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Comment Re:Paying customers and age appropriate roles (Score 1) 255

Is it possible to fix? Maybe. Won't be easy though. The key would be proving that age discrimination is actually harmful to the economic outcome for a film. Challenging case to make since they don't let a lot of people who aren't white and young (if women) into movies to test the theory.

I suspect it's also going to be a challenging case to make because it's wrong. They simply also make movies which appeal to that audience, which is not interested in big special effects and whatnot. Different audience, different budget, different casting. And different release strategy as well; many of those movies are direct-to-video.

United Kingdom

UK's Top Police Warn That Modding Games May Turn Kids into Hackers (vice.com) 140

Joseph Cox, writing for Motherboard: Last week at EGX, the UK's biggest games event, attendees got a chance to play upcoming blockbusters like Battlefield 1, FIFA 17, and Gears of War 4. But budding gamers may also have spotted a slightly more unusual sight: a booth run by the National Crime Agency (NCA), the UK's leading law enforcement agency. Over the last few years, the NCA has attempted to reach out to technologically savvy young people in different ways. EGX was the first time it's pitched up to a gaming convention; the NCA said it wanted to educate young people with an interest in computers and suggested that those who mod online games in order to cheat may eventually progress to using low level cybercrime services like DDoS-for-hire and could use steering in the right direction. "The games industry can help us reach young people and educate them on lawful use of cyber skills," Richard Jones, head of the NCA's National Cyber Crime Unit's 'Prevent' team, told Motherboard in an email. "Through attendance at EGX and various other activities, we are seeking to promote ethical hacking or penetration testing, as well as other lawful uses of an interest in computers to young people," Jones said.

Comment Re:Too much money... (Score 1) 130

Uber is trying desperately to use up all that money they were given based on their (relatively simple) app. An app that they can't even make profitable. Apparently they lost around $1.2B in the first half of the year.

If they don't use it up, there's a risk they might eventually be asked to give it back.

Comment Re:Scale and power vs weight (Score 1) 130

Are you seriously arguing that because we've done it with an RC airplane that it is a trivial exercise to scale up to the size where it can plausibly carry humans safely? Yeah it doesn't work like. The energy costs to get aloft do not scale linearly with size. The bigger the vehicle + cargo the more fuel you need to lift PLUS you need more fuel to lift the extra fuel. This places upper limits on what can practically get aloft and how long you can stay there.

Several outfits have now demonstrated an electric multicopter large enough to carry a human for twenty minutes.

Plus even if you deal with the technical problems getting it to be economically viable is a MUCH harder problem. Helicopters have been a thing for a long time but they remain hugely expensive and problematic for use by the General Public.

It doesn't have to be affordable to every tom, dick and asshole. It doesn't have to be viable everywhere in the country. It only has to be viable in a large enough market to afford a few such aircraft. Also, helicopter air taxi services are a thing. People with more money than you or I regularly use them.

Comment Re:The poor economics of flying cars (Score 1) 130

1) Physics. The energy requirements to get something the weight of a human aloft are considerable. The fuel costs alone would make it economically prohibitive.

Show your math. I'm sure someone would be willing to pay at least that part.

A VTOL aircraft is necessarily going to be more expensive than a standard automobile because it is more complicated and thus more expensive. Even the simplest imaginable version would be far more expensive than what anyone but the super wealthy could afford.

They don't actually make any sense unless they are autonomous, because you're just having to pay the fuel penalty for the pilot — who can reasonably be replaced by a computer the size of your testicle.

None of the infrastructure for any plausible flying vehicle has been built excepting for airports.

Well, that is most of the required infrastructure. You can use their radio navigation beacons.

The cost to change this would be astronomical. Can you imagine trying to land in the parking lot of your local Walmart without the prop wash endangering everyone around you?

We're talking about a lightweight vehicle by definition. It won't take much of a rooftop pad for it to land on.

A much bigger problem is that you really need to not have a pilot, and there's no FAA framework whatsoever that would permit transporting passengers by drone.

