Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment Re:I'm shocked. (Score 1) 528

You're talking about a fundamentally different situation to the rest of us here.

In your example, a remote service on which some functionality depended was disabled. Obviously anything that depends on some remote facility can be affected by changes there, regardless of changes to the local machine. This is a real danger of the kind of always-online systems we have today, and it can be (and certainly has been) abused by developers, but I don't think it was what the rest of us were talking about in this particular discussion.

What we were talking about before was whether Microsoft could forcibly affect a Windows 7 system itself to disable functionality, analogously to the Windows 10 updates that started this discussion. The only change to a local machine in your example appears to be via a software update, which you can choose not to install on Windows 7, while not everyone on Windows 10 has that option, short of actively circumventing Microsoft's system.

The Anniversary update for Windows 10 is particularly troubling, because up to now the only way to restore some of the control that earlier versions of Windows offered (notably including controlling Windows updates themselves) on Windows 10 Pro has been through group policies, and Microsoft have now demonstrated that they are willing to remove even that control mechanism if it suits them.

Comment Re:Windows 10, Windows 10, Windows 10! (Score 1) 480

That doesn't seem like a particularly believable reason. ARM SoCs that might end up in tablets and phones all have at least moderately competent GPUs and the requirements of Aero Glass are pretty trivial even by modern mobile GPU standards (compositing, a token amount of pixel shader). More importantly, offloading rendering to the GPU is more power efficient (which is why Apple pushed as much as possible there starting when laptop sales began to outnumber desktops and continued when iDevices started to become popular).

Comment Re:dark patterns huh? (Score 1) 126

Is it any wonder that UX designers are getting a horrible reputation among some segments of the tech-savvy crowd?

The main reason for this is that people who self-describe as UX experts, as opposed to HCI experts, tend to be the ones that favour form over function and ignore the last 40 or so years of research into how to design useable interfaces. Most of them wouldn't know Fitts' Law if it dragged them to the corner of the screen and made them infinitely long.

Comment Re:How do you regression test that stuff? (Score 1) 308

There isn't much testing of the C bindings. They're also in the process of being deprecated in favour of machine-generated ones that are less API stable and have no ABI stability guarantees (precisely because most people don't actually use them from C, they use them from some other language with C bindings). For everything else, there's a bit regression test suite that works by feeding some code (source code when testing clang, IR or assembly when testing bits of LLVM) into one of the tools and then checking that the output matches. Bugs still slip in quite easily, unfortunately. The second tier of tests involves compiling and running a bunch of benchmarks and similar sample code and checking that they haven't got slower (by a statistically significant margin) and that they still produce the right answers. There's a network of buildbots that runs on a variety of operating systems and architectures that first builds and runs the regression test suite on every commit and then (less frequently) runs the executable tests. These catch most regressions, but not all - the rest are caught by users testing betas and filing bug reports.

There's been a lot of research work on improving this. The LLVM Miscompilation Detector, for example, had a semantic model of LLVM IR and would feed real and randomly-generated IR through the optimisation pipeline and then use a theorem prover to attempt to prove that the semantics of the before and after versions were the same. This could then be combined with the LLVM bugpoint tool to find the optimisation pass that performed an invalid transform.

Comment Re:As a C programmer (Score 1) 308

It's a tradeoff. Blowing away the i-cache is a good way of killing performance, but so is having a load of function calls that do almost no work. If you had to do a virtual method call for comparing two unsigned integers and a different virtual function call for comparing two signed integers when inserting them into a set then you'd have a lot more overhead. In a typical std::set implementation, the compare operations are inlined and so the costs are very low.

The real problem with C++ is that the programmer has to make the decision about whether to use static or dynamic dispatch up front and the syntax for both is very different, so you can't trivially switch between them when it makes sense to do so.

Comment Re: So MS is basically bailing on the phone busine (Score 0) 160

Yes, I am on occasion forced to use MS garbage and I just laugh my ass off every time I do. It's so insanely primitive compared to it's competitors, and buggy as hell to boot. The sheer # of bugs I uncover after just 5 minutes of Windows use is fucking hilarious. Don't even get me started on the shitfest that is Azure, Amazon doesn't even give 2 shits about Azure because it is such a buggy, unreliable mess. Randomly rebooting my web service? Pure brilliance MS, how did you know I wanted that "feature".

C# is also a muddled mess of a programming language, grow up and use a real language that is supported by open standards and doesn't constantly contradict itself.

Comment Re:cost too mcuh (Score 1) 113

Yeah, but at least you get an SD card slot (I think they skipped that with the S6). And a headphone jack. I'm sure Samsung is planning a UFS slot in their next phone, which will completely blow the iPhone out of the water. Apple really needs to start giving people what they want if they want to grow their market and start capturing die-hard Android users.

Comment Re:Samsung tablet user still waiting for Android 6 (Score 1) 113

Updates are the exact reason I left Android and I'm not going back until the problem is fixed. My last phone was Android 2.3 when I bought it, and it was only released 6 months before Android 4 came out. I never saw a single update to that phone. And it was an LG with the Google logo engraved on the back, so you think that Google, or LG, or somebody would stand behind the phone and offer updated software. But nope. Not a single update.

Comment So MS is basically bailing on the phone business? (Score 3, Interesting) 160

What a shock, MS is bailing on the phone business, i.e. an industry where their bully monopolistic practices were useless and they had to rely on their shitty, shitty code, interface, and business practices to compete with competitors who actually know how to make software that isn't a steaming pile of shit. Shocking! But of course, MS won't reverse course on developing shitty bug-ridden software, they have trademarks to protect after all.

Comment Re:I'm shocked. (Score 1) 528

Perhaps the Win10 Pro users will qualify for a refund of some percentage of the $0 they paid for their free upgrade.

Then again, perhaps not, since unlike previous versions Microsoft have made no secret of the fact that they can and will force updates onto Win10 systems, and that the user is required to accept them, and that some of those updates may change or remove functionality instead of adding it.

The Schadenfreude is strong with this one.

Slashdot Top Deals

MOUNT TAPE U1439 ON B3, NO RING

Working...