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Comment Re:December 30th (Score 1) 200

It was also the "done thing" to lurk for a while before posting. Well, that was the case before Eternal September, anyway...

This. If I would have made an account when I started using /., I'd have a 3 or low 4 digit uid, and given that both of us made accounts around the same time, I'd wager you would as well. There's something to be said for actually learning about a community before you join it.

Comment Do it right. (Score 1) 271

To echo what I've seen quickly, RAID is not backups. If something (like cryptolocker) suddenly encrypts all your files... you're still completely utterly FUCKED.
If your domicile burns to the group, you're fucked. You need something that'll keep your data consistent, and keep it safe from theft/fire/destruction.

I'm going to ignore any cost considerations... whatever.

Build two identical boxes. The first box is going to sit in your place of residence, the second is going to sit elsewhere (like your parents house, or a buddies)
Each box is running your OS dejour that naively supports ZFS, a pair of 4TB drives, setup as a ZFS mirror volume. Use whatever software you use to copy data to the local box, rsync, crashplan, whatever, once that task is completed, you'll drop a snapshot of all the pertinent file systems you care about. You now, remotely drop a snapshot on our offsite box and then kick off an rsync that catch any changes.

1. If something has drastically gone wrong with your data locally, you can always revert (in this case promote) your latest snapshot (or whatever snapshot you like best). Plus you can thumb through all your snapshots and see what you like...

2. Even if something hasn't gone wrong, but you liked an old version of something, you have that too... though you'll have to decide on a strategy for how many snapshots you're willing to keep. zfs snapshots are now scm but sometimes you realize you don't have something under control and then you wish you did.

3. You've got a full duplicate of this elsewhere in case fire/flood/theft/etc.

4. Monthly do scrubs of your file system just to make sure everything is healthy. Want to expand your volume? Add two more disks and you can tack on another mirror. Yeah, it won't be balanced but you'll suddenly have more space.

Comment Re:The MS Merry Go Round. (Score 1) 211

You're completely wrong here.

If you were talking about a normal, competitive industry like cars, you'd be correct: reliability costs money, and unreliability costs customers. Detroit knows that lesson all too well. Sell someone an unreliable car, and they'll badmouth it and start looking for another car in the same price range with a better reliability reputation. This is why Japanese brands have commanded higher prices than similar American cars for a long time; it takes a lot of time (esp. in the car industry since people keep their cars for years) to fix your reputation. It's even more pronounced in other markets where the products cost less and people don't keep them as long (cars are the second-most expensive items consumers typically purchase, behind houses).

Microsoft does not operate in a competitive industry. If someone thinks Windows 10 is unreliable, what are they going to do? They could buy a Mac, but those are much more expensive than Windows machines; you're not going to get a Mac for $300 or $400. And the Mac won't so easily run their Windows software, unless they run it in a VM (like with Parallels) but then they're still going to have the same unreliability problems since that's really Windows. They could run Linux, but there again you have the software compatibility problem, and on top of that most people don't even know what Linux is. In the enterprise space, it's really worse because even though they have professional IT, those IT pros only know Windows (you'll have to lay off your whole IT department and start from scratch to switch OSes), and they run all kinds of crappy "enterprise" software that only runs on Windows.

So, since the customers aren't going anywhere (except holding out with their older Windows versions as long as possible), what incentive exactly does MS have to invest in reliability? None. It's really a waste of money for them, and hurts their profits. It's better for them to make Windows as shoddy as possible to save money (while not making it completely non-functional because then they can suffer class-action lawsuits, returns, etc.), and keep profitability high while letting the customers suffer with unreliability.

So, since the

Comment Re:We love you, mr. Torvalds (Score 1) 223

Um yeah a competitor won't use it? bahaha. They rip off Linux code all the time which is why the point of lawyers are brought up.

Actually, given the vast usage of Linux worldwide, it's astonishing how rare such abuses are.

Shoot some companies like banks have ANTI GNU policies to protect themselves.

Some companies are still clueless enough to do that, yes.

Linux can not be used as a simple link to GPL infects the whole program making it viral.

Poppycock. Programs running on Linux do not link to Linux. It's well-accepted that the GPL does not affect programs that merely make syscalls.

I am not a troll here.

Interesting that you feel the need to make that statement.

GNU geeks do not know the difference between GPL and LGPL and assume anyone can use their API. It is not true and it pisses me off.

Also nonsense. Most F/LOSS software developers understand perfectly the distinction between GPL and LGPL, and choose appropriately based on whether they want to allow their code to be linked to non-GPL code. Personally, I've used both licenses for libraries I wrote. Though for programs I tend to choose GPL and for libraries I tend to choose Apache2 or BSD. I think the use case for LGPL is pretty narrow.

Investors agree and so the lawyers that [BSD] is the best option

Only if your lawyers haven't bothered to think about patents. The BSD license has a severe flaw in that it doesn't include a patent grant. If you're incorporating someone else's code into your product and you aren't absolutely certain they don't hold any patents on it, you may be setting yourself up for a patent lawsuit. Apache2 is often a better choice for that reason.

Comment Re:BSDL vs GPL (Score 1) 223

I don't see how the GPL forces you to push your contributions upstream.

"Forces" is too strong, but there's a powerful incentive to upstream changes. Not upstreaming them means that you end up maintaining a library of patches that you have to port to each new version that's released. Over time this gets to be really difficult and expensive.

Note that this is also true for BSD code... except that in the BSD world there are some legal counter-incentives that discourage you from upstreaming. Too many people will argue that because the license allows you to keep your code to yourself, you should, which leads you into a patch-maintenance hell that the business and legal types don't appreciate or understand. So, the GPL helps the technical staff by eliminating the secrecy argument and encouraging upstreaming, which eliminates patch-maintenance hell.

Also, the upstream argument is something that's been compellingly disproven in the case of BSD.

No, it hasn't. You're right that smart BSD projects do upstream changes to avoid patch maintenance hell, but it takes a particularly enlightened organization to do it. The GPL helps be eliminating the option of keeping your changes secret. In a very few cases, this is a problem because the code in question has crucial competitive value *and* can't be run effectively in userspace. But those cases are rare, and the tendency is for organizations to vastly overestimate the value of their proprietary code.

Comment Re:Extraordinary claims require ... (Score 1) 200

Indeed. But Occam's Razor only applies to a conclusion's relation to the information you have at hand. It is conceivable that if you collect enough information the same heuristic can lead you in a different direction.

It should be able to confirm his genetic relationship to his putative great-great-great grandchildren, and thus let a lower limit on his age. That and other documentary evidence of him and his descendants could make his age seem plausible. In a world with seven billion people, outliers can be very unusual indeed.

Comment It's hard to believe. (Score 5, Interesting) 105

The amount of data you need assemble a global navigation system is enormous. You don't hire some intern to transcribe data out of Wikipedia, you license it from companies like Tele Atlas.

Now for geographic place names you'd turn to sources like the USGS GNIS system for the US, whatever the local equivalent of GNIS is, or for places that don't have that datasets like GNIS the DoD's Defense Mapping Agency.

It can't possibly be that Bing gets their place/position data mainly from Wikipedia. The only thing I can think is that they did some kind of union of all the geographic name sources they could find in order to maximize the chance of getting a hit on a place name search, and somehow screwed up prioritizing the most reliable sources first.

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