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Comment Re:Why (Score 1) 921

Wanting to eject Muslims from the US is a political aim

Bullshit. As of now I've yet to see any policy about ejecting muslims from the US.

I was making the point that one need not seek policy in order to be working towards a political goal... and you respond that you don't see anyone seeking policy, apparently completely missing the point.

Comment Re:Maybe, but maybe not (Score 1) 149

Sure but my Uber account works in 20+ countries worldwide, I don't have to sign up for the local transit whatever. That's a huge plus. (...) As someone traveling in Hawaii, California, Texas, London and Hungary

...you might be in a niche market. Everything you said about billing sure but for most people most the time it's a very limited geographical area. You can search for "taxi <city>" and install the local app ten times waiting to get off the plane, not that airports lack taxi queues. And I usually pay by a credit card that's linked to the travel and expense system no matter what the currency is, it not only works for taxi rides it works for everything else. I'm not saying it's not nice to have... but in terms of make or break for Uber's business model I think it's totally irrelevant.

Comment Re:"In the wild" - slight exaggeration (Score 1) 126

Umm, that is an uncited claim in the summary. Nothing of the sort is stated in any of the links. The summary links to a paper that provides more details of the attack. Very heavy and technical though a few inital takeaways from it is that implementations only take a few days to run on gear they have so does seem safe to assume that SHA-1 collisions are pretty much pwned.

The Python script in question doesn't find new SHA-1 collisions. It takes two input PDFs and produces two output PDFs that hash to the same value. It uses some quirks of how PDFs work, plus that original SHAttered collision generated by the Google researchers. Finding another collision is a lot of work. Using a known collision to generate PDFs with the same hash value is not.

https://github.com/nneonneo/sha1collider

Comment Re:Turn it off (Score 2) 172

I've spent this weekend trying to repurpose an old laptop as a media/streaming machine, and decided to go Linux rather than Windows. It most certainly has not been easier. Maybe if you've worked with the system for years and know the ins-and-outs it is second nature, but Linux has caused all sorts of issues I wouldn't have had on Windows.

If you've worked with Windows for years and know the ins-and-outs of that system, it's a lot easier to set Windows up than something else. Personally, when I have to set up a Windows system, I have a lot of issues I wouldn't have on Linux.

I know because I had to install a Windows system for the first time in about a decade a few months ago. It took me all day and lots of hair-pulling to figure out how to find and install all of the drivers needed to make the thing run. At the end I was still left with a few devices showing errors in the device manager, which I was simply unable to get working. It worked enough, so I gave up on the rest. The worst part of the process was that right after installation Windows had no functioning drivers, for ethernet, Wifi or USB, which made it really hard to get drivers onto the box. I solved this by booting a Linux LiveCD (which worked out of the box), creating a small FAT32 partition, downloading the ridiculously bloated 250MB (WTF?!?) ethernet driver onto it, then booting Windows again and installing from the FAT32 partition. I have no idea how a Windows guy would have solved that.

Comment Re:Too good to be true. (Score 2) 175

It doesn't work like that. Radiative heating/cooling works via exchange of IR. You're not just giving it up; everything you're radiating at is proportionally radiating back at you. So you cool the most when you're radiatively exchanging with something that's very cold. Aka, you want to be radiatively exchanging with the cosmic microwave background, not with low-altitude clouds. That's the whole point of radiating at low absorption frequencies in the atmosphere: so that you're exchanging with space, not with atmospheric air.

Comment Re:What's wrong with public domain code? (Score 1) 39

Stallman may argue that you need to make sure the code is free in the future, but I'd settle for the code being free now.

I don't see any reason they shouldn't do both. They should release it under a good copyleft license, but note on their repository that all source code from the DoD is in the public domain. Those who wish to take the federal code and carefully verify that no non-federal contributions have been added (or who are willing to strip out all of the non-federal code) can use it in whatever way they like, since it's in the public domain. Contributions by others, however, will by default be owned by the contributor but licensed under the copyleft license. In the event someone uses their code in a way that violates the license, they'll have standing to sue for infringement, though the DoD will not.

Comment Re:People without a clue commenting on crypto (Score 1) 185

There's nothing wrong with that use of SHA1, but I can't think of a threat model in which it actually accomplishes anything useful, not because SHA1 is defective, but because passwords are. If an attacker gets the hash, he can almost certainly recover the password. Further, your implied threat model seems to assume that an attacker may be inside the system (which is a good assumption), where he can grab the in-flight hashes. But if that's the case, what prevents the attacker from replaying the hashes? At that point in the system, the hashes are the passwords, they unlock access. So the attacker doesn't even need the user's password.

