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Submission + - Lucasfilm, Disney use DMCA to take down picture of legally purchased toy figure (torrentfreak.com)

think_nix writes: Torrentfreak reports in the awaking of the new star wars film, how Lucasfilm and Disney are gearing up for DMCA take down notices regarding the new film. However, reports have come in when Star Wars Action News posted an update to facebook with a picture of a legally purchased Star Wars Rey action figure, which was taken down through the DMCA. Further abusive take downs have occured, which in turn have caused some fan sites to go down. starwarsunity.net explained through their twitter account, which had to be taken down simply for reposting the picture from Star Wars Action News.

Submission + - "Clock boy" threatens to sue city and school if they don't pay him $15 million. 2

phrackthat writes: The family of Ahmed Mohamed, the boy who was arrested in Irving, Texas, when a clock he had went off in school, has threatened to sue the school and the city of Irving, Texas if they do not pay him $15 million as compensation for the supposed indignities he endured when he was arrested.

To refresh the memories of everyone, Ahmed's clock was a clock he disassembled then put into a pencil case that looked like a miniature briefcase. He was briefly detained by the Irving city police to interview him and determine if he intended for his clock to be perceived as a fake bomb. He was released to his parents later on that day and they publicized the matter and claimed Ahmed was arrested because of "Islamophobia".

Submission + - NASA contracting development of new ion/nuclear engines

schwit1 writes: NASA has awarded three different companies contracts to develop advanced ion and nuclear propulsion systems for future interplanetary missions, both manned and unmanned.

These are development contacts, all below $10 million. However, they all appeared structured like NASA’s cargo and crew contracts for ISS, where the contractor does all of the development and design, with NASA only supplying some support and periodic payments when the contractor achieves agreed-upon milestones. Because of this, the contractors will own the engines their develop, and will be able to sell them to other customers after development, thereby increasing the competition and innovation in the field.

Submission + - What the Sony Hack Looked Like to Employees (slate.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The cyber attack on Sony was one of the highest profile hacks in the past several years. Slate tracked down two dozen people who worked there at the time, and asked them what it was like on the inside while it was happening. Quoting: "The telephone directory vanished. Voicemail was offline. Computers became bricks. Internet access on the lot was shuttered. The cafeteria went cash-only. Contracts—and the templates those contracts were based on—disappeared. Sony’s online database of stock footage was unsearchable. It was near impossible for Sony to communicate directly with its employees—much less ex-employees, who were also gravely affected by the hack—to inform them of what was even happening and what to do about it. 'It was like moving back into an earlier time,' one employee says." Some employees had their workloads doubled, some had nothing to do. While the hack brought the company together at the beginning, it eventually descended into recriminations and lawsuits.

Submission + - VirtuallyGhetto VMware blogger detained and deported in Paris (twitter.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: William Lam the VMware blogger behind virtuallyGhetto is now being sent back to the US after being detained, jailed for 24 hours and stripped of all belongings. According to William Lam's twitter page,

"*sigh* Apparently Interpol has an interest in virtuallyGhetto, not the good kind :( There's chance I might not make #VMworld"


Submission + - EU Ministers backing GMO Food. Allowing Nation States Approve or Deny.

think_nix writes: As reported from EU Parliament with a controversial follow up at rt . The EU Parliament is paving way for EU Nation States to decide on banning or allowing GMO grown foods within their respective territories. A further article at der Spiegel (German) (google translate) quotes the German Health Minister if countries cannot specifically scientifically argument the ban, this would allow GMO companies to initiate legal actions against the banning ruling states. Furthermore it was noted, given EU Parliaments current stance on not reintroducing border and customs controls between member states, this will make checks and controls of GMO foods between member states even more difficult. Also noting that the recently passed EU consumer food label law has no mention of GMO foods.

Submission + - EU Ministers backing GMO Food. Allowing Nation States Approve or Deny.

think_nix writes: As reported from EU Parliament with a controversial follow up at rt . The EU Parliament is paving way for EU Nation States to decide on banning or allowing GMO grown foods within their respective territories. A further article at der Spiegel (German) (google translate) quotes the German Health Minister if countries cannot specifically scientifically argument the ban, this would allow GMO companies to initiate legal actions against the banning ruling states. Furthermore it was noted, given EU Parliaments current stance on not reintroducing border and customs controls between member states, this will make checks and controls of GMO foods between member states even more difficult. Also noting that the recently passed EU consumer food label law has no mention of GMO foods.

