you think he was telling Trump about how all the Russian oligarchs would love him if he were to remove these annoying sanctions?

Trump has a track record of championing making money over punishing wrong-doers. Consider this episode where he wanted a convicted rapist to avoid prison time so his casino could profit off of his boxing match--

Trump and Tyson are old friends who did business together in the late 1980s, when the real estate mogul promoted and hosted several of Tyson's fights at his Atlantic City casinos and even fashioned himself for a time as the boxer's "business adviser." And in a largely forgotten episode, Trump came to the boxer's aid during one the darkest moments of Tyson's careerâ"his 1992 conviction for raping a beauty queen. To save the champ from being locked up, Trump pitched a highly controversial proposal that would have essentially allowed Tyson to buy his way out of prison.

Comment protecting capabilities (Score 1) 404

Your premise in denouncing the report is that the methodology employed is not as sophisticated as you expect Russia to be capable of. You should consider and acknowledge a couple of espionage realities:

The spearphishing employed against Podesta worked and was trackable. The report is not going to talk about the hacking attempts that did not work and were not trackable. As in the case of the Tempest vans you reference. Because the report does not mention Tempest vans does not mean they are not driving around.

Intelligence agencies will only release info that does not compromise their capabilities of collecting intelligence. If they were to release a transcript of a private office conversation between Putin and Paul Manafort containing details of the hacking, then Putin would realize there is a bug in his office and clear it out. The confidence of these US intelligence agencies that Russia was meddling in the recent election is buttressed by information collected that can't be released without divulging the source mechanism for its collection. What you see in the report is safe information to release.

Comment No. It didn't "predict" anything. (Score 0, Troll) 186

It reacted when there were "obvious" signs of trouble, and it didn't "predict" anything. The 2nd car in front was slowing fast enough that the Tesla would have started to brake on its own -- just as happened here. Would a person have noticed and reacted in the same way? Maybe; probably not. What I'm saying here isn't dismissing what the Tesla did...but the Tesla also didn't "predict" anything or see into the future; it reacted to inputs that were already present, and a good and attentive human driver might have done the same thing. Once perfected, self-driving cars and accident avoidance technology will make the roads safer â" but let's not make them seem magical, because they aren't.

Comment There is, and will be, no "Muslim registry" (Score 1, Informative) 600

They are protesting something that will never be created, because when the rhetoric was translated into reality, it was a proposal to reestablish the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS)[1], which was in force through half of President Obama's presidency, and which tracks certain individuals who enter the United States based on country/region of origin and other factors. Useless publicity stunt with commensurate absolutely abysmal coverage by The Intercept.

See also:

8 U.S. Code  1182 - Inadmissible aliens[2]

"Suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by President:

Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate."

Flashback:

"The Secretary of State and the Attorney General will invalidate all visas issued to Iranian citizens for future entry into the United States, effective today. We will not reissue visas, nor will we issue new visas, except for compelling and proven humanitarian reasons or where the national interest of our own country requires. This directive will be interpreted very strictly."[3] -- President Jimmy Carter, April 7, 1980

[1] https://www.ice.gov/nseers
[2] https://www.law.cornell.edu/us...
[3] http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu...

Comment Re:Garages? (Score 1) 11

Think about the power to weight ratio--with as little as a plastic vehicle with a passenger or two would weigh on Ceres, the ratio would be very high, especially after they found the ferromagnetics in the belt that could be magnetized a hundred times as strong as today's (that story, "The Pirate", is still in edit), replace the magnets in a 100 watt motor with them, and one watt will run that motor as well as 100 did the old.

They already had real moon buggies, they're still up there. They used wheels, but the moon is a LOT heavier than Ceres.

Imagine playing basketball on Ceres? I might add that to a story, there were microgravity sports in "Mars, Ho!".

Comment Re:Hard drive or software? (Score 1) 106

I don't back up daily, more like weekly, plus whenever I have a rash of new data. I keep the backup drive unplugged except when backing up, and never in s thunderstorm. Losing my non-backed up data would only hurt a little, it isn't like I'll lose a 10,000 customer database or anything.

Before I retired, backups were automatically done daily by software. I had to change the backup tapes weekly.

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