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Comment Re:Same could be said for color TV (Score 3, Interesting) 379

The problem with 3D is the glasses - without the glasses, 3D would be a nice enhancement, much like color.

Well maybe... but if I'm watching a GoT episode do I really want to feel like I'm flipping from being 1m away from a combat scene to suddenly being 50 meters up in the air overlooking the battlefield and back down to 1m again in a matter of seconds? Just saying that maybe we want some kind of grounding that we're really watching a screen and not teleporting around.

Comment Re:There will be commercials (probably) (Score 2) 145

Yeah we've seen the "no commercials" promise before when cable TV was becoming a thing and it was bullshit then too. They'll only stay away from commercials long enough to get a subscriber base. Commercials are where most of the money is and it will be hard for them to ignore that fact. I have a hard time imagining Netflix being immune to the siren's call of that much cash forever.

Is it really? Take the Superbowl which is one of the few items where we have pretty much all the numbers. In 2014 there was 49 minutes 15 seconds of commercials, $4.5 million average per 30 second slot and 111.4 million viewers. That works out to a little less than $4 per viewer. So if you offered $5 to watch it ad-free you'd be beating the advertisers. That's not bad for about four hours of entertainment with both a football game and the half time show and it's supposed to be super-expensive compared to normal ads. Granted one display != one viewer so they'd have to charge more than $5 but still I bet there's a lot of people who'd like to out-bid the advertisers.

Comment Re:And ISPs are jacking up rates (Score 1) 145

The real reason net neutrality is on the ropes is this: the idea was barely discussed by anyone during the election, in comparison to other issues. The companies that stand to profit from net neutrality are electronic media companies, and the companies that stand to profit from its removal are electronic infrastructure companies, and both will continue their fight under the covers. There wasn't much input from the electorate on the topic at all this cycle.

Actually I think it's way more old media vs new media, here in Norway where the main broadband revolution was DSL from telcos and the fiber revolution was lead by a former power company the "electronic infrastructure companies" seem pretty happy just to sell you bits and bytes. My impression is that in the US it's different because so large a part of the American population get their broadband through cable. It seems both bandwidth caps and anti-net neutrality gouging is primarily driven by cable companies wanting to drive customers to their own services instead of using online services and remain the gatekeeper and middle man between the content and the customers.

Comment Re:Can it beat the doctors (Score 1) 153

Yes, and we already have that. There are people who die every day waiting for a transplant organ. There's a limited amount available so they must be rationed and someone (or a panel of people most likely) has to determine where the limited supply will do the most good.

That's what other western countries do. The US goes by who has the best health insurance, like how big of a bill can we justify sending...

Comment Re:Down with Putin - Down with Trump (Score 1) 272

Yes. Timing is the key to understanding it. Sanders would have defeated Trump easily. The timing of the releases were carefully placed so as to build suspicion with independants while not hurting her primary bid. Then once she clenched that, proof that it was a rigged primary sent a lot of independants away from the DNC to either Green, Libertarian, and even a number to Trump. If they had released it all in the beginning, we would be swearing in Sanders tomorrow.

Let's not forget that the DNC wanted Trump to win the Republican nomination. So first Trump let Hillary drag him center stage as the enemy, then he let her eliminate Sanders before landing a final blow nobody saw coming until late election night? If all of that was planned Machiavelli could take lessons from him. If could simply be that they know the media has the attention span of a humming bird on speed, let's just pace this out so we get a good buzz and can keep it going until the election and that the rest was plain lucky. It's either that or we're in a Bond movie.

Comment Re:1 point for Obama (Score 1) 794

I think someone as adept in the spook world as Snowden is would likely have a hidden stash somewhere. But that doesn't matter wrt this argument.

What matters here is that there is a very real and significant possibility that he could do something more. As long as that possibility exists, he can not be granted a blanket pardon. He could certainly be pardoned for specific offenses for past activity, but first those need to be specified by indictment, which has yet to be done.

We could argue over whether the possibility is 10% or 1% or 0.01%, but that would be foolish. You cannot completely argue away the possibility, and there can be no blanket pardon under these conditions.