Submission + - NASA physicist, artist unveil an enterprising warp-speed craft design

mrspoonsi writes: Thanks to a NASA physicist, the notion of warp speed might just travel out of sci-fi and into the real world.
NASA's Harold White has been working since 2010 to develop a warp drive that will allow spacecraft to travel at speeds faster than light — 186,000 miles per second. White, who heads NASA's Advanced Propulsion Team, spoke about his conceptual starship at a conference last fall. But interest in his project reached a new level this week when he unveiled images of what the craft might look like. Created by artist Mark Rademaker, who based them on White's designs, the images show a technologically detailed spacecraft that wouldn't look out of place in a "Star Trek" movie. Rademaker says creating them took more than 1,600 hours. In his speech, White described space warps as faraway galaxies that can bend light around them. "There's no speed limit on the expansion and contraction of space, You can actually find a way to get around what I like to call the 11th commandment: Thou shall not exceed the speed of light."

Submission + - Are the Glory Days of Analog Engineering Over? (eetimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Controversy has been swirling for years over the question of whether analog engineers are relevant in a digital world. Analog engineers themselves are lining up against management in the tussle over whether there really is a shrinking pool of engineers to do the work, or whether companies have unrealistic expectations. As one former analog engineer puts it, "The job descriptions for analog engineers today ask for expertise in all these analog areas, then they throw in 'must know VHDL' [a digital programming language]. Your head would explode if you had to carry all the information in your head!

Submission + - After the Sun (Microsystems) Sets, the Real Stories Come Out (ieee.org)

Tekla Perry writes: Former Sun executives and employees gathered in Mountain View, Calif., in May, and out came the "real" stories. Andy Bechtolsheim reports that Steve Jobs wasn't the only one who set out to copy the Xerox Parc Alto; John Gage wonders why so many smart engineers couldn't figure out that it would have been better to buy tables instead of kneepads for the folks doing computer assembly; Vinod Khosla recalls the plan to "rip-off Sun technology;" and more.

Submission + - How have Slashdotters dealt with divorce digitally?

An anonymous reader writes: I am a long time Slashdotter and currently find myself in the beginning of a divorce process. How have slashdotters dealt with dispersing of shared data, accounts and things online in such a situation? Domains, hosting, email, sensitive data backups and social media are just a few examples.

Submission + - Many Websites "Leaking" Personal Info To Other Fir (computerworld.com)

JohnBert writes: "Many top websites share their visitors' names, usernames or other personal information with their partners without telling users and, in some cases, without knowing they're doing it, according to a new study from Stanford University.

Many websites "leak" usernames to third-party advertising networks by including usernames in URLs that the ad networks can see in referrer headers, said the study, released Tuesday by Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. While there's a debate in legal circles whether usernames are personal information, there's a growing consensus among computer scientists that Web-based companies can use usernames to identify their owners, said Jonathan Mayer, a Stanford graduate student who led the study.

Other websites share first names, email addresses and other information with advertising or other partners, Mayer said at a privacy conference in Washington. Those identifiers "get associated not just with what you're doing right now, but get associated with what you've done in the past, and what Web browsing activity you may have in the future," he said."

Censorship

Submission + - Splunk: Worst EULA ever (hacker.dk)

An anonymous reader writes: Splunk, the loganalyzer tool praised by many in the unix world, seems to have a pretty bad EULA.
Since no one every reads the EULA, they can just stick anything in there and have you sign away basic rights. (like the right to your soul.)
The EULA prohibits publication of benchmarks or even "your evaluation of the software". You must let "auditors" (or as the article says, "Gestapo") into your company and (without them paying for your time) humor them as they go through anything they need.

All that and more can be found in the Splunk EULA, or highlights here: http://blog.hacker.dk/2010/08/splunk-license-review-at-what-price-do-you-run-this-syslog-analyzer/

Security

Submission + - Can photos of networks impact security? 2

CapitalistShark writes: "I work for a news agency in Canada and when one of our reporters was doing a story on a new government data centre under construction, he was told he couldn't take any photos of a rack of servers because it could compromise network security. Is this actually possible? Have any Slashdot readers out there heard of cases of network security being compromised because of photographs taken of physical hardware?"

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