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Comment Research Paper (Score 1) 48

https://cias.rit.edu/media/upl...

Luminescence can be used to create a depth map using two offset images.

3D movies and VR headsets don't work for everyone and create headaches for a variety of reasons, one probably being the lack of bit depth. It's much harder to judge depth when the colors are so close together.

Comment Re:How much CO2? (Score 1) 153

It's not that much. The US military (and presumably others) has been experimenting with artificially creating cloud cover for decades. Conspiracy theories aside, there are a couple of relevant patents. One of them basically involves special afterburners, and the other one involves spraying metallics (just like the conspiracy theorists said, whee!)

Whether we should be doing this or not doesn't really have any bearing on whether we should be doing the other things, though. We could do both.

Comment Re:DRONE ON (Score 1) 153

On top of that, it's a stupid fucking argument to be making. Carbon emissions are not evenly distributed. A handful of the worlds rich assholes (read: us) are doing the vast majority of the climate change (See figure 1).

India and China are trying as hard as they can to come up to our levels of carbon release. This is a problem that has to be solved at a deeper level. It has to simply be cheaper not to pollute. Therefore this is where the bulk of the research should be going.

Comment Re:Libreoffice is a thing (Score 2) 116

This is about Microsoft's non-subscription version of Office being able to access the corporate version of OneDrive, so LibreOffice won't help here.

It'd be interesting to see the FOSS community come up with an equivalent to OneDrive (if we could somehow do it without needing a central server, that'd be a major step forward) but a FOSS office suite isn't going to help.

Comment Re:Time to switch (Score 1) 116

Those will still work with the business version of OneDrive after 2020? Or did you misunderstand the summary and think Microsoft is deactivating Office 2016 in 2020 completely?

What Microsoft is announcing is relatively obscure and probably won't affect many people at all. Home users will be completely unaffected. Businesses are largely moving over to Office 365 anyway, the combination of "Corporate OneDrive + non-subscription Office" is pretty unusual.

Switching over to the Mac (or, more easily, to LibreOffice/OpenOffice) won't help in the slightest.

Comment Re:Money stores value (Score 1) 109

The American Revolution is proof that you are wrong, as they won the war using only paper money.

Might want to brush up on your history a bit. They won despite the paper money, which was a major hindrance. Google for the phrase "not worth a continental". When the constitution was written, the memory of America's first hyperinflation was very fresh in their minds, which is why the gold and silver clause in the constitution forbids fiat currency.

-jcr

Comment Re:Could climate science be affected, too? (Score 1) 109

I'm a scientist and I don't give two shits about any "authority" of science and have little unreserved trust in peer review. Likewise for "true science", whatever that is. Those are terms that apply more to religion or politics, which you can keep for yourself.

Science, as far as I'm interested in it, is all about well controlled variables and repeatability. I've seen plenty of published work that I'm skeptical about and what I take away from those works is that they can't be trusted. Implying that all of science (or the scientific method) is phony because some published results are fishy is incredibly simple-minded.

Comment Re:It would be... (Score 1) 200

I'm not sure it would help against your pretty sever case of confirmation bias. In my commute there is a great percentage of cars doing stupid shit that endanger other people, and there are seldom any cyclists doing that.

About fifty percent of the cyclists I see on the road are doing something spectacularly stupid. These things range from riding the wrong direction to completely ignoring signals and signs. Perhaps this has to do with where I am driving, which is primarily around Napa, Lake, Sonoma, and Mendocino counties. I am very cautious around cyclists, because it doesn't matter who is right and who is wrong, I don't want to kill some schmuck with no appreciation for the laws of physics.

Comment Re: Systemd! (Score 1) 197

AMD driver support is and always has been a PITA. This continues to be true, although many people say that it is becoming less true. Meanwhile, nVidia Linux driver support is more of a PITA than it was back in the olden days, so there's really nothing to be happy about unless you're an intel fan.

Comment Re: The problem is depth perception (Score 1) 48

You can get a depth from a single camera if the object or scene is suitably lit.

People do it with IR. But it's pretty crap, and it can be fooled by some surfaces and materials. And when you talk about what people are actually looking at doing in cars for full autonomy, it's combining normal visual cameras with lidar and radar.

Comment Re:Not so much fantasy since 2010 (Score 1) 156

Getting a person there with something better than chemical rockets is just fantasy since if you got the vehicle to move fast enough even the cosmic background radiation will be shifted enough to irradiate people to death.

You have to be traveling at 0.999999 c before the cosmic background radiation becomes visible, but not yet even ionizing. Even with local variations in the background, you need to be well over 0.9999 c before it becomes dangerous. There's plenty of usable velocity below 0.9999 c!

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