Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re: Bad Headline (Score 1) 541

I found you an example, one on which he even doubled down later.

If you refuse to understand the plain meaning of the words uttered in that example, I'm afraid I cannot help you. You will just keep saying "that's not what he meant" or "that shouldn't be taken serious" or "he said something else later" regardless of any actual quote, so why bother? We've seen how it works multiple times during the election.

And if that is the case, any conversation with you is fundamentally meaningless for any purpose other than gathering data on how to thwart you and your ilk as much as possible. I'm certainly not going to convince you of anything.

Comment Re: Bad Headline (Score 1) 541

The question doesn't ask about a specific Trump plan - that would be impossible, because Trump contradicts himself all the time. They ask about a specific plan of a "national Muslim registry", which was talked about by Trump during the election. The lack of details is deliberate - it shouldn't really matter what such a plan entails, exactly, the only sensible answer for anything with such a name is "no".

Comment Re: Those who something, something (Score 1) 541

No, there isn't one. But this statement doesn't establish a clear separation of church and state. The way it has been historically interpreted by pretty much every Christian society, is that there should be a distinct secular leaders (and hierarchy under them) and religious leaders (and hierarchy under them), but they are not separate. The secular leaders have a duty to promote and spread religion, and protect it from attacks (including ideological attacks - punishing heresies etc). And the religious leaders preach that it's a religious duty to obey the [righteous] secular leaders, and bless their policies. This has been the case since Constantine, and the Greek even concocted a term for this arrangement - "symphonia of powers".

In practice, you still get a theocracy.

Comment Re: Bad Headline (Score 1) 541

Which part of the question is loaded?

It's very blunt and straightforward: if the Trump administration follows up on any of his campaign promises wrt Muslim registry, will you assist? Yes/no?

And it's not even out of the blue. It's not like it is a deliberately concocted hypothetical scenario. It is something that Trump himself has talked about, repeatedly. It's not at all unreasonable to ask companies whether they would be involved.

Comment Dell Precision (Score 1) 254

I got a precision with a touch screen and a Linux preinstall (No windows) a couple months ago and the thing works great. The default wireless doesn't connect so well, though. I found I get much faster wireless if I use wicd-gtk. Touch screen works with Ubuntu, as well!

Comment Re:Security is an illusion (Score 1) 153

There's just too much volume to track all the content everywhere.

There are 350 million people in the USA, more or less. Including kids not of age to use computers. One computer, just one, operates at billions of instructions per second (when the code is written in anything efficient, like c.) The NSA has a newish huge data center located on the main trunks.

You do the math. If you still think they can't sieve that amount of data effectively, why then, good on you for your optimism. :)

Comment Re:Trump Derangement Syndrome (Score 1) 541

Trump is assumed by some to have won based on (anticipated) EC votes. However, three facts:

1 - The EC hasn't voted yet.

2 - The EC does not have to vote for Trump.

3 - Clinton got (a lot) more votes from, you know, the people.

Trump may well end up to be president. But he isn't the president yet; he isn't even the president-elect yet.

Comment Re:No possible problem with this at all. (Score 1) 62

The problem is perspective. The road is flat, so what's projected on it will not appear as the same shape for someone looking on it from elsewhere.

No. If you project what appears to be a "zebra crossing" onto the street, it has to appear on the street in the same place as a real zebra crossing for the driver to see it as such.

There are perspective issues involved, but they exist for both the projection and the viewer. You cannot simply project an image of a zebra crossing onto the street, you have to distort it to take the surface into account. And the viewer's brain will take care of the reverse perspective problem, taking the distorted regular striped pattern as seen on the retinal surface and converting it into "zebra crossing" in the brain.

This is one of the reasons why a HUD would be a better solution to this problem. Not only will the info be invisible (and thus not distracting) to outside observers, it is a much simpler problem to manage the perspective and transformations necessary to project the correct data.

Perform this thought experiment. You are in a large lecture hall. There is a computer projector displaying a circle on the screen at the front of the room. The projector electronics have taken the angles into account and distorted the incoming video signal so that the displayed image is a circle on the screen. Now move about the room so your perspective of the screen changes. The image on your retina will change based on your angle to the screen, but your brain will still see a circle.

Comment No possible problem with this at all. (Score 3, Interesting) 62

projects a stop sign onto the road out ahead.

Or projects a different sign. Other vehicles see that sign and assume it must be right, ignoring the posted stop sign (or other traffic control device) and causing an accident. I see absolutely no risk in each vehicle creating it's own moving traffic control system.

Especially when it starts projecting "zebra crossings" into the street. That's going to create a mess and be quite a process here in Oregon where there is a crosswalk at every intersection. What fun, when a pedestrian sees the oncoming car projecting crosswalk markings so they assume the driver is aware of it and steps out into the street assuming the driver is already planning on stopping. Hilarity ensues.

Slashdot Top Deals

In every hierarchy the cream rises until it sours. -- Dr. Laurence J. Peter

Working...