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Comment Re:Given the reviews (Score 1) 444

Here is a good example from the bad old days, new games aren't USUALLY this bad but I chose this because its rather easy to see the pop in...notice how it looks like the path ahead is clear then suddenly mountains and other terrain just magically appear in front of the ship? That is pop in which is caused when a game for whatever reason is simply incapable of rendering in objects before they come close enough to the player for the player not to notice their being drawn...THAT is pop in and its irritating as hell and pretty much kills any sense of immersion in the game world.

Comment Re:It's Sony - duh (Score 1) 444

Bullshit as from all reports it would take quite a bit of time to get towards the center (where the devs said in interview after interview was where all the faction system and battles would be taking place) only to find...its not there, its all been ripped out or was straight up vaporware.

At the end of the day? No Man's Sky is fraud, plain and simple. in interview after interview, some being given mere DAYS before release they touted features that did not exist and showed content that simply did not exist in game. Since the game has procedurally generated worlds? Its quite possible you get started on some shit world where it takes dozens of hours to gather the resources required to get really up and running just to find out all those features, the faction system, big space battles, planets where you have day/night cycles and weather based on its place in the system, an economy where you can be a trader or miner or make runs for various factions....they just do not exist.

A the end of the day I see NO difference between this and Aliens:Colonial Marines. In both cases you had devs showing content that didn't exist, hyped features that didn't exist, and the footage shown turned out to be bullshit. Sorry but they deserve a refund if they ask for it because at the end of the day what was shown and what they got? Couldn't be more opposite.

Comment The reason why Schneier is a target (Score 1) 181

It's common knowledge that if you knock out Chuck Norris with a roundhouse kick you become the new Chuck Norris.

Similarly, if you manage to steal Bruce Schneier's identity, you become the new Bruce Schneier.

No wonder he's a target. Everybody wants to be him.

My personal favorite Bruce Schneier Fact: "Most people use passwords. Some people use passphrases. Bruce Schneier uses an epic passpoem, detailing the life and works of seven mythical Norse heroes."

Comment A few obvious corrections (Score 1) 53

First, DES is 56 bit (near enough 60). Triple DES as per first mode (the authorised standard) is 168 bits. The article fails to distinguish, implying the authors are just a little bit naff. 3DES seems to be quite safe, as long as not used in DES emulation mode. And who the hell emulates a mode that was broken in the 80s?

Second, Blowfish was replaced by TwoFish, ThreeFish and Speck. Skein, an entrant to the DES3 challenge, makes use of ThreeFish.

Third, the Wikipedia page states it has been known for a long time that weak keys are bad. This particular attack, though, is a birthday attack. You can find all the ciphers vulnerable or free that you should be using. Anything not on the list is something you are solely responsible for.

http://csrc.nist.gov/archive/a...

In other words, this information is about as useful as telling up that Model T Fords weren't good at cornering at highway speeds. Below are some links, I can't be buggered to HTML-ify them.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wik...
http://www.skein-hash.info/
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wik...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wik...

I do not trust most encryption software these days, but that's because programmers these days are sloppy and arrogant.

Comment Re:Take action (Score 5, Insightful) 259

What were you smoking? Win2K Pro was a fucking GREAT OS, rock solid, no eye candy bullshit, it just did what a great OS should do which is STFU and get out of the way so you can run your programs. XP was Fisher Price trash for kiddies, XP X64 (which was really Win 2K3 Workstation, MSFT got wind of so many of us turning 2K3 into desktops they just decided to sell it) was a damn fine OS, 7 is still a kick ass OS, and 8/8.1 is a good OS IF and ONLY IF you strip out the crapstore and spyware garbage and slap on Classic Shell, otherwise its UI will irritate the hell out of you.

But one thing we can all agree on is this...Windows 10 is trash. That is all it is, its trash. It gives you NOTHING better than the previous OSes, even its touted "features" are nothing but datamining trojan horse shit, takes away your ability to keep busted updates (which appears to be damned near a weekly thing with that POS) from being installed, has fucking ADWARE baked into the damned thing, has made BSOD a common condition again which I thought had died with XP, there is honestly not a single positive I can say about that piece of garbage.

Comment Re:The MS Merry Go Round. (Score 5, Interesting) 211

Ain't no suspecting required, just look up Barancles Nerdgasm's "I was fired" video on YouTube. He was part of the testing team and talks about how pretty much all the QA and testing teams for Windows were fired and makes it clear the vibe at Redmond was pretty much Insider for alpha testing, Home and Pro is the beta, Enterprise is the actual product...which is of course the only version you have to rent instead of buy.

