Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Submission + - AMD Unveils Radeon Pro WX And Pro SSG Professional Graphics Cards (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: AMD took the wraps off its latest pro graphics solutions at Siggraph today, and announced three new professional graphics cards in the new Polaris-based Radeon Pro WX Series. The Radeon Pro WX 4100 is the entry-level model with a half-height design for use in small form-factor workstations. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 is the middle child, while the Radeon Pro WX 7100 is AMD's current top-end WX model. The Radeon Pro WX 7100 has 32 compute units, offers 5 TFLOPs of compute performance, and is backed by 8GB of GDDR4 memory over a 256-bit memory interface. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 offers 28 compute units and 4 TFLOPs of performance along with 8GB memory over the same 256-bit interface and the Radeon Pro WX 4100 is comprised of 16 compute units at 2 TFLOPs of perf with 4GB memory over a 128-bit memory link. The Radeon Pro WX 4100 has four mini DisplayPort outputs, while the Radeon Pro WX 5100 and 7100 each have four full-size DisplayPort connectors. None of these cards will be giving the new NVIDIA Quadro P6000 a run for its money in terms of performance, but they don't have to. The Quadro card will no doubt costs thousands of dollars, while the Radeon Pro WX 7100 will eek in at just under $1,000. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 and 4100 will slot in somewhat below that mark. AMD also announced the Radeon Solid State Storage Architecture and the Radeon Pro SSG card today. Details are scant, but AMD is essentially outfitting Radeon Pro SSG cards with large amounts of Solid State Flash Memory, which can allow much larger data sets to reside close to the GPU in an extended frame buffer. Whereas the highest-end professional graphics cards today may have up to 24GB of memory, the Radeon Pro SSG will start with 1TB, linked to the GPU via a custom PCI Express interface. Giving the GPU access to a large, local data repository should offer significantly increased performance for demanding workloads like real-time post-production of 8K video, high-resolution rendering, VR content creation and others.

Submission + - NVIDIA Unveils Quadro P6000 With 24GB GDDR5X, 3840 Cores, Beefier Than Titan X (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: NVIDIA Stepped out at Siggraph today and announced yet another monster GPU, this time for the professional graphics market. The Quadro P6000 is even a step beyond the recently announced Titan X, with 3840 CUDA cores and 12 TFLOPs of compute power at its disposal. You won't find next-generation High Bandwidth Memory here (aka HBM2) like the P100, but the professional graphics card does pack in a healthy 24GB of 10GHz GDDR5X memory. The card is also equipped with four DisplayPort 1.4 ports and one DVI connector and can support up to four displays at 4092x2160 @ 120Hz or four displays at 5120x2880 @ 60Hz. In addition to the new 16nm Pascal-based Quadro cards, NVIDIA also announced that it is extending its VRWorks SDK to include the acceleration of 360-degree video stitching. Additional capabilities are coming to NVIDIA's DGX-1 server as well.

Submission + - Bitcoin Not Money, Rules Miami Judge In Dismissing Laundering Charges (miamiherald.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Bitcoin does not actually qualify as money, a Miami-Dade judge ruled Monday in throwing out criminal charges against a Miami Beach man charged with illegally selling the virtual currency. The defendant, Michell Espinoza, was charged with illegally selling and laundering $1,500 worth of Bitcoins to undercover detectives who told him they wanted to use the money to buy stolen credit-card numbers. But Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Teresa Mary Pooler ruled that Bitcoin was not backed by any government or bank, and was not “tangible wealth” and “cannot be hidden under a mattress like cash and gold bars.” “The court is not an expert in economics, however, it is very clear, even to someone with limited knowledge in the area, the Bitcoin has a long way to go before it the equivalent of money,” Pooler wrote in an eight-page order. The judge also wrote that Florida law – which says someone can be charged with money laundering if they engage in a financial transaction that will “promote” illegal activity – is way too vague to apply to Bitcoin. “This court is unwilling to punish a man for selling his property to another, when his actions fall under a statute that is so vaguely written that even legal professionals have difficulty finding a singular meaning,” she wrote.

