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Comment Re:The problems are many (Score 1) 36

No doubt about it, but look at it: Frankly, it looks like something you'd expect in some cheesy 60s scifi movie. People are used to appliances that are closed black boxes that just spew out what they're supposed to produce, they don't want to see the wiring under the board.

Yes, I do and yes, I agree, the Prusa is a great design and I love it every time I use it, but the topic here is the question why this didn't get mass appeal. And mass appeal is something gained and won by the way it looks. And this looks intimidating to the average Joe out there. It looks like something he won't get under control, and he's not going to shell out 740 bucks to find out whether he does.

Comment The problems are many (Score 1) 36

And one of the key ones is that there are too many out there. With heatpads and without, with this or that plastic, and let's not get started on the various designs on how to get the filament on the ground. Many different designs, some looking rather ridiculous like something Dr. Strangelove would have invented. Yes, it still is a rather experimental thing, and it looks the part, too.

And people don't want that. Especially with something they're supposed to pay a thousand bucks for or even more. What people want is something that "just works". And "just works", it sure doesn't. It needs tweaking and a lot of try and error to get it right.

And in the end, what do you get out of it? You can print plastic parts. Provided you have the design files for them. Umm... yeah, that's ... well, ... why sugar coat it, it's bullshit. Unless there is something you can print that you can't buy MUCH cheaper, there is exactly no point to drop a thousand bucks and go through all the hassle on top of it.

Comment Pretty much anything nowadays (Score 1) 166

I have recently installed several Dell and HP pro laptops with kubuntu without a hitch. For family, friends and work colleagues. Everything worked out of the box and if you install from a USB key, it takes about 10 minutes to install, reboot, aptitude update and full-upgrade, reboot, done.

On the other hand I tried a CentOS install, but the kernel was so old (3.10 for crying out loud) that it didn't recognize several recent hardware. I saw that and installed kubuntu over it.

Comment Re:The Decline of Big Media has been Noticed (Score 1) 210

The problem is that people equate being able and allowed to tell the truth with some sort of obligation to do so, and that's dangerous. You have the same effect as you do with people being dissatisfied with the medical system or with science. I do not want to believe in established science/pharmacy/news, and there is someone else who sells "non-establishment" science/pharmacy/news, so he must be right because "the establishment" is something I don't trust.

And that's dangerous.

Just because A is false doesn't automatically mean that B is true just because B contradicts A.

Comment Re:logging (Score 1) 92

what did they replace SystemD with and how does it log?

Unless they tell you so, you should assume they did something sensible like use something syslogd compatible, and if you don't like it, you can switch to another one. From googling I get the idea it's rsyslog.

Comment Re:Init alternatives (Score 1) 92

The truth is that the boot speed improvements of systemd are effectively notional. The boot process is so fast now that starting in parallel only saves you time when something goes wrong. If you regularly have a problem during boot, then you should think about fixing that regardless of what your init system is.

Comment Re:I thought diesel ran cleaner (Score 1) 210

Expanding isn't "reacting to heat".

What? What do you call it, then? I didn't say it was reacting with heat. Although it does react with oxygen in the presence of heat, to form NOx, that's explicitly not what I was talking about.

But, back to the original point: Diesel engines take in much more atmospheric air than gasoline engines when running at normal loads (highway cruising).

Yes. But they consume no more when wide open. The size of the exhaust is defined primarily by the maximum flow, not the cruising flow. (That defines other design characteristics more.) Diesels tend to have higher peak boost in spite of their typically higher static compression ratios, but they also tend to have significantly lower RPM limits and tend to run less RPMs while cruising.

Of course, all of this has been muddied by the introduction of the direct-injected gasoline engine, and by developments in diesel engine technology. Not only do GDI motors have higher cylinder pressures and thus higher temperatures, but there are also now diesels with [automated] throttles. As well, the recent crop of automatic transmissions with many gear ratios (8 now being common, 9 not being uncommon, and 10 beginning to roll out) and multiple overdrive ratios has led to gasoline engines being used at much lower RPMs...

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