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Comment Re:Wish they'd looked into this sooner (Score 1) 75

I listened to Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Motorhead and pretty much anything loud. Including concerts. And I play electric guitar.
Yet I lie awake at night because a neighbor snores, or the aquarium fish flips its fin at the other side of the house, or the blood coursing through my veins, or the hum of a lamp, or even cats walking across the carpet in the room above mine.
If anything, listening to so much loud music has made me overly sensitive, and I have to sleep with ear plugs. Not that it helps when the birds start chirping outside early in the morning.

Comment Re:Good start (Score 1) 276

Please describe this arena that code competes in and the rules of said competition. I don't recall any job I've done where we created more than one chunk of code to perform the same task and set them into competition.

Others create code that your code competes with. Unless you've cornered the market, you are always in a deadly competition, whether you realize it or not.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 1) 276

Since the ability to pursue happiness isn't mentioned at all in the Constitution, I think it's pretty safe to say that it's irrelevant to federal issues.

It is part of the Declaration of Independence, without which the Constitution has no base and is null and void.

Comment Re:Good start (Score 1) 276

When I refactor code it's similar to reorganizing a warehouse. This is not evolution. It's simple management.

The evolutionary aspect is what happens after you refactor your code. It tallies the score on whether you made good or bad decisions. Spend too much time on something that doesn't give your code a competitive advantage, and it fails when competing.
Understanding evolution doesn't mean direct evolution. That's a big clue that you don't understand evolution.
Understanding how evolution works is by always keeping in mind that the least fit are culled, and how to reduce the risks of it being you. You don't have to be best; you just have to not be worse than the competition in any aspect that could cause a survival advantage for them over you.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 1) 276

A federal system relies on the assumption that the federal government is smart enough to know what's best for everyone

No, it only relies on the assumption that the federal government is smarter than the dumbest state government in order to raise the floor.

Comment Re:Mandate reporting when antibiotics are prescrib (Score 1) 75

Yes. But we need to be aware that man is not the only source of antibiotics. They naturally occur. We get a good lot of them from plants and bacteria, starting of course with penicilin which we got from mold, and which was already present on salted food and damp environments. What we did was to make antibiotics present in organisms other than their natural sources.

Comment Re:Let's Face It (Score 1) 276

That's funny, I'm using a touch keyboard now, and I can still spell correctly.

Not at any appreciable speed, I am fairly certain. Touch typing is fast, while swiping is slow. So slow that auto-completion becomes an important and integral part of swiping.

Some companies tried that with word processing for touch typists too (long before swiping was invented), and almost all typists turned it off. With touch typing, you could finish a word much quicker than it took to look at the suggestion and accept it.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 1) 276

Since education isn't mentioned at all in the Constitution, I think it's pretty safe to say that the 10th means it's not something the Feds have any business doing....

Anything that directly affects an individuals ability to pursue happiness is very much a federal issue.

Comment Re:Good start (Score 2) 276

In very few fields, even science and technology, is an accurate understanding of evolution even remotely helpful.

Au contraire, an understanding of evolution gives a strong advantage in pretty much any field. Whether it's programming or economics, understanding how successful models gain a survival advantage, while the weakest are more subject to predation is more than remotely helpful.
Competition and death is inevitable, and you become more successful by embracing it than fighting or ignoring it.

When deciding what programmers do, evolution plays a part on a daily basis. You want to refactor code? Unless something is detrimental, leave it in. You have two different ways of doing things? Use both if you can, and let time decide which one is best; you may be surprised that it's not always the fastest or most elegant code. You have some spare time? Have individuals compete instead of collaborate. Let the worst projects fail - don't spend a major effort rescuing them.

Similar for any other science. Use your knowledge of evolution. It is a scorekeeper and happens whether you like it or not. So use it to your advantage. Embrace the principles; don't fight them.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 4, Interesting) 276

These sorts of programs should not be Federal.

Now I'd like to hear some logic behind that claim.

I can only see detriments. When states pick, the result will differ between them. That leads to unequal opportunities depending on where you were born, and as many gaps between haves and have-nots that divide further as gaps that close. Or more, because there seems to be a strong correlation between the overall poverty of a state and how reluctant it is to support science.

Now if there were evolution for states, I'd be all for it. Every year, force a random poor state to dissolve and be amalgamated with its neighbors, and a random rich state to split in two. Then, doing the right thing would be rewarded by survival over time.
But alas, the competition isn't between the states, which survive no matter what, but between humans, who too often lose because of their state not giving them as good opportunities as other states.

Comment Everything Old is New Again (Score 2) 75

The Andromeda Strain was published in 1969.

The United States has some disease reporting, it started at least 75 years ago before the antibiotic bubble. This CDC Report summarizes the present state of disease reporting, in two pages. We need higher standards of reporting and legal penalties for failure to report.

Comment Re:Kind of obvious... (Score 1) 273

I'm a 3D modeler, I've been working with 3D for over 20 years. I've YET to see a useful home-model that isn't just "look - I - printed - a - stock - model - ma!" tech demo. You'll actually be better off with a good CNC machine if you want to make prototypes on the cheap.

We are an electronics company who have a makerbot and a big ass CNC mill (and some manual lathes).The makerbot gets used a couple of times a week by engineers making jigs, or prototypes for form fit and sometimes function. The CNC mill rarely gets used, as it takes a lot more skill and effort to use.
So while I find the concept was overhyped for consumer use, it does find niche uses in businesses that actually need to design and make stuff.

Submission + - How to View the SpaceX Falcon 9 Return to Flight at Vandenberg Air Force Base (perens.com)

Bruce Perens writes: Silicon Valley folks should, sometime, take the opportunity to view a launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Lompoc is 4-5 hours from the Bay, 2.5 hours from LA if there's ever no traffic. An upcoming SpaceX launch is notable because it's their return to flight, months after their last attempt blew up on the pad during a pre-launch test. Read how to view the launch.

Comment Re: Less politics (Score 1) 110

Eich resigned because of external pressure on the Mozilla organization. I hear that one of the lobbying activities against him was when the dating site "OK Cupid" started informing Firefox users who accessed the site of Eich's activities and that they should download a browser made by people who don't nominate someone with gender discrimination issues to be their CEO. At the time, 8% of OK Cupid customers were there to arrange same-gender meetings.

They felt he was the public face of the company.

Russ Nelson published a piece on what he theorized was the economic motivation of Blacks to be lazy, and was booted off of the Open Source Initiative board. He wasn't thinking about how it would be perceived. A modified version of the piece is still online, but not the version that got him in trouble. In general, executives are seen as the public faces of their organizations even in the case of Nelson, who was not the chairman of the board, but was simply a member of the executive board. In Nelson's case, it wasn't that he made publicity appearances and press releases, it was that he was one of the people with the power to direct the company (and thus a more real face of the company than soneone who just does PR), and folks did not trust that someone who wrote what he did would behave as they would like in that position.

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