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Comment Protect you against SQL injection? Really? (Score 2) 82

I would love to hear the explanation of how a general purpose language would protect you against attacks like that, clearly called out in the article.

You're doing the snowflake thing, blaming everyone else for the coders' incompetence and unsuitability for the job. Some dweeb wrote a tutorial and because it's not ready to be cut and pasted into production code, that's the tutorial writer's fault.

NB: Not everyone can code.

Comment Re:Fortran (Score 1) 566

My father showed me basic when I wanted to use the computer as a calculator (basic arithmetic). I discovered programming.

He then saw talent in me and bought me a Turbo Pascal book (in my mother tongue... English would not have worked at that age) and a copy of Turbo Pascal (I presume from work, but... I don't know where exactly he got it from).

... and that's how he awoke my interest in computers and ultimately the profession I would choose.

Thanks dad...

Education

Slashdot Asks: What Was Your First Programming Language? (stanforddaily.com) 566

This question was inspired by news that Stanford's computer science professor Eric Roberts will try JavaScript instead of Java in a new version of the college's introductory computer programming course. The Stanford Daily reports: When Roberts came to Stanford in 1990, CS106A was still taught in Pascal, a programming language he described as not "clean." The department adopted the C language in 1992. When Java came out in 1995, the computer science faculty was excited to transition to the new language. Roberts wrote the textbooks, worked with other faculty members to restructure the course and assignments and introduced Java at Stanford in 2002... "Java had stabilized," Roberts said. "It was clear that many universities were going in that direction. It's 2017 now, and Java is showing its age." According to Roberts, Java was intended early on as "the language of the Internet". But now, more than a decade after the transition to Java, Javascript has taken its place as a web language.
In 2014 Python and Java were the two most commonly-taught languages at America's top universities, according to an analysis published by the Communications of the ACM. And Java still remains the most-commonly taught language in a university setting, according to a poll by the Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education. In a spreadsheet compiling the results, "Python appears 60 times, C++ 54 times, Java 84 times, and JavaScript 28 times," writes a computing professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, adding "if Java is dying (or "showing its age"...) it's going out as the reigning champ."

I'm guessing Slashdot's readers have their own opinions about this, so share your educational experiences in the comments. What was your first programming language?

Comment Re:Money stores value (Score 1) 128

The American Revolution is proof that you are wrong, as they won the war using only paper money.

Might want to brush up on your history a bit. They won despite the paper money, which was a major hindrance. Google for the phrase "not worth a continental". When the constitution was written, the memory of America's first hyperinflation was very fresh in their minds, which is why the gold and silver clause in the constitution forbids fiat currency.

-jcr

Comment Re:The implant requires physical access ... (Score 1) 100

I'm more concerned when the smartTV can be remotely turned into a listening device.

Since this trove was taken it's been shown that most of these devices phone home over plain HTTP, they don't authenticate TLS, or they don't validate payload signatures (and usually more than one of these). And the software that uses those resources doesn't do any error checking.

I'll gladly bet five bucks that simple interception, SSID spoofing, and in-line splicing are all being used for remote exploitation by now either with these or similar devices.

Comment Re:IMAP & SMTP (Score 2) 68

That is because you assume that "Apps" are the same as "Applications" or "Programs". That isn't really the case: "Apps" come from the mobile space and are usually touch optimized dumbed down versions. Often they are just fronts for web applications, instead of full native applications. Applications or programs like Thunderbird are not "Apps", they stand on their own and talk SMTP and IMAP and are compatible with all servers that speak these open protocols. That is inherently superior than proprietary "Apps" that do not talk open protocols.

Comment Re: If he gets busted... (Score 5, Insightful) 87

If users have their devices bricked, they may simply buy another vulnerable IoT device to replace it, perhaps from the same manufacturer.

Are you suggesting there are people who will keep buying the same type of e.g. WiFi lightbulbs that work for a couple hours and then stop working, without returning them?

A return usually costs more than the profit on a device; it's an economically valid feedback mechanism assuming that kind of person isn't actually common. It seems unlikely to me that it is the typical behavior pattern.

Comment Re:If he gets busted... (Score 2) 87

It is unfortunate that retribution type attacks are not considered "appropriate".

Self-defense is not retribution. Third-party defense is always considered valid when a threat is imminent.

All the data we have shows that devices that are vulnerable to Mirai, et. al. will become Mirai bots in a short amount of time, and will begin attacking third-party Internet infrastructure.

If somebody can show the above claim to be false, please do so, showing reason and evidence.

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