Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Who's to say? (Score 1) 86

How do we know this radiation isn't actually good for you?... - Trump's new director of the Department of Energy.

Don't laugh, it might just happen.

As far as I can tell, her reasoning is something along the lines that if you hit yourself in the forehead with a hammer, your forehead swells with fluids such that the second blow is less severe. Therefore, hammers are good for your forehead.

Comment Re:Public information? (Score 1) 90

a cop can stand there and listen to what you say, even record it if they want. It's a public place.

The difference is that it used to take some effort to track what one person was saying in those public places. With technology making it nearly free, we're all facing every public moment of our entire lives being stored forever in some law enforcement database.

I'm fine with the local police getting copies of business' surveillance tapes, interviewing people, and checking telco logs to piece together my actions, AFTER there has been some credible accusation that I've committed a felony. But doing it all day, every day, in minute detail, storing it forever, etc., is massively crossing a line into police-state territory.

Your argument is akin to peeping toms protesting their innocence because you don't have an expectation of privacy when absolutely anybody could have been standing on a ladder, with a high-powered scope, taking pictures through the crack between the curtains, so it's all your fault, not theirs.

Comment Re:'"We are looking into the matter" (Score 0) 128

I had to read this carefully before I realized that the US state of Georgia was complaining, rather than the country of Georgia.

The word "state" appears EIGHT times in the title and summary. You can read it quite carelessly, and it's still difficult to miss the context.

There's plenty of problems to complain about, here... This is not one of them.

Comment Re:"Feel forced?" (Score 1) 316

No one sat down and said they wantd to make taxis more expensive 'just because'. There are reasons for that extra cost that protect the public

There's certainly some of that, but all too much of it is rent-seeking, lack of modern technology, and hanging onto depreciated business models.

The insane price of NYC taxi medallions for example. Technology allowing drivers to rate passengers, therefore allowing expensive trouble passengers to be left without a lift. Technology allowing passengers to get prices and comparison shop rather than being locked-in to the rates of whichever taxi pulls up, and depending on the route they take. Better utilization by telling drivers where passengers are. Technology that forces passengers to pay without cab drivers needing to tackle cheats. etc.

I have no love for Uber / Lyft abusing their employees, skirting innumerable laws, and throwing money around to try and get themselves exemptions, but it's easy to make the case that the traditional taxi system was incredibly inefficient and rather corrupt, for no good reason.

Comment Re:Snoop Doggy Dog (Score 1) 128

If we assume that government corruption is the impetus...

That was NOT a difference maker this election. Trump has a long, slimy business record such that to expect him to stop being slimy once in office is unrealistic. He even blatantly admitted to bribing most of the candidates on the stage during the GOP debates. I don't see that a pimp is holier than a whore.

I believe he won because he sold the idea that most our security and job problems are caused by outsiders. It's a simple and powerful message from a political marketing standpoint: Nationalism 101.

It's wrong and foolish, but I'm just addressing the sales angle here. Wrong but simple ideas sell better than nuanced but correct ones. Human Nature 101.

Comment Re:Mixed Metaphors (Score 1) 316

The Gendarme isn't going to break down your door and drag you to jail.

While it's true poverty in the modern USA is better than poverty back then, it's still not pleasant.

The implication I jabbed at is that most Uber drivers had plenty of immediate alternative and better income methods. It struck me as flippant and naive.

Comment Re:First world (Score 2) 155

The US economy actually depends on innovation similar to how the Middle East economies depend on oil. We are innovation addicts.

It's a myth that innovation itself is needed to stimulate consumption. There are plenty of existing things people already want, if they simply had the money.

But, anything that becomes a commodity to manufacture or manage gets shipped to cheap 3rd-world manufacturers (C3WM) where labor is cheaper. To maintain the USA's higher cost of living, we have to push the envelope to create new devices and markets that are too cutting edge to be commoditized (yet).

For example, when personal computers were new, they were mostly made in the USA. As they became more of a commodity, their production shifted overseas. Jobs himself used to assemble Apple computers in his garage.

Apple similarly knows they have to push the envelope to avoid being bowled over by C3WM who can throw labor at the problem. The expense and complexity of wireless earphones may seem like overkill now, but if they make Apple products slightly more convenient than the others, they have a sales and marketing edge over the C3WM that allows them to charge a premium.

Eventually the C3WM will catch up in wireless earphones and every phone will support them, and Apple will have to move on to the next Next Big Thing (which is probably already in their lab).

Thus, it's not just a "first world problem", but a first world survival technique (if you want to survive as a first-worlder).

Slashdot Top Deals

A holding company is a thing where you hand an accomplice the goods while the policeman searches you.

Working...