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Comment Re:So how about... (Score 2) 123

Hmm....this sounds to me like yet another reason not to want to live in a dense, urban setting where you have no land or yard of your own, are sharing walls with neighbors and can't even have a nice backyard/patio to have friends over for a BBQ or crawfish boil.

I know it suits some, but man...I'd not like to live that crowded.

I like not having a problem getting things delivered to me.

To each his own I guess.

Comment Yeah, you do... but no, we don't. (Score 1) 255

I drive on highways with 55-65 MPH speed limits, just like everyone for the last 50 years, with cars built for those speeds.

From time to time, I drive a 2016 corvette on Montana highways with 80 mph speed limits. It is fair to say that the car loafs along. It was absolutely built for these speeds, and speeds considerably higher. I often reach those higher speeds. [Um. Allegedly. Cough.] Many other models are built with similar capabilities. The highways here are well designed for those speeds. Even many of the secondary roads here are pretty good for them, though not as good.

Methinks you are thinking well inside your own box. Poorly. Which makes me raise my eyebrows at your assertion that you are a physicist. That may be unfair; many people are notably vertical in their strengths. But still, my eyebrows are raised. :)

We can also (if we are honest) observe that progress, and the potential it unleashes in many cases, is not all that closely linked with what's commercially available or common around the time of the fundamental invention. In the first decade after lasers were invented, for instance, there was no significant commercial application. When the integrated circuit was invented, it wasn't much to look at and functionally speaking, for decades, it was outright pitiful compared to ICs today. We're still dealing with developing a full understanding of how neurons do what they do. In laser parlance, in 2017 we are yet pre-laser, and anyone who tries to tell us that lasers can't do X at this point should be considered, at most, a hand-waver in the grips of a fit of profound hubris.

WRT the subject at hand - intelligence and consciousness resulting from information processing - nature has, fortunately enough, provided numerous models at various levels. So we know it can be done at least one way - neural-like systems. Sure, it's obviously not easy. Brains use very small, very complicated, and very difficult to understand computing elements.

But achieving a manufactured intelligence is also obviously highly interesting and to many, highly desirable. Assuming only that our technological progress doesn't actually halt due to some unrelated factor (war, asteroid, runaway climate, alien invasion, etc.), there are many reasons, all supporting one another very, very well, to assume that we will "get there from here." Not the least of which is there are many (sub-)reasons to presume that will be a great deal of economic leverage in such technology.

And, perhaps most relevant to you, there are no known physics related reasons to presume that we won't get there eventually. As you should know very well. If one is (or multiple are) discovered - for instance, should it be determined at some point in the future that brains use some heretofore unknown physics mechanism(s) to do what they do - then we may quite suddenly be on different grounds in terms of ultimate practicality. But there isn't even a hint of this as yet. It definitely appears to be chemistry, electricity, and topology all the way down as far as brains go. That stuff, we can do. Larger and clumsier and perhaps even slower... perhaps even only as emulation... yet we can do it. We just don't know exactly what to do. Yet.

Comment They're still people (Score 2) 387

The expectation is that the salaried position is a 40 hr/wk position.

If you treat your employees only as a measurable commodity, entering into no acknowledgment of their worth, individuality, and personal potential, while attempting to mine every second of their time like a greedy, annoying crow, or worse, if you attempt to sit on those things and repress who they are, then your employees will not be loyal. This is inevitable.

When the first even nominally better opportunity (which might not even be better on grounds of pay, since everything else at your place sucks so bad) and they'll be gone. Because you made them hate you.

Which you deserved.

Sane employment is pleasant, goal seeking and reward-rich. For everyone. Not based on counting drops of sweat and screaming when the count is short. Balance liberty against compassion in tension as you encourage your employees to chase your goals and their goals. Otherwise you run the risk of just turning out to be considered another reviled prick.

I've run several very successful businesses. I'm not guessing here. Happy people do better work. Period.

Comment Re:Well, sadly, probably.... (Score 1) 387

Most employment agreements are such that the company owns it even if it is outside of normal hours. So inventions you come up with on your own time are not yours.

I've seen this on some W2 and 1099 contracts...and I simple line them out saying that what I do outside hours on MY time is my business and my intellectual property.

They usually agree easily as long as you're not in direct competition with them.

Most all of those agreements are boilerplate they got from their lawyers to try to cover everything, but most I find are amendable to reasonable changes like this.....

Comment Well, sadly, probably.... (Score 5, Interesting) 387

If you are a W2 employee and working on company time on your own projects, you might have more to worry about than being fired.

If you are creating new content, inventing a new gadget, etc....and you do it on company time, you may find that you DO NOT OWN what you have created.

Many if not most employment contracts/agreements have verbiage that states that anything you come up with on company time, belongs to the company.

They may not fire you, but they will now own it and you won't make any $$ on the side for it....

Comment Re: What is needed.. (Score 4, Informative) 372

Cobal is a crazy nuanced language that is hardware specific.

Absolutely wrong. One of the language's biggest selling point when it was first created is the source code is completely hardware agnostic. To demonstrate this, the developers compiled the same program (from the same deck of punched cards) on three different brands of computer, ran the program with the same deck of input data and got the exact same results. The only change they had to make was one card in the Environment Section, and all that card did was specify the target machine.

Comment Re:What happens? (Score 2) 200

Consider this: a late night host shows up on TV and does a 5 minute monologue 5 nights a week. Most comedians spend about 3-6 months writing and testing material to do 15 minutes.

Using writers is the only way to create more than a small fraction of the TV time people demand.

Well, there are talented people out that that *can* do it. Hell, Robin Williams (rip)...could pretty much riff off anything any time anywhere....

There's talented folks out there that can do it daily and don't need a ton of writers behind them.

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