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Comment Re: Overboard, Sad! (Score 2) 159

Guns and shootings are also highly preventable. Problem is Americans don't want to grow up and admit the more guns the public has the more gun violence occurs...

All SORTS of violent crime is highly preventable. Far more people are killed every year, for example, using pipes and clubs or other objects than are killed using "assault" rifles or ANY sort of rifle, shotgun, or other long gun. More people are killed with BARE HANDS than are killed by someone using any kind of long gun.

In fact, one of the most common ways to PREVENT someone from being violently killed by an attacker is: pointing a gun at the attacker. Defensive brandishing (and much less often, actualy shooting) of guns - usually handguns - happens hundreds of thousands of times a year. In places where people are allowed to carry, violent crime GOES DOWN. The "more legally owned and used guns equals more crime" meme is demonstrably false.

Comment Re: Rockets are too expensive (Score 1) 330

You are confusing two different coordinate systems. Both can be true at the same time -- corkscrews and figure 8 -- but not in the same coordinate system.

Looked at from the outside, in the so-called "Galilean frame", you would see the satellite making corkscrews. Another observer on the surface of the earth would see the satellite tracing a figure 8, in his coordinate system.

Since your two coordinate systems are rotating with respect to each other, the parametric equation of motion looks very different. A fixed point in one necessarily traces some kind of spiral in the other.

Comment Re: Rockets are too expensive (Score 1) 330

I think we were thrown off point by AC, who doesn't seem to grasp that physical systems can be described in alternative reference frames.

I think he is trying to say that there is no such thing as a geostationary orbit, because satellites in that orbit are actually tracing out a circular (or even more pedantically, spiral) path.

I believe the responder was trying to point out, using the example of a rocket ship travelling to geosynchronous orbit, that "stationary" is a kind trick of perspective when viewed from the frame of fixed stars.

Of course in the rotating frame of where we happen to be sitting on the Earth geostationary satellites are indeed actually stationary.

Comment Re: Rockets are too expensive (Score 1) 330

geosynchronous satellites: when the sun circulates over the north pole and it causes the satellite to exhibit the figure 8 orbit

geostationary : are fixed (fiction) stations , allegedly ground based

That is the most garbled explanation I've ever heard of geosynchronous orbits.

A geosynchronous orbit is one with a period that exactly matches the Earth's rate of rotation.

Geostationary orbits are a special case of geosynchronous orbits where the angle inclination of the orbit to the Earth's equator is zero.

So: a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit that is also geostationary appears to continually hover 22,236 miles above some point on the Earth's equator. If it is in a geosynchronous orbit that is not geostationary, it will appear from the earth to drift north and south of the celestial equator, tracing a figure 8 against the background stars over the course of one Earth rotation.

Of course in both cases the satellite would actually be following an elliptical (in fact almost perfectly circular) path around the Earth. The "stationary" or "figure 8" thing is simply a trick of perspective -- the way car in the next lane traveling at the same speed appears not to be moving.

Yeah, most of you knew all that. But insofar as there's an explanation here, it oughtn't be gibberish.

Comment Re:Poor on $100k? Sure (Score 1) 668

People can adapt to just about anything. If you live in a ditch, then a shack feels like a mansion. If the people around you live in mansions, a perfectly serviceable house seems like a shack.

It's the Red Queen's race:

"Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!"

And once you've adapted to running twice as fast, you'll have to run twice as fast yet again to feel like you're progressing.

That's why I say the most important thing in your profession, once you have achieved enough income to live modestly and set a little aside for the future, is to find work that is in itself rewarding.

Comment Re:Less than public transit? (Score 1) 320

That way the founders and investors could get out with their cash and Wall St. (read - your 401(k)) would be left holding the bag.

Only if the managers of your 401(k) were idiots.

After all, the Fed is pumping so much printed money into the system something has to soak up all that extra cash.

The Fed doesn't just "print money", either figurative or literally (the Treasury does the literal printing). It has several methods for adding money to the economy, all of which are quite reversible.

Comment Re:Time for USPS to sue him for defamation (Score -1, Troll) 150

USPS DID loose the package!

They they also lose your elementary school text books in transit right at that critical moment when your teacher was trying to get you to understand the difference between "loose" and "lose?"

the box was sitting in a Atlanta for over a month

Which was probably the same week when you'd have been learning about using "an" in front of words that start with vowels, though that still doesn't help that sentence make any more sense. An Atlanta what?

the recipient who's address is on the box

The recipient who is address on the box? Or did you mean "whose?"

It's getting pretty bad out there. It's a good thing people are spending thousands of dollars and hours reviving old 8-bit video games! Whew!

Comment Re:"Research Projects" (Score 1) 74

The problem is that all these attempts to interest kids in STEM are so earnest and dull.

What we should be doing is tempting them with mad science. You see? It's not all death rays and monkey testicle implants.

It's important to hook them by middle school, when the all important sense of being misunderstood is its keenest.

Comment Re:motivation (Score 1) 192

Yeah, he'll never get around, for example, to orders reducing regulatory burdens. Oh, right! Already done. Or any movement at all to start to undo the financial stranglehold that Obamacare has put onto people forced to fear IRS enforcement if they don't go broke buying insurance they can't use ... oh, right! Already done, with more under way. I guess we could run down the long list, but you already know it and you're pretending you don't so you can engage in more lefty denialism. Carry on! It obviously is your coping mechanism.

Comment Re:Call me crazy... (Score 1) 89

Well, they're both solutions. But they run afoul of questions. Which users benefit most from each solution? And if someone benefits most from the massive battery with conservative display and processor specs, can you sell it to him?

I'll tell you right here that I'd much prefer LG's approach, but I'm an engineer. I think about my requirements differently than most people.

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