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Comment Re:La Niña is about to bite us in the arse (Score 1) 130

Be fair, "the greatest climate disaster" started long before Trump took office. It might even be before Lincoln. It's just that nobody noticed it at the time, because it's taken a long time to build. Trump may, however, be president at a point of inflection (a point, because you can't even roughly model it with simple quadratic function). Things are, indeed, likely to get worse quickly for a bit, but Trump didn't cause that, he's just been refusing to ameliorate it.

Comment Re:OMG Fuck apple (Score 1) 28

Sorry, but it's a reasonable request. It may also be reasonable to deny it, but it's a reasonable request. There's no way that a "driver" who's just been sitting there playing a game on his phone will be able to take over the driving in 10 seconds, so the steering wheel is useless in emergencies.

Comment Re:Next item on News at 10 (Score 1) 87

I think you're wrong. This is my perspective:
  - - - - - -
Sorry, but it's really "expect leaks". Every place has leaks. If your staff considers your actions immoral, then you should expect damaging leaks. If they are supportive, then you should expect supportive leaks. (They may actually be damaging, but their intended purpose will be to bolster your image. Similarly the "damaging leaks" may actually be harmless, or even useful, but their intended purpose would be to injure you.)

People are lousy at keeping secrets, even when they intend to...and they'd often rather seem to offer proof that they "know what's what".

Vetting your staff is supposed to ensure that they consider what you are doing as just and moral. The same as any criminal gang. (Note that I didn't mention legal.) That way when they leak it will be generally supportive.

Comment Re:Sadly? (Score 1) 379

So how about when I'm at home watching baseball on my time and they expect me to actually answer the phone if they call?

And if they want me to log in using my personal computer and internet connection, do I gain personal ownership of the project?Why not, a portion was developed on my time using my resources.

Comment Re:You were hired to work for THEM (Score 1) 379

There is a barrier between work and the rest of one's life. It may be impermeable or permeable. Ever have to work late, come in on a weekend, deal with work emails or calls after hours? It just got permeable. That permeability goes in both directions. That's not so complicated.

Comment Re:No. (Score 1) 270

No, that's not normal. 300 mg/day is well below the normal cardiac diet at a hospital. Every time she's admitted she has to fight with the diet kitchen to get food she can eat. People can have LOTS of variation in their needs, much more than is usually acknowledged even by those who are specialists in, e.g., diet, and certainly more than is usually acknowledged by non-specialists.

Comment Re:source (Score 1) 234

Yes, but at the time being discussed I'm not sure there is any evidence for the existence of ocean-viable boats. We're talking well back in the old stone age, and the Pacific near the Aleutians isn't peaceful. At later periods this would be a quite important point, and I'm rather sure that the inhabitants of the Kuril and Aleutian islands would prove to be related well back in time, but probably not far before the invention of the proto-kayak. (They might even not have gotten to the islands before then.)

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Comment Re:I often think dietary "science" is a myth (Score 1) 270

There is a significant difference. Fizzy drinks chemically dissolve the teeth as well as feeding bacteria who do the same thing a lot more slowly.

Cokes are worse than fruit juice, and, unless you are on certain medications, unsweetened grapefruit juice (made from white rather than pink grapefruit) is probably good for you...in moderation.

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