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Comment interesting... (Score 1) 68

So what's the copyright on this tool? Can I embed it in the reports I write to spot if my competitors steal them? (they're not using LibreOffice or anything, if they were smart enough for basic security, they wouldn't have to steal my stuff...)

We'll see adaptations of this everywhere in the near future. I know a dozen consulting companies immediately who are afraid that their stuff is stolen by competitors.

Comment Re: It's my house though (Score 1) 120

Interestingly, on the other hand in porn and swinger societies, black men seem to be quite popular. There's probably a mix of the exotic and forbidden at work, as well as the fact that it's generally a safe environment with other people present.

Thanks for the link. I always find it fascinating how complex and full of different aspects a topic becomes once you move beneath the surface and dissect causality.

Comment Re: It's my house though (Score 1) 120

Once you use a listing service that opens it to the public then there are all sorts of rules and laws that follow.

Why? You just state that like it's an obvious fact, but compared to "the sky is blue" it does not immediately follow.

Want to keep your rules? Don't use a listing service.

Why? That I need to follow the rules of the listing service, fine. That's part of signing the EULA when you register with it. But why do these rules have to be/contain specific rules? Why can the listing service not make up whatever rules it wants? It doesn't follow.

Rent to whomever you want, but don't advertise it to people you have no intention of renting to. That is what is illegal.

Ok, so add a filter to the listing service that allows the landlord to say "no men and no asian people" if they want, or "only single mothers of african decent" if that's their preference. What's wrong with that? If you find that nobody wants to rent to group X - go and figure out what's the reason for that and put your energy into fixing that. At the same time, there's suddenly a business opportunity for people to rent specifically to that group. The more they are discriminated against, the less competition and the more interesting it is to rent specifically to them.

Suppressing prejudices doesn't work. They don't go away just because you can't say it. Addressing them in an intelligent way is a much better approach.

Comment Re:It's my house though (Score 1) 120

Oh I love it when Ignoramus Anonymous trouts of free market nonsense.

When is the last time you saw an actual free market? You know, the one with an infinite number of buyers and sellers, perfect transparency, zero handling costs and no barriers of entry?

That's right, the whole free market thing is a purely theoretical model. It is not a real economical theory. It's the economists equivalent to the physicist saying "let's ignore friction and assume a perfect sphere in a vacuum..."

You need to adapt it to the real world or you are in for a hell of a lot surprises.

Comment Re:Observation (Score 1) 120

Because we live in a post-political-correctness world, where you are shouted down as racist, sexist, nazi or whatever if you have a not-approved-by-the-mainstream-police uncomfortable opinion. Some of those opinions actually are some or all of those things, but once people realised that it's an easy way to shut someone up, the labels expanded dramatically. You are now labeled a rape-culture sexist if you point out that "equal rights" also means men have rights. You are labeled a slave-holder racist if you point out that there are cases where discrimination goes against white people. And god forbid you say anything positive about a heterosexual white male.

Sadly, people didn't understand that the reason sexism and racism and political extremism are making a comeback tour is exactly that their proponents are being shouted down, giving them this "rebel" feeling that tends to make people stick more strongly to their opinion instead of changing theirs mind.

We should engage racists and reveal - to their and our eyes - what's behind their thoughts. Most often, it turns out it's a simple mix of stereotypes and fear, and once revealed it can be healed. We don't do it because we are also afraid - that if you seriously engage the topic, you have to face some uncomfortable facts for yourself. For example that certain demographic groups actually are more prone to violence, or more likely to commit certain crimes, or other such things. Dissecting that into the parts that are inherent to whatever the trait is and those that are self-fullfilling prophecies (if everyone thinks group A is full of criminals, they are less likely to be given good jobs, leaving many of them no other option than to become criminals). So in a way, the whole shouting match is because the non-racists are afraid to face an uncomfortable fact or two that might shake their simplified world-view.

For the record: I'm a racist. My Bengal cat is different from other cat races and I won't let anyone tell me that she's the same as any street cat.
For humans, even the term is silly as there is only one human race. We extinguished the other ones (Neanderthals and such) tens of thousands of years ago.

Comment Tricky one this is (Score 1) 120

Wow, that's going to clash.

On the one hand, yes racism is stupid and backwater countryside last-century silly.
But on the other hand, this isn't some hotel room, this is, for many people, theirs home (or holiday home, or whatever). They should be able to decide who to let in, based on whatever criteria they want, including racism, sexism and I-don't-like-people-in-suits.

We will see these kind of things happening more and more as the "gig economy" blurs the line between the private and the business world.

Comment Re:Literally in the Summary (Score 1) 261

There is an expectation that the parent will return.

No. That they are required to take them back doesn't lead to the conclusion that they expect the return. Most maternity-fill I see is by temp-to-hire. They expect to fill the position permanently, but have to be able to clear it out, if the employee returns.

Your premise is that employers are dumb. They know the employees don't return. They plan on the employees returning. That's dumb.

Comment Re:Literally in the Summary (Score 1) 261

It's a form of "terminal leave". You have leave due you. You take it, then don't come back. That's how organizations like the US military pay out leave owed, rather than the lump-sum most private corporations do. There's nothing "unethical" in taking a leave you've earned. The few places I've seen it offered, you had to have been there a few years to earn that perk. Why hand the employer a handout? Take your leave payout as terminal leave. Then leave.

The only thing "dishonest" is the employers who wouldn't pay it if you told them you weren't coming back. The dishonest employers drive the employees to lie.

Comment Re:Bleep this (Score 2) 33

(Fucking salt lamps, really? I knew people were stupid, but come on)

One of my neighbors got a salt lamp for Christmas and put it on the curb for garbage pickup by New Year's Eve. I saw it when I was walking the dog and snatched it up. I was hoping to wrap it again and re-gift it to someone as a gag, but my wife saw it and plugged it in. Now it sits as a night light on the counter in the hallway going to the bathroom. True story.

I don't know about any health benefits, but it is strangely attractive. A light bulb inside a lump of salt. Who would've thunk it?

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