Maybe a car analogy is necessary here. Obama, and every sitting President, has the power to pardon Johnny Queue Publique at any time after JQP has been accused of stealing a car. But there is no provision that would allow JQP to be pardoned for a car theft that has not yet occurred. The President cannot give anyone a free pass to steal a car tomorrow. Not even President Trump will be allowed to do that, any tweets to the contrary not withstanding.

Comment Re:1 point for Obama (Score 1) 794

A serious technical detail in granting pardon to Snowden is that there is no way to determine if his "crimes" are completed.

With Manning there is no question that the acts that put him in prison are done and history. With Nixon there was a similar situation, since he could not have possibly continued his illegal/unethical acts after he was removed from office. But with Snowden ----he is still sitting on a lot of material that may have all kinds of consequences if it is released, or may even be affecting events now, without being released, if he is using some of it to blackmail someone.

I'm not saying that he is doing any of that or would do any of that. I'm merely pointing out that the kind of actions that he could be brought to trial for are not necessarily complete, so a blanket pardon should not be done as yet.

I can only see two ways Snowden could be granted a pardon. Either he is brought into the USA justice system and charged with crimes ---then he could be pardoned of just those crimes, even before the trial is done. But he needs to indicted for specific crimes. Or the other way is that he could be given a blanket pardon on his deathbed, when he clearly has no ability to do anything more.

I am glad that Snowden did what he has done and in my opinion he is a true American patriot. But the very system that he has worked to fix cannot grant him a blanket pardon at this time.

Comment Re:...Or Just Take Aspirin. (Score 2) 99

Excedrin and other APC preparations have only one benefit over plain aspirin swallowed with coffee: for some people, there is a beneficial placebo effect with certain brand names. More power to them.

However to some extent the placebo effect is dependent on ignorance that you have been given a placebo, so if you used to find that Excedrin worked better than aspirin with coffee, I may have just destroyed that benefit for you. Too bad. Find another sugar pill.

Acetaminophen (paracetamol, Tyelnol) is no more effective than aspirin (acetylsalicilic acid or ASA) in pain relief, and IIRC, does not potentiate with ASA nor are the two taken together any better than either one taken alone when taken in the usual recommended adult doses. But I'm pulling that from 30 year old memories from my days as an RN so someone could check on that.

There are downsides to both acetaminophen and aspirin.

Too much acetaminophen can irreversibly damage your liver, possibly leading to death or a liver transplant. Since the stuff is indiscriminately added to a huge number of pain relief compounds, it is possible to OD without realizing it, especially for those who think that since the Excedrin they took 15 minutes ago isn't taking care of the headache, they'll just take some Tylenol now, and maybe wash it down with Alka Seltzer Plus. Bye bye, sucker! (BTW, if you are contemplating suicide, don't do it with a couple of bottles of Tylenol. For if the paramedics get to you in time to pump your stomach and save you, you will live the rest of your short miserable life without a working liver, and that is hell on you, and everyone who has to breathe the stenches you emit.)

Too much aspirin can permanently damage your hearing, or kill you in a number of different ways, or turn you into a semi vegetable through bleeding into your brain. One thing is that an early sign of a mild OD is tinnitus, which is a high pitched whine from damage to your inner ear. It is generally reversible by abstaining from more ASA for a time. So there is that warning sign for some people (but maybe not for you and maybe not all the time so don't rely on it).

Aspirin washed down with a cup of coffee is as effective as any of the fancy brand name compounds in treating migraine and the aches and pains of daily living. Caffeine definitely potentiates the analgesic effect of aspirin, while also acting directly on the blood vessels that cause migraine pain. Plain coffee is the preferred way of delivering the caffeine, since it contains a number of other drugs that also have some benefit, and because a warm solution more quickly gets into the blood stream than a cold one laden with sugar, etc. This statement is true when the possible benefits of a placebo reaction to a given brand name drug are discounted--- but we have already destroyed that placebo effect for you with this post, eh?

Bayer aspirin is generally priced twice as much, or more, than just plain aspirin, but is no different from any of the rest once it is out of the bottle. Still if you want to enhance your pain relief with a bit of placebo effect, Bayer might well work better for you than the cheap generic stuff.

Comment Re:The two seem very related... (Score 2) 281

I won't provide an example, but it is fully possible to be honest and considerate at the same time, for example, just like it is possible to express even severe anger and dissatisfaction without shouting or getting into a fight.

