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Comment Re:No one makes anyone buy anything. (Score 1) 178

Do you actually think that at some point prices were based on maintaining a "moral" 10% profit margin?

This is a product of snowflake think.

Sadly, we've raised a sheltered generation of kids that thing the world is fair, everyone is equal, business and all manner of human interaction is moral, and above all else, protect everyones self esteem.

Yes, for some reason, people are now attaching the word 'moral' to fiscal transactions...job salaries, welfare.....etc. Hell, I've had them talking about morality in taxation...really?

Money has never been about morals. It is there to earn the person/company a profit, to pay its employees and owners. Nothing more.

Taxes are there to fund the govt. services to the populace...nothing morality based at all.

But, you are running more and more into "Snowflake Think" of this type.

Hmm...I may have just coined a phrase here....

Comment Re:Unimpressive performance. (Score 2) 113

Scan through a big folder of 20MP+ photos, what happens to your application cache? Quite possibly evicted.

Intel is probably smart enough to use a hybrid MFU technique rather than MRU. They might set aside a portion or percentage for MRU to speed up ongoing operations, but I don't think they're dumb enough to run the whole cache on that basis.

Comment Re:Er - I'm awake and notice this (Score 2) 178

The easiest way to see price discrimination is to go to the rich side of town and go to the grocery store. Observe the price of milk, hamburger, cheese and gasoline. Now to to the poor side of town, repeat.

OK, I'll bite. The poor side of town has a Grocery Outlet and a local market called a Bruno's. The expensive side of town (such as it is) has a Safeway. Guess what? The prices are better on the cheap side of town. What were you trying to prove again? (Also, our Safeway is fucking disgusting. About half the time you walk in there, you can smell the fish counter... ACROSS THE STORE. And sometimes it's gackworthy. I wouldn't even go in there if my landlord's bank weren't in there.)

What I do notice is that gasoline is often cheaper in more affluent neighborhoods. But that's because those people are willing to drive to somewhere else to fuel up. It's not magic.

Comment Re:Progress (Score 1) 127

Slashdot is making progress. I'm glad to see a discussion on electric cars on this forum where no-one is whining "electric cars will never work, you can't go more than 200 miles without needing to refuel... customers don't want electric..." etc,etc,et.

Yes, it is truly sad how many Slashdotters are so vastly behind the times. They should really fuck off back to CNET where they apparently came from

Comment Re:Okay, but... (Score 1) 127

The US should do similar to put an end to all of these competing charging formats and vertical markets. It's not like Tesla will lose out because they stand to profit regardless of which vehicle is charging at their stations.

You are Just Plain Wrong. The Supercharger network is a competitive advantage. Since no one else offers that, and no one else can charge at those points, as long as Tesla has it and nobody else does, it is a significant inducement to buy Tesla instead of something else. Thus, this is the time for Tesla to lobby against such a move. When other makers have similar networks, then Tesla will want to lobby for charge connector standardization, because that will force them to let Tesla customers use any charger. Once it's no longer a competitive advantage, then it becomes a drawback. Right up until then, it's a massive benefit and they would have to be total idiots unqualified to operate any business to change that part of their game plan.

Comment Re:Privacy (Score 3, Interesting) 74

Seems that the US is actually the anomaly, having a high GDP *but* happily providing all their personal information to be abused by marketeers/advertiser, by three-letter agencies, and by pirates leaking databases and personal photo collections.

I dunno if it is so much "happily provide", but likely last not, too uneducated, ill-informed, or ignorant of the fact that massive data even IS being collected on them, much less the implications of such massive data collection and analyzation can do the people and their privacy.

I'm guessing that sure, a lot of folks wouldn't care, but I would posit that the majority of the populace using social media even is NOT aware of the massive information collection going on, nor how it is used.

Comment Agreemsg (Score 1) 146

It's more of a flying motorcycle, except without any of the advantages of a motorcycle. Presumably the advantages of being able to fly outweigh them, but if you're only allowed to operate over water, you'd probably be better served by a boat. It's a toy. The only time it seems like it would have any actual utility is if you live in some place where you're not allowed to move quickly on the water, but they'd still allow you to operate one of these. Which I suppose could exist... somewhere?

Comment Re:No brainer (Score 4, Insightful) 172

It should be even easier than that.

Archive.org should archive everything, including the robot.txt contents, at each scan.

The content being displayed from the archive.org website itself however could then still honor robots.txt at the time of the scan, purely for "display" purposes.

This way changing robots.txt to block search engines would not delete or hide any previous information.
Also the new information would still be in the archive, even if not displayed due to the current robots.txt directives.

Although it would require more work to do so properly, this would potentially allow for website owners to retroactively "unhide" content in the archive in the past as well.
Proper in this case would require some way to verify the domain owner, but this could likely be as simple as creating another specifically named text file in the websites root path, with content provided by the archive.
That can be as simple as the old school "cookie" data like so many other services use such as Google, or as complex as a standard that allows date ranges specified along with directives.

But in any case, this would preserve copies of the website for future use, such as for when copyright protection expires.
Despite everyone having a differing opinion on just how long "limited time" should be in "securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries", no one who wants to be taken seriously can argue that this time of expiration must happen at some point.
Since the vast majority of authors make no considerations to protect our property, that task clearly needs to fall on us to secure.

Comment Re:Bullshit, Todd. (Score 1) 265

Nobody was forcing them to be parents. They were prepared to be parents and take the financial and emotional responsibility... that was the whole point of the procedure.

Yes, for a child born of their own genes. There are numerous disadvantages to raising a child who is not of your own genes. Such offspring is much less likely to be successful in every way due to a number of factors. Your offspring literally inherits traits you gained during your lifetime. This is important for creating rapport between parent and offspring. Keep in mind that it's a typical instinct for an ape to kill all the offspring of other males when he takes over a female.

Comment Re:How much CO2? (Score 1) 261

It's not that much. The US military (and presumably others) has been experimenting with artificially creating cloud cover for decades. Conspiracy theories aside, there are a couple of relevant patents. One of them basically involves special afterburners, and the other one involves spraying metallics (just like the conspiracy theorists said, whee!)

Whether we should be doing this or not doesn't really have any bearing on whether we should be doing the other things, though. We could do both.

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