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Comment Re:Another one to add to the list (Score 1) 13

the warpath

LOL, you really do love making mountains out of molehills.

Keep trying to deny that you are just whining.

I'm not denying it. I'm asking you for proof to support your bizarre claims. Which you can't do. Thanks for playing!

Comment IQ and attention to detail are different things. (Score 1) 165

"How hard is to remember to unload your weapon before packing it?" I guess there's no I.Q. check for firearms purchases, maybe there should be.

IQ and attention to detail are different things.

Also: Even the best-trained, most reliable, gun user can have a lapse when in a hurry, as in when packing for a flight.

That's why firearms training stresses redundancy, with rules like "A gun is loaded as soon as you put it down and look away". Or "Don't point (even an "unloaded") gun at anything you don't want to destroy."

The phenomenon is referred to as "a visit from the Ammo Fairy". That entity is similar to the Tooth Fairy, but instead of leaving a coin under you pillow it leaves a round in your chamber. B-)

Comment I have read much of it, as I would an encyclopedia (Score 3, Interesting) 355

My wife and I each had a copy of the first three volumes when we married. Yes, there are female computer nerds. B-)

I first encountered it when assigned one of the volumes as a text back in 1971. Of course the class didn't consist of learning EVERYTHING in the volume. B-)

I use it from time to time - mainly as a reference book. Most recently this spring, when I needed a reference on a data structure (circular linked lists) for a paper. I've found it useful often when doing professional computer programming and hardware design (for instance, where the hardware has to support some software algorithm efficiently, or efficient algorithms in driver software allow hardware simplification).

I don't try to read it straight through. But when I need a algorithm for some job and it's not immediately obvious which is best, the first place I check is Knuth. He usually has a clear description of some darned good wheel that was already invented decades ago, analyzed to a fare-thee-well.

I only see him about once a year. He's still a sharp cookie.

Comment They let the ban on propagandizing citizens expire (Score 4, Informative) 319

Three and a half years ago the US government, under the Obama administration, let the ban on propagandizing US citizens expire - and immediately began writing and spreading "fake news".

From an FP article dated July 14, 2013:

U.S. Repeals Propaganda Ban, Spreads Government-Made News to Americans

For decades, a so-called anti-propaganda law prevented the U.S. governmentâ(TM)s mammoth broadcasting arm from delivering programming to American audiences. But on July 2, that came silently to an end with the implementation of a new reform passed in January. The result: an unleashing of thousands of hours per week of government-funded radio and TV programs for domestic U.S. consumption in a reform initially criticized as a green light for U.S. domestic propaganda efforts.

So the only thing new here is US citizens noticed one of the government's renewed, official, domestic propaganda operations.

Comment Re:We need a parts database for stuff. (Score 1) 263

But certainly there are plenty of components (such as the plastic drive gears in a garage door opener) which can be printed and replaced by consumers.

And how often does the average consumer need to print out weird parts? (And how many of them actually have the skills, experience, and tools to make use of them?)
 
  That is the fundamental limitation of 3D printing - the average consumer doesn't have significant need and/or the relevant skills. The "needs" 3D enthusiasts keep positing will enable the consumer (mass market) adoption are in fact edge cases.

Comment Re:The problems are many (Score 1) 263

Prusa Research has been pushing the technology closer to a consumer class appliance.

The problem isn't the lack of a consumer class appliance. Never has been. The problem is lack of consumer need or even desire - and that's going to be difficult to overcome. Most people don't need something printed daily, or even weekly. A significant percentage don't need something printed even monthly. There's just no mass market to be had. Other than the maker market (the folks who make cool stuff just because), the only real market in the near term (a decade or so) are other hobbyists (model railroaders, dollhouse builders, etc...) and that market isn't that big and is going to be very tough to crack. 3D printers are nowhere near capable of producing all the components required (and won't be for a good while yet), and the cost of learning a new skillset on top the cash outlay will be a strong deterrent.
 
The only market for 3D printers in the near term isn't the individual consumer (and likely won't ever be), but the small manufacturer serving niche communities.

