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Comment Re:I'm shopping for a phone now (Score 1) 397

My stereo has neither USB nor bluetooth, and damned if I'm gonna buy a new stereo with my new phone.

A bluetooth receiver costs all of $5... I've got a couple to retrofit otherwise decent (and expensive) older car stereos/entertainment systems. The sound quality of bluetooth in general is no match for hard-wired, but it's an option.

My concerns are much more practical... FM radio is a nice option to have in phones, and the headphone cord doubles as the antenna. Bluetooth obviously can't do that.

I also like the no-brainer ability to just plug in a cord and everything works... No navigating menus to select the device you want to send sound to.

I also flatly refuse to hassle with a bunch of different devices with separate batteries that need routine recharging. That's the only reason I don't carry around a bluetooth earpiece and keyboard with my phone... If they could both securely clip-on to my phone and have contacts allowing them to recharge their own batteries from my (larger) phone while not in-use, I'd love to have them. Until that happens, no go. My corded ear-buds (sitting in my bag for years) will be ready to go whenever I want with no maintenance.

Comment Re:Atrix (Score 3, Informative) 97

I'd like to see this with bluetooth instead of a dock so you can just leave the phone in your pocket. Not sure if the bandwidth would work though.

One of the big things the Lapdock provided was POWER to the phone... Can't get that if you leave your phone in your pocket.

And no, bluetooth doesn't provide remotely enough speed for screen updates... WiFi is faster, but still not realistically fast enough, and you'd have to lose your internet connectivity to use it that way. Not to mention your phone would be consuming a lot of power just to refresh the screen, instead of doing any useful work.

Comment Gets the history wrong (Score 4, Informative) 397

The headphone jack has worked for 50 years and it can work for another 50 more because it's universal.

50 years ago, most everyone's headphone jacks were 1/4" (6.35mm), and only monaural. They introduced 3.5mm (still mono) way back when, but almost nobody was using them until much more recently. When stereo was needed, two 3.5mm jacks/pins were used side-by-side. It was only more recently that 3-connector stereo jacks were introduced.

They also shrunk it again to 2.5mm, which was popular on dumb phones and 2-way radios, but that one didn't catch on too well. But you can just as easily say that sub-mini plug has been around for decades, so we should all be happy to use that...

And they added a 4th conductor, most often for video (but possibly for a microphone), but nobody agreed to a standard so the wiring is always incompatible between devices, and that didn't catch on very well, either.

Comment Apple Laptop (Score 1) 50

Years ago Apple had a laptop that let you switch out an internal module. You could add a device, such as high capacity drive, without changing the form factor. The advantage was high speed and plug and play. It was not a success because these were not good values and you still had to carry all this stuff around with the added mass of casing and connectors.

I can't imagine what the benefit of this would be. USB is fast, the connector small. You can probably get all this stuff cheaper, maybe even lighter, as standalone components. The connectors seem to be way more metal than a USB C. If the issue is multiple devices without a hub, the we need to find a daisy chain solution this is both USB and FireWire.

Comment Re: Analogue vs Digital, and DRM (Score 2) 397

The one good critism is DRM. Right now I can't watch movies on my desktop because my monitor is not HDMI. Which means content providers can block the headphones as well when the jack goes away.

Which I think it will. I see more kids using Bluetooth headphones. Think in a few year all the cool kids will use these. I wonder if you can pair multiple headphones to the same device?

Comment Re:unpasteurised milk is way better (Score 1) 249

WebMD is paid by the FDA, which receives its funding from big pharma and, yes, the corporate farming lobby.

WebMD only re-posted a press release. They had nothing to do with the study. It was done by Johns Hopkins.

There is no link to the report,

So because it will take a non-trivial amount of effort for you to find, it doesn't exist, and therefore can be dismissed out-of-hand?

All the actual peer-reviewed articles you posted referred to raw-milk cheese,

That's complete nonsense. Some do refer to cheese, but many more do not.

You're clearly a sick, sick man, and should seek professional psychiatric help as soon as possible.

Comment Re:So they are being obtuse on purpose, right? (Score 2) 42

People want cheaper service... They think ala carte will do that, but if it doesn't end up being cheaper, then they really DON'T want it.

Prepaid cellular service was a big factor in getting prices down. Fees couldn't be hidden remotely as easily, and people could switch from one service to another at any time without concern about 2-year contracts.

It's possible that prepaid TV service will start to reform the cable industry in the same ways. It certainly can't hurt, as they're under attack by Netflix and others.

Personally, I advise just about everyone to put up a good old TV antenna. The vast majority of the country has hundreds of channels (including sub-channels) of very high-quality TV broadcasts over the air, which you can receive for as little as $30 in equipment, one-time charge.

Comment Re:Maggie Griffin Approved Idea (Score 1) 249

Or, how about we just sell milk in bag-in-boxes like they do in other countries. They can sit on the shelf for up to 6 months as long as they're not opened.