This is why I'm telling my customers to stay far away from Win 10 and if they get a new PC with that POS OS? I point them to Win 8 OEM which you can get quite cheaply (and once upgraded to 8.1 with Classic Shell is just Win 7 with some speed tweaks) because even with the new OEM systems it doesn't take more than one or two patches before I'm getting calls that shit is broken.

Now I've had every version of windows since 3.1, including the shitastic WinME and the bloated irritating Vista...Win10 IMHO is the worst product they have EVER came out with bar none. WinME? You could hack in some files from Win98 SE and make it a decent if not good OS. Vista? You could use NLite to chop out the crap and make an okay, not as good as XP X64 but an okay OS for daily use. And of course Win 8/8.1 you could just slap on Classic Shell and take out the crapstore and telemetry crap and its a good solid performer...Win 10? IMHO its not even beta quality, with every update just as much shit gets broke as gets fixed and frankly until Win 10 I had even forgotten what a BSOD looked like simply because how well previous versions past XP handled major errors. Its just not a good OS folks, its buggy, has baked in spyware and ads, it doesn't even look nice, its just a bad product.

Hopefully by the time 8.1 (if not 7) is reaching EOL they will have given Nutella his walking papers, if they haven't? Well I don't think there will be a Windows business to worry about really, it'll just be legacy installs while everyone is on Google or Apple OSes. Ballmer tried to kill the company being a faux Apple, Nutella is trying to finish the job by being a faux Google.

Comment Re:The end justifies the means (Score 0) 303

It's probably not that meaningful, anyway. Somewhere around 20-40% of the info in these documents will turn out to be wrong or misleading in some critical way. Mostly, it'll just be a case of "name files", with info about different people with the same (or similar) names entered in the wrong place. People will learn pretty quickly to deny anything they don't like. Of course, others will believe whatever they want about you, especially if it was in some "secret" document. But they too will learn that the info about them is also full of errors. More importantly, your friends and relatives will learn the same thing.

I've yet to see any official document about me (including medical records) that didn't have some bizarre thing with unknown origin. The people who keep the records just respond with a grin and a comment starting with "Yeah ....".

Actually, my favorite example, which my wife loves telling other people, is one of those "not even wrong" things that a nurse wrote down after a routine exam, saying that I was 5'13" tall and weighted 135 pounds. I am in fact about six feet one inch, but 135 pounds would make me one of the scrawniest six-footers on the planet. She'd used one of those old-fashioned scales with sliding weights, and had forgotten that she'd slid over a third 50-pound weight. But I've since then seen several personal histories that include that 135-pound weight back then. Once such things get into the database, they're almost impossible to correct. This is especially true of medical records. This can be really annoying to those that've had a "false positive" diagnosis somewhere along the line. But such things are pretty good at teaching you how much you can trust the "official" data about other people.

(I sometimes wonder if official records in other "advanced" countries are as screwed up as they are here in the US. I'd guess that they probably are.)

Comment Re:DONT LET THE FBI RE-WRITE HISTORY FOR YOUTHS (Score 1) 70

people do have their names :)

Not really; according to the US Census Bureau, there are about 1800 Americans with my (first+last) name. And probably a whole bunch of them have the same middle name, which is also one of the top 10 men's names in the US. My parents didn't have much imagination when it came to baby names.

OTOH, my wife continues to use her birth name for most purposes (which is fine by me). She likes the fact that, as far as she can determine, she's the only living human with that name. (And it's not even some unpronounceable "foreign" sounding name. She also likes to point out to people that her name is a syntactically correct English sentence. She has even found archived newspaper images that have her name at the top of a story. ;-)

But anyway, most of us don't "have" our names in any meaningful sense. We're just one of many who are using the name for a few decades, until we drop out of the crowd that are using it.

In college, I had a friend who was a member of the Bill Smith Club, whose only membership criterion is that you be named (or married to someone named) Bill Smith (or William Smythe or Wilhelm Schmidt or anything else that maps onto the name).

Comment Re:I don't get it (Score 1) 130

It's a damn shame they didn't do it with the shuttle external fuel tanks. Those things were huge. How many would we have in use now if that was part of the design?

They didn't do it because the ET would have become the cargo - the Orbiter itself couldn't carry much beyond it's crew. On top of that, the altitude they would have been delivered to would have required regular reboosts. (Any tank launched before the turn of the century and not reboosted would be gone by now.) On top of *that* it required a number of dedicated Shuttle flights to lift all the stuff needed to outfit the interior.

