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Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 306

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 240

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment eBay just as bad (Score 1) 190

I purchased a genuine 12w apple charger from an Australian eBay seller. It failed within a week. I pulled it apart and it was clearly a Chinese knockoff. The creepage between primary and secondary was almost non existent. I told the seller and they were 'shocked'. I pulled apart the replacement they sent, and it too was a knockoff, albeit with better creepage. I told the supplier they needed to take down their Ad as they had sold over 300 of these things. Well after many back and forth emails, they start getting abusive. They just couldn't comprehend that that had broken Australian electrical safety laws, consumer seller laws and violated apples copyright.

The sad thing is, as I did more research, I find out: eBay doesn't give a toss; unless someone has died, the government regulators don't give a toss. So I reported them to Apple,but to be honest, I don't think Apple care that much either.
So this means, if you really want a genuine charger that won't kill anyone, you need pay the Apple tax.

Comment France France (Score 1) 333

There, I have now doubled the number of times "France" appears in the discussion. (It was twice when I posted).

That's normal. You see these giant arguments go on and on about whether it is economically feasible or safe or whatever, and not only do detractors fail to address the nation that's been getting most power from it for 40 years without accidents, contamination, public protests of note, and affordably enough....the weird thing is the promoters hardly mention it, either.

France. Triple.

Comment Re:Not a minicomputer (Score 1) 40

More the size of a large fridge. A small modern fridge is about the size of a PC. Towards the very end of the mini-computer era, DEC did produce some that kind of size, but your typical mini-computer occupied one to four cabinets, each about 4' or 6' tall.

The first popular minicomputer, the PDP/8, was not that big - about 6U size, I'd guess?
Of course, to be useful, you would normally combine it with a couple of side-by-side upright expansion chassies stacked on top, like for tape drive and IO, which would triple or quadruple the height.

Comment New Brain Interface (Score 1) 307

Well, who needs USB when the device will soon be revealed to have an internal brain interface chip.

Of course, you will need a chip implanted in your own skull to connect. And, incidentally, it will only connect to Apple and also, for medical reasons, it will be impossible to install anybody else's brain interface chips, meaning you will then be committed to Apple for life, and only Apple.

This will not constitute a significant negative to their hardcore base.


BBC Micro Bit Mini-Computer To Expand Internationally With New Hardware ( 40

An anonymous reader quotes a report from BBC: The Micro Bit mini-computer is to be sold across the world and enthusiasts are to be offered blueprints showing how to build their own versions. The announcements were made by a new non-profit foundation that is taking over the educational project, formerly led by the BBC. About one million of the devices were given away free to UK-based schoolchildren earlier this year. Beyond the UK, Micro Bits are also in use in schools across the Netherlands and Iceland. But the foundation now intended to co-ordinate a wider rollout. "Our goal is to go out and reach 100 million people with Micro Bit, and by reach I mean affect their lives with the technology," said the foundations' new chief executive Zach Shelby. "That means [selling] tens of millions of devices... over the next five to 10 years." His organization plans to ensure Micro Bits can be bought across Europe before the end of the year and is developing Norwegian and Dutch-language versions of its coding web tools to boost demand. Next, in 2017, the foundation plans to target North America and China, which will coincide with an upgrade to the hardware. TrixX adds: The makers of the BBC micro:bit have announced that they are releasing the full specs for the device under an open license, (SolderPad License, similar to Apache License but for hardware). This means that anyone can legally use the specs and build their own device, or fork the reference design GitHub repo and design their derivatives.
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Journal Journal: Agorophobia 2

“Say, Ed! How was your trip? Lager?”
“Hi, John. Yeah, I’ll have a lager. The whole trip was lousy, a journey through hell all the way.”
“Didn't you fly Green-Osbourne?”
“Well, yeah.”
The bartender swore; he was a wealthy man who owned the bar he was tending and quite a bit of Green-Osbourne Transportation

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