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Comment No. p53 - the guardian of the genome. (Score 1) 114

All mammalian cells are constantly producing p53, and disposing of it. When they stop, repair or suicide should occur.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TP53

Once activated, p53 will induce a cell cycle arrest to allow either repair and survival of the cell or apoptosis to discard the damaged cell. How p53 makes this choice is currently unknown... First, the half-life of the p53 protein is increased drastically, leading to a quick accumulation of p53 in stressed cells. Second, a conformational change forces p53 to be activated as a transcription regulator in these cells....

Comment Quercetin (Score 1) 114

About a year ago it was discovered that the common dietary substance quercetin is able to kill senescent endothelial cells in the gi tract.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acel.12344/abstract

By transcript analysis, we discovered increased expression of pro-survival networks in senescent cells, consistent with their established resistance to apoptosis. Using siRNA to silence expression of key nodes of this network, including ephrins (EFNB1 or 3), PI3K, p21, BCL-xL, or plasminogen-activated inhibitor-2, killed senescent cells, but not proliferating or quiescent, differentiated cells. Drugs targeting these same factors selectively killed senescent cells. Dasatinib eliminated senescent human fat cell progenitors, while quercetin was more effective against senescent human endothelial cells and mouse BM-MSCs. The combination of dasatinib and quercetin was effective in eliminating senescent MEFs. In vivo, this combination reduced senescent cell burden in chronologically aged, radiation-exposed, and progeroid Ercc1/ mice. In old mice, cardiac function and carotid vascular reactivity were improved 5 days after a single dose.

Comment Re:I am very skeptical. (Score 1) 99

Unless, of course, the report assumes that anything running Lollipop or older is not recently patched, which seems like a reasonable assumption.

According to Google, 65.9% of users are on Lollipop or older. That means 29% of up-to-date Androids would have to come from 34.1% of users, or that 85% of Marshmallow and Nougat users are fully patched. I'm skeptical.

Also, nearly half of Android users are using an OS at least 2.5 years old. :-/ Compare with 79% of iOS users on a 6 month old OS, and 95% of iOS users on an OS less than 1.5 years old.

Submission + - SPAM: Quicken Bill Pay is No Longer Safe to Use 1

Bruce Perens writes: I don't usually make security calls, but when a company makes egregious and really clueless security mistakes, it's often the case that the only way to attract their attention and get the issue fixed is to publicize it. This one is with Quicken Bill Pay, a product of Metavante (not Intuit). It's from personal observation rather than an expert witness case, and the company has been unresponsive through their customer support channel.
Link to Original Source

Comment Abandoning Time-Worn Processes Leads to Atrophy (Score 5, Insightful) 158

Scientists determined that those people who made use of machine washing rather than hand washing had diminished hand strength and neurological motor communication necessary for fine motor control. Seamstresses who bought thread rather than using the spinning jenny were similarly impaired. But worst off were teamsters who used the internal combustion trucks rather than teams of horses and used forklifts and other mechanical devices rather than loading their vehicles by hand. Their overall body strength was much reduced.

Comment not anonymous (Score 1) 269

It appears that Bitcoin, a currency designed with anonymity in mind...

No. Bitcoin is designed around decentralization, not anonymity. Every transaction is logged forever; for anonymity, that's a nightmare. This misconception is widespread. Bitcoin is not anonymous; if privacy is important to you, you should not be using it.

Comment Re:Restructure gone wrong (Score 1) 299

Oh shit, that gives me PTSD hives. I worked at a startup with a sociopathic CEO who decided to pivot the week after Christmas. We all shuffled into the "living room" part of the office for a mandatory meeting, and he announced the big plan. Then he went around the room, calling out names and giving us our new roles. He didn't call all the names. "And for the rest of you: thank you for your contribution and hard work, but we've had to make some hard decisions and you won't be staying on."

Then - THEN! - the sumbitch called on each freshly-fired person in turn and asked them to talk about what their time with the company had meant to them. There were a few half-choked "I thank you for the opportunity to learn so much..." as the CEO smiled benevolently, pleased at himself for bringing such light into their sad lives.

Gah. I'd still cheerfully throw that guy under a bus. I mean, a literal bus.

Comment Re: why should i care?` (Score 1) 554

If what I read is correct they weren't students at the university and so it had no contractual agreement with them. So what did it owe them?

If this had been a government site - that they were obliged to use to file their taxes or apply for a driving license or whatever - that'd be different.

But it isn't.

The trouble is that the University of California Berkley IS a government site. At least, they are a state sponsored public university that receives public funding.

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