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Comment Re:A way better solution (Score 1) 234

Literally never seen another stuck signal, and that was a temporary kit pulled from the trailer of a work vehicles. What makes you think this is a big problem?

Having seen several stuck signals in my home town. But then I guess a lot more signals are stuck for bikes than for cars.

Comment Re:FCC says wha? (Score 2) 74

It hasn't been squelched because it isn't consumer-friendly. It actually causes even bigger problems, because the obnoxious scammers have already changed their tactics, and now are using actual phone numbers that belong to other people.

About two weeks, I got a text message from somebody asking why I called them. I had not made any phone calls in nearly a day at the time, as verified on my phone. And I keep getting telemarketing calls from random assigned phone numbers in the area that belong to random individuals, all of whom are innocent victims.

It is not sufficient to ban calls from unassigned numbers. Our phone network is hopelessly insecure, dating back to the days when only trusted carriers could add calls into the system. The only way to fix this is to ensure that at every injection point, the system verifies that the call is really coming from where it claims to be coming from—one wire, one or more fixed number blocks. And because there are probably major carriers complicit with this abuse, doing this right would require some sort of authenticated source check further down the line as well. This would probably require a major rearchitecting, which is why it probably won't happen any time soon. Basically, we need the equivalent of TLS and CAs for the phone network....

Comment FCC says wha? (Score 1) 74

I'm kinda dumbfounded this consumer freindly move wasn't squelched yet. After all the logic for the FCC nixing net neutrality and consumer privacy was because this stifles innovative revenue streams for productizing consumers. Actually I think they just said "bussiness innovation" for short. In anycase stopping robocalls seems like it will hurt someones revenue stream. You should write your congessman and demand to be productized more! Seriously, what's the angle here. My guess is that maybe the carrier's and google and all the rest want to prevent all the free robo calls and create a partner channel for authorized, paid, robocalls.

Comment Re:Complain daily (Score 1) 234

They don't need me to tell them it's a bad intersection

They do if the city uses citizen reports as a metric to prioritize allocating budget for improvements to its intersections.

Another thing... are you suggesting that my lack of reporting this makes my analysis of the issue less valid?

No. But in my opinion, one analyzes an issue in order to find a solution.

Or are you simply trying to gently redirect the conversation

Yes. The conversation went in one direction, namely clarification of the problem with this particular approach. Once I realized the problem was an underprovisioned LTYOG, that direction concluded, and I redirected it toward what can be done about the problem.

from pointing out that your counterpoint isn't very good to a conversation about my poor citizenship?

I'm trying to be helpful, suggesting measures that have a chance of getting a problem solved.

Comment Re:Holy Blinking Cursor, Batman! (Score 4, Funny) 200

Yeah, my old Commodore 64 had a blinking cursor, and it somehow managed that remarkable feat with an 8-bit 6510 CPU running at 1MHz!!!

Behold the power of Javascript! It gives a modern PC with 8-16 GHz of total CPU ... less actualy processing power than a Commodore 64.

Well done JS engine guys. Well done.

Comment Re:A way better solution (Score 1) 234

How is a motorist stopped at such an unresponsive signal expected to recover the use of his or her vehicle?

Technically, you don't.

So in other words, all motorists using British roads are subject to having their vehicles seized at any time for any reason through deployment of a red traffic signal. Or what am I missing?

We turned around

That would work in theory except for a one-way street or an intersection with a no U-turn sign.

rang the police

Using what? Are all motorists using British roads required to keep a valid subscription to mobile phone service?

In addition, I tried ringing city services in my own (U.S.) city when facing a red light that would not respond to my bicycle stopped making a chord of the induction loop's sensor, and representatives blew off the report repeatedly. Or is government attitude toward reports of stuck traffic signals a difference between Britain and the U.S.?

Comment Re:Amazon isn't moving (Score 1) 76

These aren't taxes on activities that happened in America. If they decided to incorporate in e.g. the Caymans, they'd still owe US tax on US activities, just like today, but they wouldn't owe US tax on stuff made, shipped, and consumed in Europe, like they do today.

It's the tax system that's fucked up here.

Comment Re:Conflict of interest (Score 1) 234

If you enter on yellow it should be because you were going to fast and were too close to stop safely, so leaving before it turns red shouldn't be a problem.

Only if the yellow is long enough. I've seen many lights where if there's only one car at the intersection and you're turning left, you can enter on green and you'll still exit two or three seconds after the light turns red. A car approaching from behind at any speed even remotely approaching the speed limit would then enter on yellow without time to stop, but would have to slow down for you and would be unable to get out of the light until long after it turned red.

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