Comment Re:Another one to add to the list (Score 1) 13

That same what.

Then you misunderstood. That comment has to do with the fact that the majority of Senate seats up for reelection in 2018 are in deep red states. This is a math problem, not another notch in your "both sides are hoooooorrible" lament.

Still trying to play your little games with me, eh?

TIL trying to clarify your shitty use of language = "playing a game". Fucking delusional.

Fuck the democrats.

We know.

I don't want them to regain anything.

We know.

That's your partisan whining.

TIL pointing electoral math = "partisan whining". Fucking obsessive.

blah blah blah

We know. Find a new tune already. The world has moved on. Why can't you?

Comment Re:Another one to add to the list (Score 1) 13

Same goes for the democratic machine candidates

Same what? What are you talking about?

This is just more of your own partisan whining.

Me noting the fact that 2018 is an uphill battle for Dems to recapture the Senate is partisan and whining how? Your ability to make hay form thin air is astounding.

Comment Re:Another one to add to the list (Score 1) 13

If tallying up the broken promises helps to drive out some of the hacktacular idiots in 2018 I'm all for it.

Nah. Every single GOP Senator could go out and shoot a random person in the face on live TV and 2018 would still work in their favour, the map is that bad.

Comment Re:Another one to add to the list (Score 2) 13

I'm less interested in broken promises (all politicians have that problem) than I am trying to figure out what parts of the Trump admin could actually be called unconventional. Figuring out what parts will be basic GOP crap and which will be pants-wetting disasters will be crucial to navigating the next four years.

Comment FTC, not FCC, is the correct agency. (Score 2) 191

Most of the harm from ISP misbehavior is the manifestation of one of two perverse-incentive situations:
  - integration of an ISP into a content-provider megacorp, leading to penalization of competitors or other perceived threats to the larger content-providing component.
  - an under-competitive market situation (monopoly, duopoly, other under-four-competitors) situation, allowing ISPs to provide less than they promised or less than what is expected of "internet service" without a "vote with their feet" option for customers.

Both of these are not internet-technology issues and both are things the FCC handles poorly, and which are outside its mandate. They're better handled by such agencies as the FTC and DOJ, under antitrust and consumer fraud models, than by the FCC.

With respect to the content-provider/ISP vertical integration issue: Trump has already come out opposing the ATT/ Time-Warner merger. Additionally, the mainstream media's pile-on against his campaign has left him with no love for the "content providers". I'd be willing to bet that he'd be all for antitrust action to split up the other ISP ("content transport") / news reporting ("content generation") partnerships under the rubric of "breaking up anticompetitive vertical integration". B-)

Comment Re:Well then... (Score 1) 586

Why didn't they start this years ago when Obama extended and expanded the Patriot Act?

Probably because:
  - Servers in the US have First Amendment protection
  - Servers in other countries have whatever protection - or restrictions - the other countries have.

In particular:
  - Moving certain data (such as encryption software) from the US to other countries may violate US export laws. (Backing up a server in the US to a server outside the US is more clearly an export than serving in the US something that was downloaded in the US.)
  - Storing certain data - such as personal information, NAZI propaganda, or criticism of various governments - may be illegal in various countries.

So setting up a backup in some other country was probably perceived as more risk than leaving the data solely in the US under Obama, while the perceived risk to the data under Trump may be enough to move the volunteers to take on the extra trouble .

(If Brewster hasn't commented on this by then, I'll try to remember to ask him the next time I see him. But that's probably most of a year away...)

Comment Re:Pay attention. (Score 2, Interesting) 153

This allows the government to hack AN UNLIMITED NUMBER OF COMPUTERS if they have a rubber stampped warrant from a judge who has no understanding of what they are signing.

I would assume that a judge would have some common sense. A warrant might say "All computers own by XXX person" or "all computers at XXX location." I doubt that a judge will sign a warrant for "all computers in Utah."

What is the alternative? "Whoops, we got a warrant to search five computers, but all of the illegal stuff is on computer #6, so we have to let this criminal go?"

Judges had to go through law school -- they are generally not stupid. I bet that most of them even own a computer or two.

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