In the end, using external tanks was very, very expensive for very little functionality.

Comment Re:Too bad they can't use the SS ext. tanks (Score 1) 130

Shuttle ETs never got up to a stable orbit. It would have been possible to use the OMS to take them up there, but then the Shuttle would have had basically no payload capacity on that mission.

And even then, the tanks would be low enough to require regular reboosts. Without reboosts, any tanks launched before around the turn of the century would already have re-entered.

Comment Matches my observations (Score 4, Funny) 192

Over the last couple of months, when I cut through one of the local parks on its bike trail, it's looked like the Night of the Living Dead: A bunch of zombies obliviously wandering around, staring down into their phones and cluelessly blocking the path.

Lately, the zombie outbreak seems to have abated somewhat, and the bike path isn't so much of an obstacle course.

Comment Nonsense (Score 4, Interesting) 130

From the interview: "The reason that Skylab wasn't build like this is kind of a strange story: [NASA] had fewer Saturn IBs than they had Saturn Vs, so von Braun just decided to use a Saturn V and fly up a "dry" lab, with all of the equipment aboard it already."

Um, not quite. When a 'spare' Saturn V became available (because a lunar mission was cancelled), they swapped from a IB 'wet' lab to a V 'dry' lab because the 'wet' labs were very expensive for their very low capability. The expense came from needing to have considerable amounts of structure and infrastructure designed to survive inside the cryogenic conditions inside the tank, from redesigning the tanks to serve a dual role, and then re-certifying the whole deal for flight. The low capability came from the requirement that everything that couldn't survive a bath in deep cryogens having to be manhandled into place via the very narrow docking hatch. While a dry lab was more expensive than a wet one - the leap in capability was far greater than the leap in cost.

That's also why NASA built their ISS modules with the large CBM hatches - manhandling large amount of stuff through tiny hatches (like those the Ixion will use) simply isn't very efficient. (And that's without considering the headaches that splitting all your equipment down into tiny chunks brings. Not just handling - but installation and integration too.) All of the ISS cargo craft that NASA is responsible for uses CBM, as does the Japanese HTV.

"In the commercial sector, it's getting interesting, because people are taking more risks. Not unnecessary risks, but acceptable risks to reduce costs."

Moving your man hours (outfitting the module) from expensive ones on the ground to hellishly expensive ones on orbit is not a recipe for cutting costs. Especially since you still have to pay for the launch of the module (Centaur) *and* the launch of the stuff to go inside it. (You can't piggyback because no Centaurs are headed anywhere near the ISS.) Even in lower inclination orbits, the mission module, the rendezvous systems, and outfitting the Centaur to survive years on orbit are all going to cost money and cut into it's payload - which will make piggybacking unattractive to Centaur's usual customers.

"We want to keep hardware costs as low as possible: it's not about building something on the ground that could cost hundreds of millions of dollars. Why do that when you have perfectly good hardware going to space, paid for already?"

You don't have perfectly good hardware going to space already. You have a vehicle designed for a completely different purpose and completely lacking the "stuff" customers will pay you for going to orbit.

Or, in short, nothing in the article or interview leaves me with a warm fuzzy that they've solved any of the well known problems with 'wet' systems.

Comment Re:What Envirmental Wacko caused it? (Score 1) 319

The system itself worked correctly, as the containment system properly contained the leak.

o.0 A huge chunk of the storage facility is contaminated because a supposedly stable drum exploded - no, the system emphatically did not work correctly. It was never supposed to blow up in the first place.

Comment When will there be Pi2/Pi3 images? (Score 1) 134

The archaic ARMv6 architecture CPU in the original Pi is radically different from the ARMv7+NEON of the Pi2 or the ARMv8 of the Pi3. When the Pi2 was released you said the performance advantage of ARMv7 builds optimized for the Pi2 wasn't big enough to justify the complication of having a separate OS image. But after the introduction of the Pi3, as people migrate to newer Pis and the rest of the open source ARM world takes v7 and NEON for granted, don't the scales start to tip in favor of builds for modern processors?

Mathematica devs in particular have said that having to target such disparate architectures in a single binary prevents them from using a high-performance BLAS, which slows many kinds of algorithms down dramatically. And many multimedia codecs have had extensive NEON optimizations but these don't always get enabled at runtime on Pi2/3.

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