Submission + - MIT Made a Movie Screen That Brings Glasses-Free 3D To All Seats (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: MIT has developed a glasses-less 3D display for movie theaters. The Nintendo 3DS is one of a handful of devices to feature glasses-less 3D, but it is designed for a single users where the user is looking at the display head-on at a relatively specific angle. It's not something made for a movie theater with hundreds of seats, each of which would have a different viewing angle. What's neat about MIT's 3D display is that it doesn't require glasses and it lets anyone see the 3D effect in a movie theater, no matter where they are sitting. The MIT Computers Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) created the prototype display called 'Cinema 3D' that uses a complex arrangement of lenses and mirrors to create a set number of parallax barriers that can address every viewing angle in the theater based on seat locations. It works in a movie theater because the seats are in fixed locations, and people don't tend to move around, change seats or alter their viewing angle too much. What's also neat about the Cinema 3D is that is preserves resolution, whereas other glasses-less 3D displays carry cots in terms of image resolution. The prototype is about the size of a letter-sized notepad, and it needs 50 sets of mirrors and lenses. It should be ready for market once researchers scale it up to a commercially viable product.

Submission + - NVIDIA Drops Surprise Unveiling Of Pascal-Based GeForce GTX Titan X (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Details just emerged from NVIDIA regarding its upcoming powerful, Pascal-based Titan X graphics card, featuring a 12 billion transistor GPU, codenamed GP102. NVIDIA is obviously having a little fun with this one and at an artificial intelligence (AI) meet-up at Stanford University this evening, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang first announced, and then actually gave away a few brand new, Pascal-based NVIDIA TITAN X GPUs. Apparently, Brian Kelleher, one of NVIDIA's top hardware engineers, made a bet with NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang, that the company could squeeze 10 teraflops of computing performance out of a single chip. Jen-Hsun thought that was not doable in this generation of product, but apparently, Brian and his team pulled it off. The new Titan X is powered by NVIDIA's largest GPU; the company says it's actually the biggest GPU ever built. The Pascal-based GP102 features 3,584 CUDA cores, clocked at 1.53GHz (the previous-gen Titan X has 3,072 CUDA cores clocked at 1.08GHz). The specifications NVIDIA has released thus far include: 12-billion transistors, 11 TFLOPs FP32 (32-bit floating point), 44 TOPS INT8 (new deep learning inferencing instructions), 3,584 CUDA cores at 1.53GHz, and 12GB of GDDR5X memory (480GB/s). The new Titan X will be available Aug. 2 for $1,200 direct from NVIDIA.com.

Submission + - Lenovo And Motorola Launch Moto Z And Moto Z Force Droids With Moto Mods (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Lenovo and Motorola launched the Moto Z Droid, Moto Z Force Droid and their companion snap-on Moto Mods today, which are a new series of Android smartphone devices that offer something unique among other Android smartphones. The base specs of both the Moto Z Droid and Moto Z Force Droid read like a top-shelf Android device should, with Qualcomm's latest Snapdragon 820 SoC and a healthy 4GB of RAM and 32GB or 64GB storage options, along with microSD card expansion up to another 2TB. Both Moto Z Droids have essentially the same base platform, but differ significantly in a couple of areas. The Moto Z Droid is a thin (5.19mm) variant with a 2600 mAh battery and a 2560X1440 QHD AMOLED display. The Moto Z Force Droid sports that same QHD display, but it is sheathed behind Moto ShatterShield technology making it virtually indestructible. Motorola guarantees it not to crack or shatter if dropped. ShatterShield, along with the phone's larger 3500 mAh battery, make the Moto Z a somewhat thicker device. However, what's truly standout are Moto Mods, which are snap-on back-packs of sorts that add new features, like the JBL Speaker, Moto Insta-Projector and Incipio OffGrid Power Pack (2220 mAh) mods. Integration of the mods is excellent through Moto's patented rear magnetic and pin connector technology. Even the fairly complex projector mod fires up in seconds and works really well.

