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Comment Re:It has its uses (Score 1) 273

Sure, lets look at two examples:
Iterative program:

variable loop_counter;
for ( loop_counter = 0; loop_counter < 10; loop_counter = loop_counter + 1 )
{
do_stuff()
}

Functional program:

function do_stuff_loop(x, x)
{ }
function do_stuff_loop(x, y)
{
do_stuff()
do_stuff_loop(x + 1, y)
}
do_stuff_loop(0, 10)

In the iterative example you have a variable which changes, causing pain to functional programmers who gaze upon it. In the second your iterator is still there, but it's hidden in the stack instead of being explicitly declared.

Comment Re:It has its uses (Score 3, Insightful) 273

There is certainly value in reducing the amount of state you are managing, but too often it seem like Functional programmers are willing to declare it gone when they've just swept it under the rug. Sure you don't have a variable now, but instead you have the logic tied up in your stack. This is especially true when the language does pattern matches on the parameters to determine which function to call. In the end you have to keep track of that iterator somehow, and I tend to think something like a for loop tends to be clearer than looking through the function headers to figure out how the loop is initialized and when it terminates.

Comment Re:Logic and Reason, or lack thereof (Score 0) 184

England was paying for information, paying informants, paying propagandists, jailing and killing people who spoke out publicly against the Crown's control

Citations would've been most helpful here, but let's stipulate, it is all true.

So, in the 18th century Britain was already doing all of that. And in the 20th it did too — and we still regard Alan Turing's efforts as nothing but heroic and decisive in turning the war in the Allies' favor and saving thousands of lives.

Why, then, are so many folks — yourself included — denouncing Turing's descendants at CIA, NSA and their British equivalents in the 21st century? Yes, they could spy on their own citizens illegally and it, likely, does happen — including political opposition. But they do, unfortunately, have a vast number of legitimate targets and their secretive efforts continue to save lives... To sabotage all of their efforts because they could sometimes be abusive is like banning cars because some times people die in them.

It is most refreshing to have a mainstream media outlet call the "leaker" a "traitor", but, when he is found, we are likely to discover, that he was lead to these actions by the Western public's suicidal attitudes towards earlier traitors — Snowden and Manning.

Comment Re:Fortran (Score 1) 566

Yep, me too... I was in fifth grade, our new Astronomy teacher — I'm about twice older now, than she was then (darn!) — offered the class to write a program for her for extra credit (I am pretty sure now, she needed it for her own class in college).

I took my dad's Fortran book and coded the thing up — something really simple, a loop doing something with an array... I never got to test it on anything, but I did get the extra credit...

Comment Re:Bullshit, Todd. (Score 1) 244

Nobody was forcing them to be parents. They were prepared to be parents and take the financial and emotional responsibility... that was the whole point of the procedure.

Yes, for a child born of their own genes. There are numerous disadvantages to raising a child who is not of your own genes. Such offspring is much less likely to be successful in every way due to a number of factors. Your offspring literally inherits traits you gained during your lifetime. This is important for creating rapport between parent and offspring. Keep in mind that it's a typical instinct for an ape to kill all the offspring of other males when he takes over a female.

Submission + - Second parchment manuscript copy of Declaration of Independence found (bostonglobe.com)

Okian Warrior writes: Two Harvard University researchers announced Friday that they have found a second parchment manuscript copy of the Declaration of Independence in a tiny records office in southern England.

The only other parchment copy is maintained by the National Archives in Washington, D.C., researchers Emily Sneff and Danielle Allen said in a statement.

The newly discovered document — which the two have dated to the 1780s — was found in the town of Chichester archives, and is believed to have originally belonged to Duke of Richmond who was known as the “Radical Duke,’’ for the support he gave to Americans during the Revolutionary War, the researchers said.

Comment Re:How much CO2? (Score 1) 253

It's not that much. The US military (and presumably others) has been experimenting with artificially creating cloud cover for decades. Conspiracy theories aside, there are a couple of relevant patents. One of them basically involves special afterburners, and the other one involves spraying metallics (just like the conspiracy theorists said, whee!)

Whether we should be doing this or not doesn't really have any bearing on whether we should be doing the other things, though. We could do both.

Comment Re:DRONE ON (Score 1) 253

On top of that, it's a stupid fucking argument to be making. Carbon emissions are not evenly distributed. A handful of the worlds rich assholes (read: us) are doing the vast majority of the climate change (See figure 1).

India and China are trying as hard as they can to come up to our levels of carbon release. This is a problem that has to be solved at a deeper level. It has to simply be cheaper not to pollute. Therefore this is where the bulk of the research should be going.

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