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Comment Re:We all saw this coming (Score 1) 33

Five minutes? I worked there for more than five years and I am still amazed at the ineptitude and laziness I encountered there. Some individuals took their jobs seriously, but the whole work environment was all about who's dick you were sucking and trying to be groomed for promotion into a job where you did nothing and got paid a lot.

Oh, we need to do stuff about security like protecting passwords or credit card data? Meh, spend five minutes on it until the next customer complains then move on. If you don't have enough time to fix a problem, we'll just dump it in the customer's lap and tell them to take a hike because we already completed the contract and cashed their check per SOX requirements.

This breach and its ramifications do not surprise me one bit. I would be extremely surprised if this was the first breach, and we just did not know about previous ones. That happens when you fire half of MIS, slash their budget, and burden them with arbitrary, nonsensical constraints that prevent them from doing their jobs.

Submission + - Microsoft will use Windows 10 UWP to kill game vending competitors like Steam (pcgamer.com) 2

slashdot_commentator writes: In an interview with Edge Magazine, Tim Sweeney is claiming that future updates to Windows 10 could serve to erode the usefulness of third-party applications and storefronts like Steam.

Sweeney states, "The risk here is that, if Microsoft convinces everybody to use UWP, then they phase out Win32 apps. If they can succeed in doing that then it’s a small leap to forcing all apps and games to be distributed through the Windows Store. Once we reach that point, the PC has become a closed platform. It won’t be that one day they flip a switch that will break your Steam library – what they’re trying to do is a series of sneaky manoeuvres. They make it more and more inconvenient to use the old apps, and, simultaneously, they try to become the only source for the new ones."

"Slowly, over the next five years, they will force-patch Windows 10 to make Steam progressively worse and more broken. They’ll never completely break it, but will continue to break it until, in five years, people are so fed up that Steam is buggy that the Windows Store seems like an ideal alternative. That’s exactly what they did to their previous competitors in other areas. Now they’re doing it to Steam. It’s only just starting to become visible. Microsoft might not be competent enough to succeed with their plan, but they’re certainly trying."

Submission + - Subscribers Pay 61 Cents/Hour of Cable, But Only 20 Cents/Hour of Netflix (allflicks.net)

An anonymous reader writes: The folks at AllFlicks decided to crunch some numbers to determine just how much more expensive cable is than Netflix. They answered the question: how much does Netflix cost per hour of content viewed, and how does that compare with cable's figures? AllFlicks reports: "We know from Netflix’s own numbers that Netflix’s more than 75 million users stream 125 million hours of content every day. So that’s (roughly) 100 minutes per user, per day. Using the price of Netflix’s most popular plan ($9.99) and a 30-day month, we can say that the average user is paying about 0.33 cents per minute of content, or 20 cents an hour. Not bad! But what about cable? Well, Nielsen tells us that the average American adult cable subscriber watches 2,260 minutes of TV per week (including timeshifted TV). That’s equivalent to 5.38 hours per day, or 161.43 hours per 30-day month. Thanks to Leichtman Research, we know that the average American pays $99.10 per month for cable TV. That means that subscribers are paying a whopping 61.4 cents per hour to watch cable TV – more than three times as much as users pay per hour of Netflix!"

Comment Re:MakeMKV (Score 2) 193

MakeMKV is free and not time-limited for DVDs, but costs money and has a time-limited demo available for Blu-rays.

MakeMKV contains both freeware and shareware functionality. You may use MakeMKV to convert or stream DVD and AVCHD discs for free, as much as you want. Converting or streaming Blu-ray discs is shareware functionality. You can use shareware functionality for free during 30-days trial period. If you like MakeMKV and you want to use it after your 30-days trial version expires, you need to purchase a registration key.

source

Comment Re:There is only one goal (Score 1) 555

So if the officer went out without a loaded mag it'd be their fault, but we'll blame the gun manufacturer when the cop fails to charge the fucking battery.

Magazine does not unload by itself, that requires a trigger press or manually removing the cartridges. Unless the LEO is at the firing range or in an active shooting situation that magazine will be loaded today, tomorrow, next year, 50 years from now.

