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Comment Re:Free time (Score 1) 211

While there was certainly some lying to kids going on here, it was no secret that you won't get a job with a Grievance Studies degree. People who chose a worthless degree to pursue did indeed bring their problems on themselves.

For the rest, it will keep getting worse until the Tuition Bubble pops. With a STEM degree there will be a job eventually, but college debt has gotten out of hand.

Comment Huh? (Score 4, Interesting) 192

"A century ago, there would be a battle that wiped out the next village, you'd never even hear about it."

Huh? Maybe in the remote parts of Africa or some other place that was still stuck in the stone age. Maybe. In the parts of the worlds actually living in the (early) 20th century not so much.

""We're only crowded because we've crowded ourselves into cities. Try taking a train trip across the United States, or Europe or Asia or anywhere in the world. Ninety-nine percent of the land is not used... we don't want to use it because you don't want to be out in the boondocks if you don't have people to work and play with. That's already changing now that we have some level of virtual communication..."

Not in the US, or most of Europe, or a good chunk of Asia. Not used for housing or urban sprawl isn't the same as not used. And no, it's actually changing much - communication isn't the only issue, access to stuff (physical goods) is also important, as is access to experiences. And neither have markedly changed if you live in the actual boondocks. (I find most people who live in big cities have little idea what conditions are like outside of the metro area.)

When will computer geeks grasp that most of the human race actually enjoys the company of others and that there are actual economic reasons why people cluster?

Comment Communism. Right. (Score 1) 499

Because communism has succeeded SO admirably thus far.

But no. Every idiot out there thinks they have the right recipe for successful communism.

WAKE THE FUCK UP!

Communism is a perfect form of government. For social insects.

With any hint of self interest (enlightened or otherwise), and the system eventually breaks down. And it usually fucks up the lives of a lot of people on the way down.

Comment This is why you bring your A-game to the table. (Score 1) 63

I've seen it before. Companies that would be willing to drop millions (or billions) turned away. Simply because they attempted to lowball their first bid.

Also, they fail to communicate that this is a preliminary offer, and that if it's not acceptable, there's lots of room for negotiation.

As such, valuable prizes walk away from them.

Comment Re:Emissions fix? Call me skeptical... (Score 1) 64

I'd love to see an independent, third-party certification that there isn't discernible loss in MPG or power.

Heck, I fully expected that. See, I thought VW would release a firmware patch for emission testing equipment. All VWs would start passing, no need to bother the owners with coming in for the recall.

Comment Re:Code should be as concise as possible. (Score 1) 234

One-letter variable names alone provide far too little job security, except for l and o. This is much better code:

for (godzilla=pokemon, godzilla+=l; godzilla<jesus)
    lllillilil = llliliilil + llillilill;

Did you think I was adding one to godzilla in the for clause? You're not worthy to maintain my code. Seriously, I got stuck maintaining a code base where some genius used l as a variable name everywhere - he now works for Microsoft Research (not making that up).

Comment Re:The title is misleading (Score 1) 149

Personally, I think those detectors are very likely to be a waste of time. We're just building what are basically better neutrino detectors, not because there's any reason to think dark matter will interact with them, but because it's a detector we know how to build!

I guess partly it's a case of whether dark matter is "massive particles that interact via the weak force" or "massive particles that interact weakly" (via some other force) - if it's the latter, these detectors aren't likely to work.

There are lots of theories about what the "WIMPs" really are - there's no evidence of weak force interaction, it only sets an upper limit on their interaction cross-section. Heck, even that's only true if dark matter was found in equal amounts of matter and anti-matter in the early universe, which is a heck of an assumption since we don't understand why familiar matter had such a matter/anti-matter imbalance early on. If dark matter had the same imbalance, then far more possibilities open up, as long as it doesn't interact with light (or I guess the strong force, as these detectors should really have worked in that case).

Comment Re:String theory is just that: a theory (Score 3, Informative) 149

But we just proved it doesn't exist.

No, that's not what TFA says at all. You can't even blame a misleading Slashdot headline here: you just made that up. A detector was built to find a very specific kind of matter. It didn't find anything. No real surprise, as there was never any reason to think it would - it was just the sort of detector we already knew how to build.

Hence, my theory is just as valid, that EM has both mass and is a wave

Yes, that's called "Quantum Field Theory", and it's what nearly everyone believes. Doesn't explain anything that dark matter explains, though, so no.

Comment Re:Great news everyone (Score 5, Interesting) 149

No, it is more than that. Astrophysicists give the attribute of "gravity" to dark matter. In fact, that was the reason they promulgated the idea, i.e., galaxies would fly apart otherwise so there must be something we cannot see which supplies the extra gravity.

They do not entertain the idea that maybe their laws are wrong, or that some other phenomenon might be affecting gravity.

That was true quite a few years ago, when there were many theories for galactic rotation rates, including MOND (precisely "the idea that maybe their laws are wrong"), hot dark matter, and cold dark matter which might be WIMPs or MACHOs.

Then we got more data.

WIMPs won out because they also explain gravitational lensing and the early universe. The cosmic microwave background radiation observations were decisive. The predictions made WIMPs were right on the money - turns out the early universe had just the predicted amount of (a) matter, that (b) wasn't moving near the speed of light, and (c) before block holes, brown dwarfs, etc could have formed.

That's how science works. Scientists do not lack creativity - there was a whole forest of ideas to explain galactic rotation rates. But as more observations of unrelated phenomena come it, only "some sort of particle" was left standing. Falsifiable theories were falsified.

This experiment was a bit silly IMO - it was just a detector much like the detectors we built for neutrinos, which had never shown any signs of dark matter before. It was very much a case of "well, we know how to build this sort of detector already, so let just build a big one and hope for the best".

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