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Comment Re:I hope Apple Pay will die (Score 1) 283

You have to do that regardless, every few years, when you get a new card. I use a Web-only Mastercard. It used to be valid for one year. (They seem to have changed it, it's now valid for two years). I have no problem doing that. Usually, I just bother updating the card when a system tells me that my current card stored isn't valid any more. It grows organically over time.

Comment Re:huh? (Score 1) 146

A decade or two ago (I'm not really sure when he wrote it)) Brad Templeton suggested something like this as a fix for various problems, especially trademark. My take is that the basic idea is that TLDs are already meaningless, so diversifying them into increased meaninglessness does no damage while offering some benefits. (e.g. makes monopolizing certain words harder, makes it easier to try out new registration policies, etc)

Comment Re:Does anybody ... (Score 1) 474

how do you cut off *his* internet connection without cutting off the entire Ecuadorian Embassy's internet connection?

Go to the rack and unplug the ethernet cable whose other end is in Assange's room. Change the wifi password and only tell people the new one along with the instructions "don't share your password, especially with that Assange guy."

The "state actor" was Ecuador, or else it didn't happen. That's the only government capable of doing it.

Comment Re:Logical (Score 1) 365

Who is responsable in the case your AI-autonomous car decides to kill some pedestrians ?

I don't know. Tell me more about what happened right before that.

Was the pedestrian running out into traffic for laughs, to see all the cars crash into each other as some other threads here suggest? Was the occupant aiming it toward crowds to impress his friend with how it suddenly swerves away from the crowd when he takes his hands off the wheel? Did it just suddenly "randomly" turn off the street into a crowd as a result of a bug?

By the time someone or something decides "hit this or hit that" you already have a huge failure. That is way more important and common than the hit-this-or-that question itself.

Comment Re:Logical (Score 1) 365

If you're worried to the point of stupidity/paralysis ("be prepared to be sued out of existence") then you've already chosen to never drive even a manually-operated car, because you were overwhelmed by your fears. Most people don't have that attitude going on, so they already drive cars anyway, where they face constant daily risk of injuring or even killing pedestrians.

And some of them end up occasionally doing it, to many peoples' grief. For whatever reason, society didn't give up and decide the existence of cars was just too dangerous to allow. It's over a hundred years too late for to advocate against cars. By the time your grandparents were born, this argument (that we're having today) had already been settled.

How the vehicle got to be out of control is what everyone trying to establish liability will be asking. That it killed a pedestrian or driver is merely the motivation for asking.

Submission + - Strange New World: Samba Server running on Windows ! ( 1

Jeremy Allison - Sam writes: "Do you know what this is? This is a non-Windows SMB file server running natively on Windows."

"To be more specific, this is a Virtualbox Ubuntu virtual machine running on Windows 10, grabbing a file across SMB from a Samba file server running inside the Windows Subsystem for Linux through Bash."

Comment Re:A web browser rewriting web pages is good thing (Score 2) 76

Doesn't that seem counter-intuitive for a web browser to be rewriting the contents on a web page?

Speaking as someone who goes to extra trouble to add various extensions (e.g. ublock origin, privacy badger, tampermonkey, etc) to fix web pages because the browser still doesn't do enough, and who used proxies (squid-with-sleezeball, privoxy) before we had good browser extensions: no, it doesn't seem even slightly counter-intuitive. Why would it be counter-intuitive? I totally don't get it.

Shouldn't it be rendering it exactly as the developers intended it?

It should be rendering it however the user intends to see it.

Isn't this the browser equivalent of a compiler that inserts malicious code in programs that it compiles?

Yes, it is, if you look at it loosely enough. But then, it's also the browser equivalent of a program loader than removes malicious code from the programs it loads, or a linker that binds symbolic references to addresses, or a program that compresses data, or an image resizer, or good ol' awk and sed, or ... it's the browser equivalent of the web browser itself (rendering pages instead of showing HTML tags)! Gee, filtering data is like a lot of things!

Sorry you've had so many bad experiences that the first analogy that came to your mind was something unpleasant. Do you use a lot of malware? Maybe cut back on that.

Comment Polished turds (Score 1) 292

I don't think I've ever come across a modern in-car GPS/entertainment system that is *not* a polished turd. The GPS navigation software is always terrible - slow, counterintuitive and annoying to use with an unresponsive UI meaning you're not sure if it actually accepted the touch screen input, difficult and costly to have updated, and if it allows over the air updates requires a contract (more cost). The system will also be hilariously dated before the car is even a third of a way through its expected lifetime. Often they are hilariously dated the day the car rolls off the production line.

I'd rather a car came with an entertainment system that had just one thing: a decent Bluetooth audio system and nothing else. That way the updates are on whatever device I use.

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