You're talking about UHT (ultra-high temperature pasteurization) milk. It's widely available, but not even slightly popular because it just tastes HORRID. I can buy a quart of UHT at my nearby dollar store. Would you like to guess why I NEVER do that? Because it simply tastes HORRIBLE.

Cans of evaporated or condensed milk have even longer shelf-lives. Ditto for powered milk. But all of them taste little to nothing like fresh milk.

The big news with this low-temperature treatment, is that they claim it can extend the shelf life WITHOUT changing the taste at all. Not at all true for UHT.

Comment Re:unpasteurised milk is way better (Score 1) 249

Your conspiracy theory fails on numerous counts:

It's fact, not propaganda that "Raw milk causes more than half of all milk-related foodborne illnesses in the United States, even though only about 3.5 percent of Americans drink raw milk".

Your grand conspiracy doesn't involve just the FDA, but instead a multitude of research institutes, like Johns Hopkins, whose scientific findings, across the board, shows significant dangers from drinking raw milk:
- http://www.webmd.com/food-reci...

Here's just a few pages of references you can read through:

- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...
- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...
- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...
- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...
- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...
- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...
- http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v...

The dairy council doesn't pay out any money to the CDC, and they're the ones who are warning the public about the dangers of raw milk:
- http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/...

The Dairy Council is a piss-poor choice as a Bond-villain... It isn't remotely as big, rich, and powerful as the many other organizations and industries that public health authorities have put the kibosh on. Think "Big Tobacco" in comparison to "Big Milk". Except milk is trivial to render safe, while tobacco is not.

The Dairy Council could make just as much money from raw milk as it does from pasteurized, so there's little or no motivation for them to launch an expensive grand conspiracy.

In short, you're just like any other run-of-the-mill nut-job. Instead of UFOs, vaccinations, fluoridation, or HAARP, your preferred pseudo-scientific nonsense based around raw milk.

Feel free to do your own searches and give me a list of studies which have shown health benefits from raw milk, and NO additional danger from it's consumption, unlike EVERYTHING I just linked you to... I'll be waiting for your pages and pages of citations in response.

Comment Re:How Much? (Score 1) 71

I thought that much was obvious, but for those who have not been paying attention, we are close to using up our hydrocarbons.

Maybe four centuries for all sources of fossil carbon, hydrogenated or otherwise, depending on usage rate.

Remember that "reserves" means "the stuff we already found while exploring". Nobody with a financial clue spends today's private money exploring for stuff they won't be digging up and selling for decades. So you only have more than about 20 years of "reserves" when there have been giant finds, the known reserves are too expensive to exploit and there might be easier stuff out there, or too much of the known reserves are unexploitable due to things like government intervention. There's no doubt quite a lot more out there, though it's still finite.

Running out is not a disaster. We can easily make all the stuff that's made from oil and there are other energy sources - including more coming down the pipeline. We're only digging/pumping up most of our energy and much of our chemical feedstocks right now because it's CHEAPER than the alternatives.

But it's not cheaper by much. (Photovoltaic is now becoming competitive with grid power in many areas, even without government market distortions, and the tech just keeps improving.)

By the time the fossil fuels run out we'll have lots of alternatives, and they'll run out by gradually getting more expensive, so people will smoothly transition to alternatives (thanks to Adam Smith's "Invisible Hand"). The main problem (if the CO2->global warming conjecture is true and substantial) will be keeping the Earth from crashing into the next orbital-mechanics driven Ice Age (as humans MAY have been doing for about the last 10,000 years or so, as the orbital climate-forcing has been curving down steadily.)

Comment Caller id spoofing already broke that. (Score 1) 119

The real way to handle it is to create an open source shared black list, have people sign up for a service, and vote when they answer a call on whether or not it is a telemarketer or robo-call.

Caller ID spoofing already broke block lists. By the time a call gets to your local telco there is no way even for them to tell where it really came from. They regularly spoof their identity - often as others they're robo-calling, or even as the phone they are calling.

IMHO the only way available currently is to trace back a particular call, from telco to telco, to see where it DID come from - then go after the actual robocaller. (Good luck getting that implemented, though. Or getting it to work across all countries, rather than letting the spammers run from safe havens.)

Comment Re: drone ship landings require a lot less fuel? (Score 1) 101

I don't need to stand by the rotation theory. However, the 2.5 degrees that the Earth rotates are about equivalent to the downrange distance.

The first stage is going about 1/5 of the target LEO orbital velocity at separation. While you might well model the trajectory as a parabola over flat ground, given the lack of fuel I would expect that SpaceX puts a lot more care into their trajectory. So far I've failed to attract the attention of the person responsible for Flight Club, the most trusted modeling of SpaceX flights, but I'll message him directly.

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