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Submission + - Sitting in the car idling while using PDA? Turn it off! (iturnitoff.com)

al0ha writes: I've noticed many people have a habit of getting in their car, starting the engine, then sit and use their PDA for many minutes, sometimes 10 or more, while the car is idling. They do this when there is absolutely no reason whatsoever to do so and I for one would like to see people crease this wasteful practice. It's bad for your wallet, it's bad for the environment.

How bad you ask? Visit the link and find out, up to 12 million gallons of fuel are wasted idling every day according to their statistic, and they are not even counting the people idling while txting etc.

Concerned with global warming? Turn off your freakin' car when there is no reason for it to be running.

Comment It worked in my case (Score 1) 1116

Though I never received "basic income" I did inherit enough money 20 years ago, low 5 figures, to quit the stressful lame job I had working for an idiot, because I felt empowered by the inheritance and would not have to work to pay my living expenses for a while if I budgeted and kept my expenses to a minimum. In that time I learned enough about the Internet and computing in general to start my own hosting business (no VC required) and kept learning as I worked. I eventually sold that business and transitioned into the job I have today. And that is not the end of the story, as I have become empowered again through the sale of a domain name, and am starting a completely new business venture, again no VC required.

The point being that it is true, a sense of independent security, achieved by having your basic needs met while you try to improve yourself, is so very empowering, and allows the spirited entrepreneur to accomplish that which would otherwise be virtually impossible.

Comment The big question here is (Score 1) 108

Where are the miscreants getting such good data? I certainly don't believe they are scraping it off the web; more likely criminal organizations are legitimately purchasing this data from Alexa, TRD, Facebook, Google and others whose primary business is selling data about you to third parties. Big business cares very little about whom they are actually doing business with, as long as the money is good, the sale is made.

Comment I read this as (Score 1) 182

Hey, it was so easy to spy on everyone for any reason, and whaaaa.... now you've made that difficult. Cry baby, cry....

I really wish the FBI would just get over it - strong encryption is necessary for people to maintain any sense of freedom whatsoever as without privacy there is no freedom.

Comment Re: Now B-Sides is full of useless presentations? (Score 0) 91

Lame attempt at a burn by a useless troll, there is no relevance to the original post which clearly indicates the impression B-Sides is becoming lame and *security researchers * like the one providing this presentation in a forum where the less knowledgeable attend to learn something useful have been ripped-off by someone trying to make some kind of name for themselves with a presentation that in effect should have been a three liner post to security forums.

Sooooo laaammmeee.....

Submission + - Verizon Accused of Helping Spammers by Routing Millions of Stolen IP Addresses (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Spamhaus, an international non-profit organization that hunts down spammers, is accusing Verizon of indifference and facilitation of cybercrime because it failed for the past six months to take down stolen IP routes hosted on its network from where spam emails originated. Spamhaus detected over 4 million IP addresses, mainly stolen from China and Korea, and routed on Verizon's servers with forged paperwork.

Submission + - SSH Backdoor Found in Fortinet Firewalls (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The IT world was shaken a few weeks ago when Juniper Network firewalls were found to cointain "unauthorized code" that seemed to enable a backdoor. Now, Fortinet firewalls have been found to contain an apparent SSH backdoor as well. "According to the exploit code, the undisclosed authentication works on versions 4.3 up to 5.0.7. If correct, the surreptitious access method was active in FortiOS versions current in the 2013 and 2014 time frame and possibly earlier, based on this rough release history. The weakness was eventually patched, but so far, researchers have been unable to locate a security advisory that disclosed the alternative authentication method or the hard-coded password." A spokesperson for Fortinet told El Reg, "This was not a 'backdoor' vulnerability issue but rather a management authentication issue."

Submission + - Graphene Flakes Facilitate Neuromorphic Chips (ieee.org)

An anonymous reader writes: One of the hot areas of semiconductor research right now is the creation of so-called neuromorphic chips — processors that have their transistors networked to interact the way neurons do. "One way of building such transistors is to construct them of lasers that rely on an encoding approach called “spiking.” Depending on the input, the laser will either provide a brief spike in its output of photons or not respond at all. Instead of using the on or off state of the transistor to represent the 1s and 0s of digital data, these neural transistors rely on the time intervals between spikes." Now, research published in Nature Scientific Reports has shown how how to stabilize these laser spikes, so that they're responsive at picosecond intervals. "The team achieved this by placing a tiny piece of graphene inside a semiconductor laser. The graphene acts as a “saturable absorber,” soaking up photons and then emitting them in a quick burst. Graphene, it turns out, makes a good saturable absorber because it can take up and release a lot of photons extremely fast, and it works at any wavelength; so lasers emitting different colors could be used simultaneously, without interfering with each other—speeding processing."

Submission + - Algorithms Claim to Hunt Terrorists While Protecting the Privacy of Others (vice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Computer scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have developed an algorithmic framework for conducting targeted surveillance of individuals within social networks while protecting the privacy of untargeted digital bystanders.

Submission + - The 40,000-Mile Volcano (nytimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The NY Times reports on one of the wonders of the underwater world: the line of volcanoes and hydrothermal vents present where tectonic plates meet and grind against one another. "Welcome to one of the planet’s most obscure but important features, known rather prosaically as the midocean ridges. Though long enough to circle the moon more than six times, they receive little notice because they lie hidden in pitch darkness." The magma seeping through these cracks generate massive amounts of heat — enough to sustain incredible ecosystems.

But as scientists have gained a deeper understanding of this geological phenomenon, they realize it's more chaotic than they had imagined. "The old idea was that the eruptions of oozing lava and related activity occurred at fairly steady rates. Now, studies hint at the existence of outbursts large enough to influence not only the character of the global sea but the planet’s temperature. Experts believe the activity may carry major repercussions because the oceanic ridges account for some 70 percent of the planet’s volcanic eruptions. By definition, that makes them enormous sources of heat and exotic minerals as well as such everyday gases as carbon dioxide, which all volcanoes emit."

Submission + - Chinese TV station replaced its meteorologist with a chatbot (washingtonpost.com)

Earthquake Retrofit writes: “[She is] very hard-working!” said Song Jiongming, news director of Shanghai Media Group, which runs Dragon TV, in an email interview. “Xiaoice works more efficiently than human forecasters.”

When the anchor on “Morning News” needs a weather report, he introduces Xiaoice (pronounced shao-ice), a computer program that delivers the forecast with a female voice and is programmed to include a personal, human touch.

Xiaoice originated as a creation of Microsoft’s artificial intelligence team in China, which wanted to make an online service that would answer users’ questions and add an emotional, human touch.

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