Language is communication, you may think you're expressing it but does the recipient comprehend it? I've met the kind of people that seem to think if you're not shouting and cursing at them, you're not really angry. It's like they just hear "blahblahblah" but if you were really angry you wouldn't be calm and collected, so evidently you're not. There's no doubt that some people not only bubble wrap it but shy away from the truth in their quest to be considerate. See the Florence Foster Jenkins movie, she could have used some honest feedback before she booked Carnegie Hall...

Comment Re:Explore the ocean depths (Score 1) 99

The dream of space exploration & colonization is that it's a stepping stone towards other worlds and a vast spread of humanity across the galaxy. Not simply a one-time deal that adds a new region of Earth for humans to live in, but at great expense & difficulty.

Earth to Mars (shortest): 56,000,000 km
Earth to nearest star after the Sun: 40,000,000,000,000 km

I think you need to make the same kind of leap as going from horse and carriage to the Saturn V to go from interplanetary to interstellar. Sure keeping people alive is an interesting challenge, but somehow I don't think generation ships that take ~70000 years is the solution. For that we need a revolution in propulsion technology that we're not going to get from Falcon Heavy, SLS or even Musk's ITS. A bit like if I wanted to lift 100kg, I could do that with exercise but none of those plans or experience really bring me closer to lifting 10000kg.

Comment Re:Only a fraction of US munitions... (Score 1) 199

In this case, their grievance is that we exist. ISIS wants a new caliphate to control the entire Middle East and they want to pursue holy war, you can't really negotiate around either of those even if they wanted to.

I think you misspelled "the world", basically their strategy is to generate so much resentment towards Muslims (you know, 1.6 billion people - bigger than declaring war on China) that they get two new recruits for every one that's killed. The only reason it's not working is that so far we haven't taken the bait. We grieve for the dead, increase the military effort but we don't lash out in revenge. I sorta expected some militant nutters to go postal in a mosque or to burn them to the ground but apart from a lot of very vivid commentary there's been very few actual attacks on Muslims in general. If we were as short-tempered as they are like going ballistic over drawings we'd be in WW3 by now.

Comment Re:It's about landmass (Score 1) 466

If you regularly need to travel 2-3 hours away from home, the time loss from long mid-trip recharges is not small.

True. But unless it's their day job, how many regularly spend that much time in a car anyway? If you're working eight hours a day - low for the US, I hear - and sleep eight hours you've go no life left with that commute. On the weekend I suppose if you have close relatives or a cabin that's just in the sweet spot it could be a regular thing, but if it's two-three hours one way and you're staying can get destination charging. Or not if it's a remote cabin, but then EVs aren't for you. Don't get me wrong, I've driven much longer but those were hardly trips I'd make every week or every month. If you divide number of cars by number of miles driven it seems to me a lot of cars don't actually go very far.

Comment Re:One can hope (Score 1) 124

I like Red Hat and I appreciate all they've done for open-source in the enterprise, but the desktopification of core Linux aspects is a bad thing.

Uh you realize Red Hat only has one little side project for workstations and it's essentially the server version with a GUI and a cheaper license? Fedora is just their testbed, they don't care about the desktop. For me it's pretty clear that the core feature of systemd is resource management for containers and other forms of light virtualization. If you run a dedicated server, you don't need it. If you use a hypervisor and full VMs you don't need it. If you want to "app-ify" your servers with Docker then systemd is the management tool around it. It's a huge selling point to cloud providers which is core business for Red Hat. They're not doing it to compete with Linux Mint...

Comment Re: He cheated OTHER players (Score 4, Insightful) 404

The players cheated.

They did not mark any cards, they noticed a flaw that could be used as a mark. No rule of the casino was broken, they're nullifying it because state law says the presence of marked cards means the game is not lawfully played and thus void regardless of whose fault that is. But this means that all games played with this deck should be declared void, every win and every loss. Otherwise you're saying the casino can write the values on the back of the card, they win it was a fair game but you win and they call foul. So I'm actually with Ivey on this one, he's played with the same deck under the same rules as other players but they're cancelling just his games because he won. That's not a legally sound reasoning.

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