Submission + - NVIDIA Launches GeForce GTX 1060 To Take On AMD's Radeon RX 480 (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: NVIDIA just launched their answer to AMD's Radeon RX 480 mainstream card today, dubbed the GeForce GTX 1060. The GP106 GPU at the heart of the GeForce GTX 1060 has roughly half of the resources of NVIDIA's current flagship GeForce GTX 1080. NVIDIA claims the GTX 1060 performs on par with a previous generation high-end GeForce GTX 980 and indeed this 120W mainstream offers an interesting mix of low-power and high-performance. The new GeForce GTX 1060 features a new Pascal derivative GPU that's somewhat smaller, called the GP106. The GP106 features 10 streaming multiprocessors (SM) with a total of 1280, single-precision CUDA cores and eight texture units. The GeForce GTX 1060 also features six 32-bit memory controllers, for 192-bits in total. GeForce GTX 1060 cards with either 6GB or 3GB of GDDR5 memory will be available and in benchmark testing offered performance that just misses the mark set by the pricier AMD Radeon R9 Nano but often outran the 8GB Radeon RX 480. The GeForce GTX 1060 held onto its largest leads over the Radeon RX 480 in the DirectX 11 tests, though the Radeon had a clear edge in OpenCL and managed to pull ahead in Thief and in some DirectX 12 tests (like Hitman). The GeForce GTX 1060, however, consumes significantly less power than the Radeon RX 480 and is quieter too.

Submission + - Leak Shows PlayStation 4 Neo Is Expected To Have Twice The Graphics Horsepower (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Following rumors of a more powerful console in Sony's not-too-distant future, one that will be capable of playing games at a 4K resolution, the Japanese electronics maker last month opted to confirm it is indeed in development. Called PlayStation 4 Neo, the upgraded system will bring better hardware to the console scene to meet the needs of gaming on a television with four times as many pixels as a Full HD 1080p display. What's it going to take to game at 4K in the living room? A leaked internal document outlines some very interesting specs of the new model PS4 console. Assuming the leaked document is up to date with Sony's current plans, the PS4 Neo will use the same Jaguar cores as the original PS4, but clocked 500MHz faster, with 8 cores at 2.1GHz (up from 1.6GHz). The more significant upgrade will be the GPU. According to the slide, the PS4 Neo will use an improved version of AMD's GCN compute units (CUs), with twice the number of CUs at 36 instead of 18. They'll also be clocked faster—911MHz versus 800MHz. The net result is a 2.3x improvement in floating point performance.

Submission + - Nintendo Launches Pint-Sized NES Classic Edition (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Nintendo has just announced its NES Classic Edition console, which is a miniature version of the blockbuster Nintendo Entertainment Center console that debuted in the early 80s. The original NES was the very first introduction to home video gaming for many Americans and holds a tremendous amount of nostalgia. Nintendo is playing up on that nostalgia, as the newly announced NES Classic Edition comes bundled with a single controller and both are dead ringers for the originals, except the system itself is now palm-sized. Nintendo also had the forethought to make the controller compatible with the Wii and Wii U. Simply plug the NES Classic Controller into a Wii Remote and you can use it to play Virtual Console NES games. The NES Classic Edition comes with 30 classic NES games built in so that you can instantly start busting bricks in Super Mario Bros or catch some serious air in Excitebike.

Submission + - Micron Announces 9100 MAX NVMe PCIe Enterprise Solid State Drives (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Micron just launched its new 9100 Series NVMe solid state drives which come in a number of capacities, configurations and form factors. The Micron 9100 PRO series targets read-centric environments, while the 9100 MAX targets mixed workloads. Capacities for the drives range from 800GB on up to 3.2TB, though all of the drives are outfitted with a similar Microsemi 16-core / 16-channel controller and 16nm Micron MLC NAND flash memory. The fastest drives in the series are rated for peak sequential read and write throughput of 3GB/sec and 2GB/sec, respectively. In testing, the drives generally outpace Intel's DC 3700 series drive, but can't catch Intel's higher-end SSD DC P3608 in some read tests, though the Micron drives did outpace Intel's flagship in some write tests and can hit their peak 3GB/sec specified bandwidth number easily.

Submission + - NVIDIA Announces GeForce GTX 1060, Fierce Competition For The Radeon RX 480 (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: In May, NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX 1080. The company followed up on that beastly chip in June with slightly cut down GeForce GTX 1070 and that trickledown effect is now reaching the mainstream market with the arrival of the GeForce GTX 1060. The GeForce GTX 1060 can be seen as a direct response to the AMD Radeon RX 480, which offers a ton of performance at the $200 price point. While still built using a 16nm FinFET process, the GP106 core on the GTX 1060 features 1280 CUDA cores; exactly half that of the GTX 1080. Base clock for the GPU is 1506MHz, while the boost clock is 1708MHz (NVIDIA is quick to point out, however, the GPU core can easily be overclocked to 2GHz+). The GTX 1060 features a 192-bit memory bus and comes with 6GB of GDDR5 memory running at 8Gbps. The card has a single 6-pin power connector and a 120W TDP. NVIDIA claims that the GTX 1060 is on average 15 percent faster than its closest competitor, the Radeon RX 480. The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 will be available starting July 19th from a wide variety of third-party partners including ASUS, EVGA, Gigabyte, MSI and Zotac etc. with a starting price of $249. The NVIDIA-built GeForce GTX 1060 Founder Edition will be available for $299.

