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Comment Re:Never give a number (Score 1) 435

This response by this person is part of the problem - it's so damned simple, if every employee refused, the issue would drop.

However the pay-to-play society we've built makes saying no a problem as most people are leveraged over their head, starting with their consumerist education leading to a huge student debt to be paid, as well as blatant bling bling consumerism. All this leads to the viewpoint expressed in the parent post.

Smart people know debt is slavery and avoid it, money is power for certain.

Comment Re:A perfect Christmas gift... (Score 1) 188

Agreed - I have over 400 vinyl albums, most of which I ripped to Mp3 only because I don't want to pay twice for music I already have - so I have to put up with the clicks, hiss, rumble and wow and fultter of vinyl while listening to these tracks, and do not for one second think that audiophile vinyl is any better, it is not, digital blows vinyl out of the water, that is why vinyl was left behind so long ago.

Hipsters like vinyl, 70s chopper motorcycles and skinny skateboards, all three are sucky technology, the 70s choppers are outright dangerous, something those with a few years under their belt know; they're the ones that left them behind for better tech.

Submission + - T-Mobile CFO: Repeal of Net Neutrality Would Be 'Positive For My Industry' (tmonews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: T-Mobile CFO Braxton Carter spoke at the UBS Global Media and Communications Conference in New York City, and he touched a bit on President-elect Donald Trump and what his election could mean for the mobile industry. Carter expects that a Trump presidency will foster an environment that’ll be more positive for wireless. “It’s hard to imagine, with the way the election turned out, that we’re not going to have an environment, from several aspects, that is not going to be more positive for my industry,” the CFO said. He went on to explain that there will likely be less regulation, something that he feels “destroys innovation and value creation.” Speaking of innovation, Carter also feels that a reversal of net neutrality and the FCC’s Open Internet rules would be good for innovation in the industry, saying that it “would provide opportunity for significant innovation and differentiation” and that it’d enable you to “do some very interesting things.”

Submission + - SPAM: Transport employees were secretly paid by the DEA to search travelers bags

schwit1 writes: THERE are many reasons why you might have been stopped at an American transport hub and your bag searched by officials. You might have be chosen at random. Perhaps you matched a profile. Or you could have been flagged by an airline, railroad or security employee who was being secretly paid by the government as a confidential informant to uncover evidence of drug smuggling.

A committee of Congress heard remarkable testimony last week about a long-running programme by the Drug Enforcement Administration. For years, officials from the Department of Justice testified, the DEA has paid millions of dollars to a variety of confidential sources to provide tips on travellers who may be transporting drugs or large sums of money. Those sources include staff at airlines, Amtrak, parcel services and even the Transportation Safety Administration.

The testimony follows a report by the Justice Department that uncovered the DEA programme and detailed its many potential violations. According to that report, airline employees and other informers had an incentive to search more travellers' bags, since they received payment whenever their actions resulted in DEA seizures of cash or contraband. The best-compensated of these appears to have been a parcel company employee who received more than $1m from the DEA over five years. One airline worker, meanwhile, received $617,676 from 2012 to 2015 for tips that led to confiscations. But the DEA itself profited much more from the programme. That well-paid informant got only about 12% of the amount the agency seized as a result of the his tips.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Two Backdoors Found in Sony IP Cameras

Trailrunner7 writes: A long list of IP-enabled security cameras made by Sony contain backdoors in their firmware that can allow an attacker to run arbitrary code remotely on the devices and potentially opening them up for use in a botnet.

The cameras affected by the vulnerabilities are surveillance cameras, mainly used in enterprises and retail settings and there are dozens of models that contain the vulnerable firmware. Researchers at SEC Consult discovered the backdoors and found that an attacker could use one of them to enable hidden Telnet and SSH services on the cameras and then use the other backdoor to gain root privileges.

“After enabling Telnet/SSH, another backdoor allows an attacker to gain access to a Linux shell with root privileges! The vulnerabilities are exploitable in the default configuration over the network. Exploitation over the Internet is possible, if the web interface of the device is exposed," the researchers said.