Ever had a phone or other device that could not keep a charge? The battery will discharge on its own over time and statistically, at some point, an LEO somewhere will get shot and the suspect will get away. Then comes the bad press for this unnecessary technology.

Comment Re:I doubt this (Score 1) 164

This must have a lot of false positives.

True, especially for projects where the maintainers care about style and ensure code in pull requests conforms to project guidelines. Note: this is not about formatting, where to put braces, etc. which is information lost during compilation. I am talking about naming (which may be preserved in debugging symbols), code structures, etc. which may be partially or fully preserved.

I'd be surprised if this works at all, but sure it would sell some product and get a few grants.

Me too. Mostly because compiled code is likely optimized, rearranged, and information is lost during compilation anyway. Five people could write the same block of code slightly differently, and a compiler could compile it to the same machine-/byte-/whatever-code. How do you tell which of the five wrote it? Most likely, you do not.

Comment Re:Let the Public Decide (Score 1) 439

What? Stealership service departments are terrible. Warranty work only.

I take my car to a dealership for service sometimes and they will do anything I ask them to, from oil change to major repairs. Prices are competitive, too. For something like tires they will not be as competitive as, say, NTB who has a better selection and heavily pushes rebates and sales, but I have had a good experience for a lot of things.

Comment Re:sTEM (Score 2) 219

"Computer Science" doesn't use the scientific method, it uses proofs. That makes it a branch of mathematics.

The foundations of Computer Science are in mathematics, but there is a lot of science, too, at the PhD level.

The way that most of us use CS it is a lot more mathematical: writing programs that use math and run on a CPU, a machine that rigidly follows rules.

If you look at the doctoral, theoretical level, the scientific method does come into play a lot. Think about applications such as modeling weather, complex networks, or AI. The idea of "make a hypothesis and test it" is quite prevalent in the research in the ACM journals, for example.

Comment Re:What are natural flavors, really? (Score 1) 163

Artificial colors and flavors have little to do with "flavor-ant that has been isolated and extracted (with chemical processes and solvents in most cases) starting with a natural source and the same chemical that has been produced with a chemical process starting with purified raw ingredients". Most are carcinogens or hormonal disruptors.

The dose makes the poison. Water can be toxic if consumed in large quantities. Mercury can be harmless or highly toxic depending on which type of molecule you ingest and in what quantity.

Red #40 is harmless in the quantities used. Hint: that box of Froot Loops has less than a drop in it. But I would not want to drink a pint of the stuff.

Comment Re:Those of you who are? (Score 1) 156

I appreciate software is different than engineering, but the collaboration, mentoring, and comorodory of an open office environment really helps build the business for us. While I do have an office

You like the open office environment, although you have your own office... how nice. Open offices are really nice as long as it is someone else dealing with being packed in like cattle.

Comment Re:Not a Piece of Shit (Score 2) 128

One of the requirements of PCI compliance with the credit card companies is that you don't use default passwords in any equipment tied to the card transaction.

Which makes this even more interesting. Based on the password and the fact that a paperclip is required I know the specific vendor and equipment to which the article refers, despite the authors going to great lengths to omit that information. The vendor is a big one and their equipment is involved in millions of electronic payments made every day. You could even say they are "the way to pay." In fact, they are involved in PCI certification for most production deployments involving their hardware: most, but not all, because certain deployments using default configurations do not need additional certification, just a quick verification that IP addresses and the like are properly configured.

I understand the need for a default password, but it really should be changed. That being said, the encryption keys are not accessible using that password. They are stored in a hardware module that self-destructs if you tamper with it. They can only be set in one of two secure locations both controlled by the vendor: if you attempt to use any other means to mess with the keys, bye-bye memory card that stores them. This is bad, but not as bad as it sounds at first.

Comment Re:call the library ? (Score 3, Informative) 246

If there's a real incident in progress, this wouldn't work. They'd either not answer, or be compelled by the people with guns to tell the cops that everything is a-okay.

I agree, nobody would answer. From the summary, nobody even has to read the article for this one:

...claimed to be holed up in the town's closed public library with two hostages and a bomb.

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