Submission + - Microsoft Xbox Project Scorpio Puts Out 6 TFLOPs On Par With Current Gaming PCs (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Microsoft is hoping to usher in a new era in console gaming just over a year from now. While the company is just a month away from launching the Xbox One S refresh in the US, Project Scorpio is the console that really has gamers talking. During E3, Microsoft provided scant details on the console, only cluing us in to the fact that it would support virtual reality, 4K gaming, and push 6 TFLOPs of computing power. Mateusz Tomaszkiewicz, CD Projekt Red's Principal Narrative Designer, had a few things to say about that last bullet point regarding compute performance. If you recall, AMD's newly introduced Radeon RX 480 offers peak performance of 5.8 TFLOPs, which puts it in close proximity of Microsoft's Project Scorpio. But of course, trying to compare consoles to PCs using this stat alone isn't exactly apples to oranges, though Tomaszkiewicz explains, "For sure it [Scorpio] will have better looking games," Tomaszkiewicz said. "If this was available when we were working on Wild Hunt, I would expect similar quality that we have on PC right now or even better maybe."

Submission + - AMD Launches New Radeon RX 480, Benchmark Numbers Are In (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: AMD launched its new Radeon RX 480 graphics card today, based on the company's all new Polaris GPU architecture. The card is powered by the Polaris 10 GPU which is outfitted with 36 Compute Units, with a total of 2,304 shader processors. Reference specifications call for boost and base GPU clocks of 1266 MHz and 1120 MHz, respectively, and either 4 or 8GB of GDDR5 memory over a 256-bit interface. All told, the Radeon RX 480 offers up a total of 5.8 TFLOPs of compute performance with up to 224GB/s of peak memory bandwidth and the card requires only a single 6-pin PCIe power feed. The Radeon RX 480 is only about 9.5" inches long and sports a typical dual-slot form factor. It offers strong performance in its price segment ($199 — $239) as well. In comparison to NVIDIA's more expensive GeForce GTX 970, AMD's Radeon RX 480 fares very well. The Radeon RX 480 also offers roughly 85-95% of the performance of the more expensive previous gen Radeon R9 390 and was able to overtake it with some basic overclocking. The Radeon RX 480's power characteristics were slightly better than the GeForce GTX 970 as well but when you consider the almost two-year old NVIDIA GPU is manufactured using a 28nm process, versus the 14nm FinFET process of Polaris 10, AMD's Radeon RX 480 power characteristics are less impressive.

Submission + - Microsoft Loses Precedent-Setting Unauthorized Windows 10 Upgrade Court Case (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: If you're among the many Windows customers running Windows 7 or Windows 8 that are sick of the Windows 10 nag screens along with unprompted upgrades, you'll be happy to hear that at least one "little guy" has won a battle against Microsoft in court. Teri Goldstein claims that her computer was forced into upgrading to Windows 10 shortly after it became available during the summer of 2015 — all without her authorization. "I had never heard of Windows 10," Goldstein told The Seattle Times. "Nobody ever asked me if I wanted to update." Windows 10 left her computer unstable and prone to frequent crashes. According to Goldstein, her computer became unusable, which is problematic considering that she uses the machine to run a travel agency. So Goldstein decided to do what the majority of other hapless Windows 10 victims were unwilling to do: sue Microsoft. She decided to battle MSFT in court, citing lost wages and the need to purchase a replacement computer. Much to the surprise of Microsoft, Goldstein actually won her case. Goldstein was awarded damages in the amount of $10,000.

Slashdot Top Deals

"All the people are so happy now, their heads are caving in. I'm glad they are a snowman with protective rubber skin" -- They Might Be Giants

Working...