Also, have you benchmarked SHA256? On modern hardware it's generally cheaper than SHA1. Assuming there actually is a good reason for hashing, you may be able to quiet the complainers and improve performance with one change.

Comment Re:That's a new war (Score 2) 84

You don't even have to make it public, you can make it privately owned by the person or people at the end of that mile. A few places have followed this kind of model and had the connection to the nearest back-haul link owned as part of the title on the individual houses and that include a share in the ownership of the company that owns the exchange and contracts maintenance and service provision to other ISPs. It puts the individual homeowners in a much stronger bargaining position because now an ISP that offers competitive rates and service gets a few hundred customers and loses them all at once if they provide bad service.

Comment Re:Too good to be true. (Score 1) 175

This seems to be an incredible invention that will be a game changer. Passive cooling on the order of what this article talks about would seem to be too good to be true. If it is true these guys should be filthy rich soon.

Well the article certainly lacks critical sense:

And because it can be made cheaply at high volumes, it could be used to passively cool buildings and electronics such as solar cells, which work more efficiently at lower temperatures.

Cool solar cells.... by blocking the sunlight *facepalm*. Also I'm thinking how big a deal is the "not blocked by the atmosphere" really, I mean it's not like heat reflected of a little building significantly changes the ambient temperature. And finally production cost is one thing, but how it works in real dust-covered conditions and if it can survive being exposed to the weather all year long is another matter. I don't think it's quite as revolutionary as the article might suggest.

Comment Re:"Police found Purinton 80 miles away at Applebe (Score 1) 921

I know I know, "clump of cells" and all. But Progressive are incredibly blasé about life in one sense and incredibly dramatic about it in another.

There are strict legal limits on abortion, which basically boil down to 'you can't kill it if it has a brain stem'. Do you eat meat? If so, the animals that you kill are closer to an intelligent being than anything that it's legal to abort. The millions sperm that die every time that you ejaculate are also denied the ability to grow into an adult human, but you don't seem too concerned about those, yet that have precisely the same level of intelligence as an aborted zygote and each one has half of the ability to grow into an adult human. Attempting to claim some kind of moral equivalence between a collection of insentient cells and a living sentient human is insulting to anyone reading your post.

Comment Re:"Police found Purinton 80 miles away at Applebe (Score 1) 921

" those who had weapons were during that time required to register with the government so they could be called up as part of the militia."

As it is today.
The only difference is that it is, in fact, automatic. If you are a citizen (or declared to want to be), not part of the National Guard or Naval Militia, and you are male from 17 to 44, you are part of the UNORGANIZED MILITIA.

10 U.S. Code  311 - Militia: composition and classes

Current through Pub. L. 114-38. (See Public Laws for the current Congress.)
(a) The militia of the United States consists of all able-bodied males at least 17 years of age and, except as provided in section 313 of title 32, under 45 years of age who are, or who have made a declaration of intention to become, citizens of the United States and of female citizens of the United States who are members of the National Guard.
(b) The classes of the militia areâ"
(1) the organized militia, which consists of the National Guard and the Naval Militia; and
(2) the unorganized militia, which consists of the members of the militia who are not members of the National Guard or the Naval Militia.
(Aug. 10, 1956, ch. 1041, 70A Stat. 14; Pub. L. 85â"861, Ââ1(7), Sept. 2, 1958, 72 Stat. 1439; Pub. L. 103â"160, div. A, title V, Ââ524(a), Nov. 30, 1993, 107 Stat. 1656.)

Comment Re:Not really a success for the AI (Score 1) 72

No, this is like a self-driving car that only works in GTA because it has a pipe into the hard data for locations of obstacles and other vehicles etc.

Wouldn't that still mean you've reduced an AI problem into a computer vision/identification problem? Like making a video recording of a chess board and saying if we could identify where the pieces are, we'd know what to play. I imagine the computer could look at the framebuffer and "derender" the picture back into game state a lot faster than a human, then feed that into the same algorithm. Would that really be meaningfully different?

Comment Re:"Police found Purinton 80 miles away at Applebe (Score 1) 921

Please tell me how you plan to get rid of them in such a way that disarms criminals equally as well as it disarms law-abiding citizens

You might like to look at the UK, where owning a pistol went from something anyone might do for self defence, to something that you'd only do if you were a member of a shooting club, to something that you basically can't do, over a period of a few decades. One of the ways that this happened was by significantly increasing the penalties around the '60s for crimes where the perpetrator was armed, as well as for illegal trafficking in firearms. If carrying a gun to a crime means that, if you get caught, you'll spent 20 years in prison instead of two, then a lot of criminals will take a knife instead. If a firearm-related murder with an illegal gun leads to the seller going to prison for almost as long as the perpetrator then black marketeers find something lower risk to sell.

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