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Submission + - Sony Unlocks PlayStation 4's Previously Reserved Seventh CPU Core For Devs (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Toward the beginning of the year, it was revealed that Microsoft was going to "unlock" the seventh core on the Xbox One's processor, enabling developers to eke just a bit more performance out of the console and offer more flexibility at resource utilization. It appears that Microsoft's move would inevitably be followed by Sony, as reports are now coming in that this will be made available on the PlayStation 4 as well. This subtle change was highlighted in the latest changelog for the FMOD sound engine which is labeled as a "LowLevel API." While the unlocked core could take on FMOD duties if developers want it to, it's now not going to be tied to any single purpose. Developers could make use of this core, for example, to boost AI performance, or any other process that has a heavy computation requirement. It could also be used to simply help ease overall system load.
Linux

Submission + - PS3 Jailbreak now legal in Spain (nicagamerz.com)

deek writes: Spanish gamer site NicaGamerz.com have reported that it's now legal to sell the PS3 Jailbreak modchip in Spain (Google translation). According to the article, one reason for the legal ruling is because Sony removed the ability to run GNU/Linux on the console. One can only wonder if Sony will soon rush out a firmware update that will re-enable the OtherOS feature, and appeal the court decision. Oh the irony of that thought ...

The legal ruling was made on the 13th December (Google translation). There are only 5 days to appeal, starting from that date.

The Courts

Submission + - Landmark ruling gives Australian ISPs safe harbor (itnews.com.au)

omnibit writes: Today, the Federal Court of Australia handed down its ruling in favor of the country's third largest ISP, iiNet. The case was backed by some of the largest media companies, including 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros. They accused iiNet of approving piracy by ignoring thousands of infringement notices. Justice Cowdroy said that the "mere provision of access to internet is not the means to infringement" and "[c]opyright infringement occured as result of use of BitTorrent, not the Internet...iiNet has no control over BitTorrent system and [is] not responsible for BitTorrent system." Many internet providers had been concerned that an adverse ruling would have forced themselves to police internet traffic and comply with the demands of copyright owners without any legislative or judicial oversight.

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