Comment Re:VTOL planes a/k/a Widowmakers (Score 1) 130

There's a reason that both the Harrier and Osprey are called the Widowmaker.

I've heard that about the Osprey, but not the Harrier.

I doubt a commercial VTOL Uber plane will be a reality in my lifetime due to liability concerns.

Why not? People can use helicopters in cities, and they're dangerous as heck.

Comment Re:Hollywood discriminates on age, race, gender... (Score 3, Insightful) 255

It seems unlikely to me that Hollywood has an age discrimination issue.

Oh they certainly do have an age discrimination issue, particularly for female actresses.

Society has an age discrimination issue. Most of us, even women, would rather look at a fresh-faced young girl than at a woman with lines on her face. We'd rather look at perky boobs than saggy ones. Is it even possible to fix the problem of age bias in Hollywood, and if so, would that actually help address the problem of age discrimination in society? Or would there just be a lot of bitching about how feminist laws are compromising entertainment, ala Ghostbusters? (I don't have an opinion on that movie, which I haven't seen; I'm only characterizing the complaints.)

If an actor doesn't look the age for a part, they're not going to get the role.

That might have some credibility if they didn't also hire actresses who do not look the role at all. See Emma Stone in Aloha. See whitewashing. Same thing happens with them hiring actresses who are FAR too young for the role they are playing.

Yeah, I thought that was a bullshit argument, too. The truth is that they're going to hire the prettiest, most popular actress to play the role, and part of that means hiring the youngest one that can more or less carry it off because that's what puts asses in seats. I shouldn't have to be the one to tell you this, either. The degree to which youth equals beauty has been explored nigh unto death by everyone and their mom, especially as she ages.

Comment Re:Look a bit higher (Score 1) 293

The over .55, under 55 pound RC aircraft must carry a registration number in plain site.

Nope. It just has to be easily accessible. It can be inside a battery door if the cover doesn't screw on.

If you own four of them, all four must carry that number.

Yes. Which drives home the point that this is not a registration number for your model aircraft, but for the operator.

Comment Re: Yup (Score 1) 293

Unless you own the land outside the city you plan to fly on I wouldn't suggest that either.

Some of us live in areas with substantial public lands which are not wildlife preserves. Now, to be fair, my local BLM land is also a MOA, and in theory people aren't supposed to fly model aircraft in special operational areas. But on the flip side...

There is a reason there are rc clubs with private airstrips and tracks.

...a famous rc club strip in the Mojave is also in a MOA. And aircraft are allowed to use MOAs without permission at their own risk, so it seems like so long as I obey all the usual restrictions (max 400' AGL, LoS or in communication with a spotter with LoS) that's not a problem.

I could also just go fly at Highland Springs reservoir, which (like my house) is within the 5 mile circle around the local airport, if I just notify them ahead of time. One is not required to ask permission either, although they'd surely let me know if there were going to be firefighting aircraft in the area, at which point I wouldn't be permitted to fly. The only place around an airport where you're really not allowed to fly is within a certain relatively short distance around the air strips of controlled airports themselves. You can fly RC around private airstrips (as in, for real aviation) with permission, but you are required to keep a certain distance from actual aircraft in operation.

Comment Re: Look a bit higher (Score 1) 293

Oh, for pete's sake you can't shoot people for trespassing on your property either, but that doesn't mean your property is fair game for anyone who wants to tramp around on it.

That's a pretty great analogy, though. I wouldn't argue that invading someone's privacy or even just noise polluting their airspace isn't being a dickhead. I'd only argue that shooting down a drone with a shotgun when you could start a fire is being a stupid dickhead. It's also unnecessary. Odds are someone is just GPS drifting. If you think otherwise, gather some evidence like an adult. Nine times out of ten, the drone pilot is your neighbor, not a bunch of houses over. The further you get away from home around other people's houses and thus potential sources of interference with both your TX signal and with GPS, the greater the chance you're going to wind up leaving it in their yard or on their roof.

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