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Comment Re:Blocking is illegal, but this isn't... (Score 1) 168

They where NOT preventing anybody from operating on any spectrum they wished, you could walk outside of the venue and crank up your WiFi hotspot anytime you wished. Private property owners have the right to allow or deny any activity on their property they choose

C'mon, that's so obviously not true I'm not sure how you finished typing it. Anyway, the airwaves are special. You can't charge a fee to have access to them on your property. (So many things are special that it's hard to think of them as special cases these days - there are exceptions to just about everything you wrote - for example, you can't make rules that have the effect of excluding black people from your property. There's lots of case law around dress codes.) Excluding is different from restricting to only those who pay a fee.

If we don't have such property rights in this country, then why do we call it "private property"?

Conservatives asking that for years now. Just try creating a pond on your property!

Comment Re: Questions to Hillary's fans (Score 1) 250

freaking out over the thought of a transgender person sharing a public bathroom with them or their kids

Maybe, I don't know them, but most conservatives are freaking out over the thought of a man in the girls room. There are more sexual predators than transsexuals, after all (and lots more horny teen boys), so opening the door to any man who throws on a dress seems like a poor choice. And when it's some random guy who threw on a dress, it's rather easy to tell.

But it doesn't matter: it's just as silly to care about being called *phobic, or misogynist - all just like racist, overused to the point of nonsense.

Last by definition conservatives hold us back.

Ah, so you're not an engineer. All good engineers are conservative, because almost all clever new ideas that look good to experts and everything thinks are cool are crap. Good engineering is pushing back against fads and opinions, being highly skeptical of everything new, and accepting changes only after they've been proven to be better in conditions relevant to your product. That allows change to come faster, because fucking up is expensive.

This is why we test software before we ship (or at least companies that can't get away with fucking their customers do). Is that test suite "holding you back"?

But in your head, "conservative" probably means "stupid, greedy, mean person", and not "someone skeptical of new ideas", so you probably think I'm crazy.

Comment Re:Seriously...music off YouTube...? (Score 1) 307

Congrats - you just added 25 point to your score on the crackpot index. Well done. (There should really be points for saying "questioning the fundamentals is the foundation of science", but oddly that's missing from the index.)

My wife has extra-sensory perception in both sight and sound. I'll trust her senses over your denial any day.

Heh, I assume you meant you'll trust her perceptions, since you just claimed she can perceive things beyond her senses.

Comment Re:1Million People (Score 1) 488

Do these [abc.net.au] look like Mar's rovers to you?

No, and:

1) ... nor would you have the payload capacity to send something like that
2) ... nor would something like that survive the Martian environment (dust, radiation, cold, pressures low enough for outgassing, difficulty with radiating excessive heat, etc)
3) ... nor can you use that sort of power source on Mars
4) ... nor do you have people there to do the (extreme) sort of maintenance such a vehicle requires
5) ... nor do they do the most complex operations, only doing the (proportionally very simple) ferrying operations
6) ... nor do they have to avoid risk at all cost due to the lack of people there to fix it if it goes awry and hits something
6) ... nor do they have to avoid risk at all cost due to the lack of people there to fix *whatever it might run into* if it goes awry and hits something. ... and about fifty other things.

The ISS is just floating there doing nothing.

Deflection. The question was, in construction and research on ISS, do they use the available human labour, or do they send robots to do it? Of course robots are used where there aren't humans, but that's not the topic of discussion; we're talking about a world where there's a human settlement on Mars. You're arguing that robots outcompete humans in a space environment where humans are. Well, we have precisely one space environment where humans are - ISS. Where are all of the robots outcompeting them?

I'll reiterate:

It's certainly an arguable point as to whether it's worth the cost sending humans in the first place - but once they're there, there's no debate at all about whether it's cheaper to use their labour or to engineer, build, and send robots to do the same task.

Comment Re:Remeber game box covers? (Score 1) 253

ASCII? You spoiled child, back in my day our games graphics were displayed with blinking readout lights on a board. Old Flashey, we used to call that board. A game of "Hit The Button At The Right Time" used to cost a dime, which was two hours wages at the time, but oh, how I sunk so many dimes into Old Flashey...

Comment Re:How come? (Score 1) 253

I actually liked the gameplay concept. There's nothing wrong with the concept for many people. The problem is that they failed to actually deliver the concept.

I think the difference between the concept and the reality does, however, lay bare a more important element. What most people want out of procgen isn't just that the algorithms can generate diversity... it's that they can generate scenarios that even the coders wouldn't have expected. Some algorithms can do that. Others cannot. NMS's absolutely cannot, they're just standard fractal noise terrain with random primitives, animals that are just armatures with random parts swapped out, etc. For anyone thinking of taking up the mantle of such a game after the failure of NMS, I think that's really going to be a key aspect. Because players are always going to explore worlds faster than developers can make new content, so if your engine is limited to making "things that the devels have thought of", it's always going to wear thin rather quickly.

The real world we live in always keeps presenting new fascinating worlds every time we explore a new place, for a key reason. Real worlds are built by fluid and rigid body interactions (primarily fluid, at least on the large scale) with variable chemistry. Physical properties like viscosity vary over numerous orders of magnitude in different pressure and temperature environments, and there's thousands of different chemical constituents that can be found in bulk, depending on the environment. Furthermore, each body is exposed to anisotropic conditions (bombardment, solar radiation, Coriolis force due to its rotation, etc), and widely varying local conditions like gravity. Basically, the computer equivalent would be CFD with chemical equilibria. Now, of course you can't do some extreme-detail CFD simulation of planets in realtime. But IMHO, if you want interesting generation, you want a generation algorithm that can emulate these sort of *effects*, even if the underlying core mechanism is radically different. Terrain generation algorithms generally make a goal of emulate the effects of uplift/folding, erosion, volcanism, impacts, etc. Recognizing how radically, many-orders-of-magnitude different these can all be in different environments, and with different materials in the same environment, seems key to making landscapes that can defy even creator expectations.

I think Pluto should be the gold standard. Before NH arrived, who would have thought that what we'd find was a giant scar facing Charon where the mantle bubbles out in supermassive convection cells, with mountain-sized icebergs drifting around the soup and collecting in iceberg-mountain ranges on the shore (just to name a couple of the really bizarre things New Horizons discovered)? The issue isn't "could you code a generation algorithm to emulate Pluto?"; of course one can. The question is, "could you code a generation algorithm that would have come up with things as weird as Pluto, without having to explicitly spell them out, without you ever having seen them before"?

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