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Comment Re:Uhm... (Score 1) 478

Documents 6 bankruptcies, and 13 businesses that closed up shop - at the very least suggests he doesn't know what he's doing.

Business has something in common with war and engineering:
  1 You try a bunch of stuff that looks like it might work.
  2 Some of it works, some of it doesn't.
  3a. You stop doing (and wasting resources on) what doesn't work
  3b, and continue doing more of what does (transferring any remaining resources from the abandoned paths.)
  4. PROFIT!

In business, step 3a is called "a large business environment, major projects are done in separate subsidiary corporations. This uses the "corporate veil" as a firewall, to keep the failed attempts from reaching back and sucking up more resources from what's succeeding. Dropping a failed experiment in step 3a (when it's failed so badly that there's nothing left to salvage in a different attempt's 3b) is called "bankruptcy". It lets you stop throwing good money after bad and move on.

So bankruptcy is NOT necessarily a sign of weakness, stupidity, or lack of business acumen. On the contrary: It shows the decision-maker was smart enough to spend a bit extra to erect the firewall between the bulk of his holdings and the iffy project.

So a successful large-business-empire-operator who is also innovative will usually have a number of bankruptcies in his history. It's no big deal, anyone in business at or near that level knows it, and took it into account if they risked some of their resources in someone else's experiment that failed in the hope of profit if it succeeded.

Also: Someone starting out may have to few resources to run many experiments simultaneously. (Or even a big guy may be reduced to a little guy by too many failures - not necessarily his fault.) So he has to try serially, doing only one or a few at a time. This may mean total bankruptcy, even multiple times, before coming up with something that does work. Lots of successful businessmen went through total bankruptcy, sometimes several times, before hitting it big.

Comment Re:As unpopular as it will be to hear... (Score 1) 143

On the surface I agree with you. In practice, I've gone the other direction and have become more pro-open-source over the years.

One example is MATLAB. I like MATLAB, and consider myself fairly good at it. People come to me to ask MATLAB questions. With that said, my company has floating licenses and these are a pain. Mathworks is very responsive in their customer service, but when you find a bug, you have to work around it or wait until they fix it. On the odd occasion where you want to actually distribute a script, you need to (maybe?) have the end-user download and install the (free as in beer) runtime separately.

I've switched the vast majority of my data analysis and other scripts to Python, and I no longer have to search for co-workers who left their copy of MATLAB open. When I find a bug, I can actually fix it myself and even return the fix to the module's project, along with any other feature that I find to be missing. When I need to distribute a script, I just make sure that I'm not using some forbidden-fruit GPL module (the ecosystem is mostly BSD) and zip the whole shebang up with one of the py-to-exe tools without consulting the frigging lawyer.

It's not all-rosy, for sure. Scientific/technical computing on Python has a higher learning curve than MATLAB. While vast help exists for Python trouble, MATLAB has all of the help concentrated in one place which makes finding solutions easier. One unexpected benefit to Python is the GUI. At first blush, MATLAB holds the high ground with its GUIDE visual GUI builder. But for anything more than a few simple controls, GUIDE is an unholy beast to work with. I've found my life much better with Python and it's wide choice of GUI frameworks. Even setting up the whole GUI with a text editor in Tkinter is worth the up-front time investment vs. the misleading initial ease of using GUIDE.

On the topic of SAS, one product that I do use of theirs is JMP. I have to admit it is faster (for me) for quick-and-dirty data analysis than using Python. I think I'd like to code up a Python application to do some of my most common JMP workflows... not try to reimplement the whole thing.

Comment Re:Block on the phone. (Score 1) 76

True story: I already have a feature to indicate that a call was a Robo Call. When this new feature was introduced on Android, I began using it. Each time I flagged a call as a Robo Call, I had a sense of satisfaction. Before long, Robo Calls would show up on a red screen, so I could choose not to answer. Then they stopped completely. Android 7.1.1

Comment Re:What if RoboCall industry creates jobs? (Score 0) 76

The RoboCall industry needs to refocus its efforts. The Trump administration has expressed that one of its policy goals is to put coal miners back to work. If there are not enough coal mining opportunities available, then put the RoboCall industry onto an isolated telecommunications system such that they can only call each other.

Please hold to speak to an ignorant robot.
Press zero to be routed to a call center in a third world country.

Comment Re:What about beer? (Score 1) 121

I can't tell you anything about beer. But I am an expert on wine.

A good whine will be loud enough to get attention, but not too loud. The finer whines will elicit just the right reaction of sympathy that is the mark of a great whine. The best whines will not only get what you are whining for, but won't leave any after taste of annoyance. Ideally the person being manipulated will believe it was their own idea with no sense of manipulation.

Comment Re:Probably a minor oversight. Will likely be fixe (Score 5, Funny) 228

Please do not knock Emacs.

Emacs is very popular. Popularity seems to correlate highly with the set of users who once started up Emacs, were unable to figure out how to exit from Emacs, then had no choice but to write Emacs Lisp extensions to accomplish all other necessary tasks.

I don't think VS Code can make that claim.

Comment Re:Maybe they shouldn't use Javascript ... (Score 1) 228

Um, excuse me? There is nothing wrong with using Javascript and a cross platform framework for drawing the cursor.

Just be sure that each time the cursor is redrawn (even if it hasn't changed appearance from the last refresh) that you launch that Javascript environment in a fresh sandboxed VM. For safety. Think of the children.

Comment Re:Or... (Score 1) 388

There are people who want to make movies with original ideas. But this involves some amount of risk. So Hollywood won't make it. If you want original ideas, sometimes you find them in independent films. Occasionally one of those makes it big. Sort of like how some musicians can make it without traditional record labels.

Comment Re:Poor business (Score 1) 388

Staring at the score a single reviewer gives is, IMHO, stupid, but taking a look at what thousands of people think gives a much better image of what it's actually like. On Rotten Tomatoes, IMDB and the likes I always look at the user-score, not the critic-score, and pretty often the user-score more-or-less matches with my opinion.

Comment Re:Can't see the forest for all the trees (Score 2) 388

While I agree that there should be more intelligent movies and in particular Sci-Fi; the problem is that a large part of the population prefers ignorance. Hence they are only serving what the market wants. Then they complain that the market doesn't want it and movie attendance is down because the ignorant poor slobs can't pay high enough prices for tickets so that movie executives can afford more blow and hookers.

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