Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 Internet speed test! ×

Comment Re:Fortran (Score 1) 509

My father showed me basic when I wanted to use the computer as a calculator (basic arithmetic). I discovered programming.

He then saw talent in me and bought me a Turbo Pascal book (in my mother tongue... English would not have worked at that age) and a copy of Turbo Pascal (I presume from work, but... I don't know where exactly he got it from).

... and that's how he awoke my interest in computers and ultimately the profession I would choose.

Thanks dad...

Education

Slashdot Asks: What Was Your First Programming Language? (stanforddaily.com) 509

This question was inspired by news that Stanford's computer science professor Eric Roberts will try JavaScript instead of Java in a new version of the college's introductory computer programming course. The Stanford Daily reports: When Roberts came to Stanford in 1990, CS106A was still taught in Pascal, a programming language he described as not "clean." The department adopted the C language in 1992. When Java came out in 1995, the computer science faculty was excited to transition to the new language. Roberts wrote the textbooks, worked with other faculty members to restructure the course and assignments and introduced Java at Stanford in 2002... "Java had stabilized," Roberts said. "It was clear that many universities were going in that direction. It's 2017 now, and Java is showing its age." According to Roberts, Java was intended early on as "the language of the Internet". But now, more than a decade after the transition to Java, Javascript has taken its place as a web language.
In 2014 Python and Java were the two most commonly-taught languages at America's top universities, according to an analysis published by the Communications of the ACM. And Java still remains the most-commonly taught language in a university setting, according to a poll by the Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education. In a spreadsheet compiling the results, "Python appears 60 times, C++ 54 times, Java 84 times, and JavaScript 28 times," writes a computing professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, adding "if Java is dying (or "showing its age"...) it's going out as the reigning champ."

I'm guessing Slashdot's readers have their own opinions about this, so share your educational experiences in the comments. What was your first programming language?

Comment Re:IMAP & SMTP (Score 2) 68

That is because you assume that "Apps" are the same as "Applications" or "Programs". That isn't really the case: "Apps" come from the mobile space and are usually touch optimized dumbed down versions. Often they are just fronts for web applications, instead of full native applications. Applications or programs like Thunderbird are not "Apps", they stand on their own and talk SMTP and IMAP and are compatible with all servers that speak these open protocols. That is inherently superior than proprietary "Apps" that do not talk open protocols.

Comment Re:It's not his arrest that is a priority (Score 1, Troll) 356

Making an example out of Assange won't help anything though, there will just be someone else stepping up. Assange is not the problem, you are.

There's an old proverb: "When everyone you meet is an asshole, it means that you're not beating up all the assholes fast enough and if only you can speed it up, everyone else will eventually become convinced that you must be one of the good guys."

I know it doesn't sound eloquent, though.

Comment Re: How to copy? (Score 1) 167

Doesn't work that way.

*of course* it doesn't... That's was the whole point of the thought experiment.

They may store a copy of the account balance on the card. This is only for your convenience - so the card can report "out of money" and reject the offline transaction.

That would be a reasonable assumption. I wouldn't count on it... Overdraft fees are the bread and butter of banks ;-)

Comment Re: How to copy? (Score 1) 167

Last time I was in Val Thorens (basically the highest ski resort in France, maybe Europe), I could use my cellphone everywhere... including Internet. Hell, the *first* time I went there, I surfed on the internet using my Psion Revo connection using IR to my Siemens 35i using GRPS. Given the hardware, you can basically guess when exactly that was.

Besides, all it needs is a phone line.: Classic POTS for the terminal base to be connected (the handsets can be wirelessly connected to it), and if those people had a phone, they had a connection.

Comment Re: How to copy? (Score 3, Interesting) 167

From my understanding, in Europe, the chip and pin does make a connection. Terminals generally do have a connection. For a while a lot of them were GPRS or POTS, so you can guess how long this has been used. I remember a few restaurants that had horrible cell reception, and you were pretty much asked to come chip and pin at the counter where reception was acceptable.

I do think that below a certain threshold amount, making the connection isn't mandatory. That's usually when it goes quickly and it doesn't say "connecting". I've only seen it happen on small amounts. Do note, that this is what I conclude from the behaviour. It would be better if someone who actually knows how this works to chime in.

If anything, I do not think that it's the card that stores the transaction. It would not make any sense at all. Imagine I do a 1000€ purchase, and it would be store-on-card. At that point, I destroy the card or never use it again. My card never gets the chance to "synchronize" with anything. Now, perhaps I misunderstood what you meant with "the balance would be kept on the card", but it definitely doesn't involve storing anything on the card. It's the terminal that must store and forward the transaction. Granted, it doesn't change anything in your scenario, but given European chip 'n pin do connect, I doubt you attack would be feasible (ignoring the fact you need a 1000 unconnected terminals, which is doing to be very hard to find).

Comment Re: This won't really matter (Score 1) 221

Don't diss old Thinkpads. I got myself a Thinkpad X220 (Intel Sandy Bridge) for 179EUR recently and given the form factor (12") and the fact you can slap in 16GB RAM (99EUR) and a SSD suiting your needs (I went for 128GB, I don't need much - 49EUR), I have kick ass machine for 327EUR total. It even still has 85% of battery capacity left. Getting replacement batteries is no problem for Thinkpads, but right now this is sufficient.

That's netbook prices, for mid-level laptop (typically 15") performance. Granted... Pre-owned, but we are talking about recycling.

It comes with a 7 license, I upgraded it to 10 with the "assistive technologies" upgrade and now I can choose to run 7 or 10 on it... This is mainly for the day, I want to pass it on to a new user. I simply run Linux on it and everything works out of the box.

Granted, I have no idea what I'd do with 10 of them and a new MacBook sure would be nice... but for the thrifty, I'd suggest getting a Thinkpad any time

Comment Re:Imagine that (Score 1) 221

I am still using my iPhone 5. It's on it's third battery though, and the current one is (again) bulging. I need to find a better battery supplier.

What I do think, is that upon the next iOS refresh, they'll go full 64-bit and then the iPhone 5 will be out.

At that point I might get my wifes old iPhone 6 (She always gets the newest, I take her old one), but I really prefer the iPhone 5 form factor. I might splurge one an SE instead.

Slashdot Top Deals

"It's the best thing since professional golfers on 'ludes." -- Rick Obidiah

Working...