Submission + - California Bill Would Mandate Reporting of 'Superbug' Infections, Deaths (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A California state senator introduced a bill on Monday that would mandate reporting of antibiotic-resistant infections and deaths and require doctors to record the infections on death certificates when they are a cause of death. The legislation also aims to establish the nation’s most comprehensive statewide surveillance system to track infections and deaths from drug-resistant pathogens. Data from death certificates would be used to help compile an annual state report on superbug infections and related deaths. In September, a Reuters investigation revealed that tens of thousands of superbug deaths nationwide go uncounted every year. The infections are often omitted from death certificates, and even when they are recorded, they aren’t counted because of the lack of a unified national surveillance system. Because there is no federal surveillance system, monitoring of superbug infections and deaths falls to the states. A Reuters survey of all 50 state health departments and the District of Columbia found that reporting requirements vary widely. Hill’s bill would require hospitals and clinical labs to submit an annual summary of antibiotic-resistant infections to the California Department of Health beginning July 1, 2018; amend a law governing death certificates by requiring that doctors specify on death certificates when a superbug was the leading or a contributing cause of death; and require the state Health Department to publish an annual report on resistant infections and deaths, including data culled from death certificates.

Submission + - Google Preparing 'Invisible ReCAPTCHA' System For No user Interaction (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google engineers are working on an improved version of the reCAPTCHA system that uses a computer algorithm to distinguish between automated bots and real humans, and requires no user interaction at all. Called "Invisible reCAPTCHA," and spotted by Windows IT Pro, the service is still under development, but the service is open for sign-ups, and any webmaster can help Google test its upcoming technology. Invisible reCAPTCHA comes two years after Google has revolutionized CAPTCHA technologies by releasing the No CAPTCHA reCAPTCHA service that requires users to click on one checkbox instead of solving complex visual puzzles made up of words and numbers. The service helped reduce the time needed to fill in forms, and maintained the same high-level of spam detection we've become accustomed from the reCAPTCHA service. The introduction of the new Invisible reCAPTCHA technology is unlikely to make the situation better for Tor users since CloudFlare will likely force them to solve the same puzzle if they come from IPs seen in the past performing suspicious actions. Nevertheless, CloudFlare started working on an alternative.

Comment Re:"people largely irrelevant" (Score 1) 541

AI will make CEOs irrelevant as well - I am sure an algorithm can do a much better job of analyzing business data and making decisions smarter and faster than any dunderhead CEO and the boards of all companies will be more than happy to get rid of these overpaid meat sticks that cost the company a small fortune...

Submission + - How Windows 10's data collection trades your privacy for Microsoft's security (pcworld.com)

jader3rd writes: PCworld has an article on how Microsoft uses Windows 10 telemetry to improve the security of the end user:



But the telemetry data is used for more than how to improve or evolve Windows. There is an actual security impact, too. Knowledge is power, and in the case of Windows 10, that usage data lets Microsoft beef up threat protection, says Rob Lefferts, Microsoft’s director of program management for Windows Enterprise and Security.

The information collected is used to improve various components in Windows Defender, such as Application Guard and Advanced Threat Detection (these two features are available only to customers with Windows 10 Enterprise with Anniversary Update and Enterprise E5 subscriptions). As Windows 10’s built-in security tool, Windows Defender uses real-time protection to scan everything downloaded or run on the PC. The information from these scans is sent back to Microsoft and used to improve protection for everyone else.


Submission + - Chinese Scientist Found Breakthrough Vaccine/Cures for All Viral Infections (scmp.com)

hackingbear writes: Chinese scientists may have found the key to creating effective vaccines for the world’s deadly viruses including bird flu, SARS, Ebola, and HIV. An experiment by a research team at Beijing University was hailed as “revolutionary” in the field in a paper published in the latest issue of Science magazine on Friday. The live virus used in the vaccine used by the researchers had its genetic code tweaked to disable the viral strains’ self-replication mechanism. But it was kept fully infectious to allow the host animal cells to generate immunity. Using live viruses in their fully infectious form was considered taboo, as viruses spread rapidly. Vaccines sold and used widely today generally contain either dead or weakened forms of viruses. The animals infected with virus were cured after receiving the injection, according to the paper. This breakthrough promises to simplify the process of producing vaccines, which may help scientists develop effective vaccines or even cures for various viruses – such bird flu, SARS, Ebola and HIV – within weeks of an outbreak.

Comment Re:Didn't reveal much (Score 1) 74

Not only did it not reveal much, but after I left the browser and went to work on my second monitor, it made all kinds of wrong determinations regarding browser usage and interaction, including reporting the mouse was hovering over the button which is not possible since my mouse was nowhere near the browser window.

JavaScript and NOT scientifically proven results - perfect combo for dodo marketers!

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