Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Snowden also did something illegal (Score 4, Interesting) 197

Pentagon Papers

New York Times Co. v. United States, 403 U.S. 713 (1971), was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court on the First Amendment. The ruling made it possible for the New York Times and Washington Post newspapers to publish the then-classified Pentagon Papers without risk of government censorship or punishment.

Submission + - 'Calibration error' changes GOP votes to Dem in Illinois (

Okian Warrior writes: Early voting in Illinois got off to a rocky start Monday, as votes being cast for Republican candidates were transformed into votes for Democrats.

Republican state representative candidate Jim Moynihan: “I tried to cast a vote for myself and instead it cast the vote for my opponent,” Moynihan said. “You could imagine my surprise as the same thing happened with a number of races when I tried to vote for a Republican and the machine registered a vote for a Democrat.”

The conservative website Illinois Review reported that “While using a touch screen voting machine in Schaumburg, Moynihan voted for several races on the ballot, only to find that whenever he voted for a Republican candidate, the machine registered the vote for a Democrat in the same race. He notified the election judge at his polling place and demonstrated that it continued to cast a vote for the opposing candidate’s party. Moynihan was eventually allowed to vote for Republican candidates, including his own race.

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 300

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 230

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Submission + - Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking 1

Fudge Factor 3000 writes: Google has recently quietly changed its privacy policy to allow it to associate web tracking, which is supposed to remain anonymous, with personally identifiable user data:

This completely reneges its promise to keep a wall between ad tracking and personally identifiable user data, further eroding one's anonymity on the internet. Google's priorities are clear. All they care about is monetizing user information to rake in the big dollars from ad revenue.

Think twice before you purchase the premium priced Google Pixel. Google is getting added value from you as its product without giving you part of the revenue it is generating through tracking through lower prices.

Comment eBay just as bad (Score 1) 190

I purchased a genuine 12w apple charger from an Australian eBay seller. It failed within a week. I pulled it apart and it was clearly a Chinese knockoff. The creepage between primary and secondary was almost non existent. I told the seller and they were 'shocked'. I pulled apart the replacement they sent, and it too was a knockoff, albeit with better creepage. I told the supplier they needed to take down their Ad as they had sold over 300 of these things. Well after many back and forth emails, they start getting abusive. They just couldn't comprehend that that had broken Australian electrical safety laws, consumer seller laws and violated apples copyright.

The sad thing is, as I did more research, I find out: eBay doesn't give a toss; unless someone has died, the government regulators don't give a toss. So I reported them to Apple,but to be honest, I don't think Apple care that much either.
So this means, if you really want a genuine charger that won't kill anyone, you need pay the Apple tax.

Comment Re:Twitter Down (Score 3, Interesting) 260

"But if Google+ went down would anybody notice :D"

Some, who value more enlightened discussions, or resent the FB data grabs, and the FB way of ignoring your preference to see what has happened in your sphere most recently and instead try to force feed you what THEY think is most relevant.

Relevance being defined by THEM, to THEIR purposes.

G+ isn't big. That's not even the best thing about it. You, however, I doubt have even actually used it beyond a single visit and thinking 'wow, there's no one here'. You were not missed.

Slashdot Top Deals

I am a computer. I am dumber than any human and smarter than any administrator.